Scholarships, Studentships & Bursaries

University Level Funding

(Y Werin Legacy Fund)

The scholarship shall be of the same value as a University Postgraduate Studentship, subject to available funds. The candidate must pursue a scheme of study for a postgraduate research degree in Arts or in Science at Bangor University.

Further information and application

Application form.

(Y Werin Legacy Fund)

The scholarship offers up to £1,500 to support talented graduates from Welsh Universities with an interest in language, literature, history and antiquities of Wales.

Further information and application

(Y Werin Legacy Fund)

The Llewelyn Williams Postgraduate Studentship enables research in Welsh History, including Welsh laws and economic aspects of Welsh life. The scholarship offers up to £7,000 to support talented History, Law and Economics graduates with an interest in postgraduate research in a Welsh University.

Further information and application

(Y Werin Legacy Fund)

The scholarship offers up to £2,000 to support talented graduates from Welsh Universities with an interest in Journalism or International Affairs.

Further information and application

Bangor University is a member of the Athena SWAN Gender Equality charter and as such committed to gender equality and diversity, and to creating and promoting an inclusive culture for staff and students at all levels. The Inclusive Bangor scholarships are to support graduating students in continuing their studies at Bangor - particularly in areas where our student numbers show an underrepresentation of certain groups. These Scholarships are for a masters degree (taught or by research) in any discipline. One scholarship per College will be awarded.

What’s included?

Payment towards tuition fees for one-year taught or research postgraduate Masters (or for two years if studying part-time). This will be capped at £9,500.  

For more information please contact: athenaswan@bangor.ac.uk

UK Students (excluding students from Wales*) may be eligible for a Postgraduate Access Bursary if they were in receipt of one of the following as an undergraduate student during the 2021-22 academic year, or if they were unemployed immediately before starting a postgraduate course at Bangor University:

  • Means Tested Maintenance Grant
  • Means Tested Maintenance Loan
  • an Estrangement Bursary
  • a Care Leavers Bursary
  • Job Seekers Allowance / Income Support / Universal Credit

Students must be able to provide evidence that they were in receipt of one these grants, bursaries or benefits.

A bursary of £500 will be awarded to:

  • students who as an undergraduates in 2021-22 received the maximum means tested funding.
  • students who were unemployed immediately before starting their postgraduate studies.

A bursary of £250 will be awarded:

  • to students who as an undergraduate in 2021-22 received a partial means tested funding.

For more information and to request and application form, contact the Money Support Unit.

*Students from Wales are entitled to a minimum £1,000 grant from the Welsh Government.

 

These awards are aimed specifically at widening access to full and part-time postgraduate Masters courses. Click here for more information.

Bangor's Sports Scholarship scheme aims to recognise and support sporting excellence and achievement. The Scholarships, which are worth up to £3,000 a year, aren't limited to any particular sport or to students on any specific courses.

More information

HEFCW Funded MScRes Studentships

Opportunity to apply for fully funded MSc by Research studentships.  Potential project details are provided below.  Successful applications will start on 1 October on a full-time basis.  The funding will cover fees, £16,000 stipend and bench fee for research/training etc. up to £5,000 and is open to home and international applicants. 


Please contact the project supervisor for more information on how to apply.  Contact details may be found within the project descriptions.

The deadline for application is 31 July 2022.

 

Project outline: 
Offshore windfarms will be developed at an accelerated schedule under fast-track plans to switch away from fossil fuels. When natural currents in the sea deviate around the wind turbines or anchors, the forces acting on the bed enhance, making sediments move and stay in suspension. The climate crisis will stretch impacts even further and into coastal zones, as future storm waves and rising sea levels will alter the ways energy from the sea is transferred to the seabed. The seabed supports ecosystems that deliver a wide range of services including fishing, carbon storage, aggregates and coastal protection. With ever larger offshore windfarms, and the interactive effects of climate change, we thus urgently need to understand the way the seabed is modified in response. 
We need to establish a baseline before windfarms are installed, to understand how the seabed is modified today. We have a growing dataset to address this, so we are looking for a marine (geo-) scientist or physical oceanographer to numerically investigate acoustic water column data and linking it with suspended sediment concentrations.  
This knowledge will help windfarm developers make decisions regarding turbine and cable locations, and the successful student will benefit hugely by being part of this large network of researchers across several HE and non-HE institutions, including several windfarm developers, the National Oceanography Centre and HR Wallingford.  
 
Project supervisors: 
Chris Unsworth, Martin Austin and Katrien Van Landeghem
 
Email: 
christopher.unsworth@bangor.ac.uk

 

Supervisor: Dr Hafiz Ahmed (e-mail: hafiz.ahmed@bangor.ac.uk) 
Co-Supervisors: Dr Iestyn Pierce and Dr Sujan Rajbhandari 
Industry Partner: Assystem UK 
 
Overview: Small modular reactor (SMR) is an innovative low-carbon nuclear energy technology that will generate a £250 billion export market with creation of up to 40,000 high-value jobs, according to the UK government. To exploit the enormous potential of SMR, the technology needs to be safe, secure, and reliable like other conventional energy sources. The UK SMR technology is based on the pressurised water reactor (PWR). Conventionally, analogue instrumentation and control (I&C) systems are used for the large-scale PWR nuclear power plant. Unlike conventional PWR, SMR will be controlled through digital I&C systems. The adoption of digital I&C makes SMRs potentially vulnerable to cyberattacks. This necessitates the development of real-time network intrusion detection method which will ensure safe and secure operation of SMR. This Master by Research project will develop such an algorithm by fusing both data-driven and model-based approach. For this purpose, Asherah Nuclear Simulator, which is a hypothetical PWR simulator, will be used as the hardware-in-the-loop testbench. The results obtained in this project will contribute towards enhancing cyber resilience of SMR and expedite industry adoption. 
Requirement: The ideal candidate will have a bachelor’s degree in engineering with exposure to instrumentation and control systems. Previous experience with real-time control hardware, industrial communication, programmable logic controller, machine learning etc. will be advantageous.
 

There are several reconstructions of how Earth looked in its past, with some going back 1500 Myr. However, the various products look very different for some deep-time slices, and it is difficult to ascertain which is the most accurate. This matters, because deep-time topography is key for simulations of past climate and ocean circulation patterns and the affects they may have on other Earth system processes, including extinction and evolution events. Here, we will test the idea that numerical tidal model simulations can be used to validate tectonic reconstructions, because the tides are sensitive to continental configuration. Using reconstructions from Blakey, Scotese, and Muller, we will simulate the tides for five selected time slices (630, 400, 150, 90, and 55 Ma). We will then use existing tidal proxies from these periods to evaluate which reconstruction give the best model results when compared to the proxies. The time slices are selected because there are tidal proxies available for them and because the cover key events in Earth’s history: supercontinent breakup, the radiation of terrestrial vertebrates, a supertidal maximum, and a greenhouse world. The numerical model can then be tuned using standard techniques to see if the model accuracy, again compared to the proxies, can be improved. The project will give a strong skill set in deep time Earth system dynamics, including tectonics, tidal science, and working with model data. Supervisor: Prof Mattias Green (m.green@bangor.ac.uk) https://www.bangor.ac.uk/staff/ocean-sciences/mattias-green-009325/en  
The tide is a key process in the Earth system as it sustains ocean primary production and the climate-regulating overturning circulation. The drag introduced by the tides is a first-order controller of the orbits of the Earth–Moon system, resulting in a change in daylength over time which allowed for the oxygenation of the atmosphere. Constraining deep-time tides is therefore key for our understanding of the evolution of the Earth system at a range of scales. The tides for a few time periods have been constrained by a combination of numerical models and geological proxies. We recently sampled a Carboniferous (318 Myr old) outcrop in Pembrokeshire which contains clear influence from the tide in the form of mm-scale laminations, and another nearby outcrop from the same period is waiting to be visited. Here, the data will be used to develop a new type of tidal proxy based on the cyclicity and sedimentological structures laid down in the rocks by the tide. We will then collate further information about Carboniferous tidal proxies from the literature and sample and analyse the second outcrop in Pembrokeshire and feed the data into a tidal proxy database under development. The data will be used to validate and tune numerical tidal model simulations for the period. The project provides a unique combination of sedimentology and oceanography and working with field- and numerical model data. Supervisor: Prof Mattias Green (m.green@bangor.ac.uk) https://www.bangor.ac.uk/staff/ocean-sciences/mattias-green-009325/en
Supervisors: Dr Amy Ellison, Dr Aaron Comeault, Dr Owen Osborne Website: meeb.bangor.ac.uk Contact for enquiries: a.ellison@bangor.ac.uk Project description: Microbial communities (microbiomes) play important roles in ecosystem services, disease, and plant and animal health. For example, the amphibian skin microbiome represents a first line of defense against infections, including the devastating fungal skin pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). Growing evidence indicates amphibian skin microbiomes influence Bd susceptibility and disease outcomes. However, while metabarcoding and culture-dependent assays have revealed putative bacterial taxa capable of inhibiting Bd infections, the molecular mechanisms of these antagonistic interactions remain poorly understood. This project will leverage recent advances in long-read sequencing (Oxford Nanopore Technology) to sequence the skin microbiome of the poison frog Dendrobates tinctorius and assess functional differences in microbiomes between host lineages. By generating complete “metagenome assembled genomes” of the microbes that comprise the skin microbiome we will explore whether closely related microbial taxa (lumped together as the same taxonomic unit with traditional 16S gene barcoding) in fact differ in the genes that play a role in host disease resistance. Results from this project will therefore inform our understanding of functional links between evolution within the microbiome and host disease resistance. This MScRes will provide the student with highly sought-after skills that include molecular biology, bioinformatics and applied microbiology.
In this project you will investigate the genetic basis of adaptation in extinct Pleistocene cave bears. In recent years, ancient DNA and palaeogenomics have provided countless new insights into the population histories and ecology of long extinct species like mammoths and sabretooth cats. However, very few studies have investigated the genetic basis of adaptations in these unique and iconic animals. You will analyse high coverage paleogenome data from extinct cave bears, to look for genes under selection and hence discover the genetic basis of their unique adaptations. Cave bears went extinct around 25,000 years ago, leaving behind a massive fossil record in the caves they utilised for hibernation. In contrast to their living relatives, brown bears and polar bears, cave bears were strictly herbivorous. They were also much larger and possessed unique dental morphologies thought to be suited to their plant-based diet. You will identify the genes underlying these unique characteristics that defined the extinct cave bear. The project is largely computational and will suit candidates with any of the following interests: evolutionary genetics, bioinformatics, comparative genomics, palaeontology and mammal evolution. For further information please contact the supervisors. Supervisors: Dr. Axel Barlow (a.barlow@bangor.ac.uk), Alexander Papadopulos (a.papadopulos@bangor.ac.uk)
Supervisors: Dr. Kirsty MacLeod (k.macleod@bangor.ac.uk) & Dr. Aaron Comeault (a.comeault@bangor.ac.uk) Short Description: Invasive species are one of the leading causes of anthropogenic biodiversity loss. Nevertheless, we still know relatively little about why some species can successfully invade novel regions while others cannot. One possibility is that the genetic mixing of previously isolated source populations generates phenotypes better suited to a wider range of environments. This project will use populations of the common wall lizard (Podarcis muralis) that have been introduced to the southern United Kingdom to explore the consequences of admixture on phenotypes and fitness. Populations of P. muralis in the UK were founded by individuals from locations in both western and eastern Europe (Michaelides et al. 2015), and therefore represent a natural experiment that can be leveraged to test the phenotypic consequences of hybridisation and admixture on the evolution of traits relevant to the success of invasive species. The student working on this project will use a combination of field- and lab-based data collection to ask whether admixture has contributed to the successful adaptation of thermal performance traits among UK populations of P. muralis. We are looking for a student with strong interests in eco-physiology, behaviour, and/or genetics. Skills gained on this project will include field-based physiological and behavioural data collection and analysis, and genetic data collection and analysis. Recommended reading: Michaelides et al. 2015, “Widespread primary, but geographically restricted secondary, human introductions of wall lizards, Podarcis muralis” Molecular Ecology, 24(11):2702-2714.

Supervisors:

Dr. Wolfgang Wuster (w.wuster@bangor.ac.uk)
Dr. Axel Barlow (a.barlow@bangor.ac.uk)

Project outline:

European vipers (genus Vipera) display puzzling variation in venom composition. In particular, seemingly random populations of several species secrete venoms containing potent neurotoxins. The origins of these neurotoxins remain shrouded in mystery. Horizontal gene transfer resulting from past interspecific hybridisation has been suggested as a cause, but without clear evidence that this actually occurred. In recent years, genomics studies of animals have revealed that gene flow (or hybridisation) between distinct species has occurred much more frequently than previously assumed. However, the adaptive consequences of this widespread hybridisation are still not fully understood. In this project, you will test the hypothesis that the seemingly random occurrence of neurotoxicity among species and populations of European vipers is a result on interspecies hybridisation. You will sequence whole genome data from European viper species, reconstruct their molecular phylogeny and test for evidence of past hybridisation among them. Screening genomes for the presence of neurotoxin genes will then allow you test the extent that their presence and absence can be explained by transfer during hybridisation events. This project involves laboratory work (DNA extraction, PCR) and bioinformatic analysis using high performance computing systems. It would suit students with an interest in herpetology, phylogenetics, venom evolution, genomics, and/or bioinformatics. For further information please contact the supervisors.

Project Outline: Hydrological models are essential tools for simulating streamflow in river basins and are widely used for forecasting floods and droughts. However, appropriate application of hydrological models requires a priori calibration of parameters using historical measured streamflow data, which is not available in all river basins. To make matters worse, previous research has shown that hydrological model parameters are not strongly correlated to the physical properties of river basins (e.g., topography, soils, land use). This limits the ability to regionalise hydrological models, i.e., estimate model parameters at ungauged river basins or modify parameter values if land use changes in a river basin. Recent advances in Artificial Intelligence (AI) have resulted in the ability to provide efficient high-dimensional interpolators that can handle data of multiple dimensions and heterogeneous information, such as those encountered in hydrological modelling. Here, we propose a novel use of AI and information visualization to relate hydrological model parameters to river basin properties. Multiple AI algorithms will be tested to extract high level abstractions of hydrological model and physical river basin data. These abstractions will enable rapid testing of streamflow predictions at ungauged river basins and help understand the impact of land use change on flood risk. Our training dataset will include data from more than 500 river basins across Great Britain. Supervisors: Dr Sopan Patil and Dr Panagiotis Ritsos Email: s.d.patil@bangor.ac.uk Web: https://www.bangor.ac.uk/staff/natural-sciences/sopan-patil-096948/en
Description: High entropy oxides may prove to be a golden bullet for thermal barrier coatings, enabling higher temperature operation of jet engines and armour for fusion power plants allowing plentiful low carbon energy to be produced in the same manner the sun produces energy. The project will be a combination of experiment and modelling studies producing novel high entropy oxide materials in the state-of-the-art laboratories at Bangor University, testing their thermal conductivity and then modelling the results using trail-blazing modelling methods spearheaded by experts within the group. The project will allow development of laboratory and computer modelling skills, whilst providing the student with ample opportunity to work with industry and national laboratories in the UK and internationally. Supervisors: Prof Simon Middleburgh (s.middleburgh@bangor.ac.uk) Dr Michael Rushton (m.rushton@bangor.ac.uk)
Supervisor name: Darren J. Parker, email: d.parker@bangor.ac.uk, website: http://genestobehaviour.co.uk In sexual species males and females typically have different optimal values for a wide range of phenotypes. Both sexes also share a common genome, setting the stage for intra-locus sexual conflict whereby alleles beneficial for one sex are deleterious to the other. Such intra-locus sexual conflict is expected to be pervasive and act to constrain the evolution of sexual dimorphism. Despite this we know little about the amount of intra-locus sexual conflict present in natural populations nor the genes underlying such conflicts. The aim of this project is to identify genes that show evidence of sexual conflict using genomic data from individuals sampled from a natural population of Timema stick insects. Students will be taught to use UNIX, R/python to process and analyse sequence data, analyse and interpret population genetic statistics, and to perform data visualisation. Experience in UNIX and R/Python programming would be helpful, but is not essential, as guidance and baseline code will be given.
Supervisor name: Darren J. Parker, email: d.parker@bangor.ac.uk, website: http://genestobehaviour.co.uk For many organisms the ability to cold acclimate with the onset of seasonal cold has major implications for their fitness. In insects, where this ability is widespread, the physiological changes associated with increased cold tolerance have been well studied. Despite this, little work has been done to understand the underlying genetic basis of cold tolerance and whether it differs between species. The aim of this project is to identify genes that change in expression due to cold in different species of Drosophila, using genomic and RNA-seq data. Students will be taught to use UNIX and R/python to process and analyse sequence data, analyse and interpret population genetic statistics, and to perform data visualisation. Experience in UNIX and R/Python programming would be helpful, but is not essential, as guidance and baseline code will be given.
“Nature based solutions” to climate change, such as planting or protecting trees to store carbon, are seen as having significant potential globally, including in the UK. However, critics are concerned about the potential effects on local communities, especially where they lack decision making rights over land important for their livelihoods and wellbeing. In the global south, this has led to fears of carbon-financed ‘land grabs’, while in the UK, controversy has surrounded the sale of agricultural land for carbon offset forestry, and the role of public policy in incentivising such acquisitions. Meanwhile, governments across the UK are developing ways to give communities more rights to buy land, often with public money. These two agendas have potential for both synergy and conflict, with their impacts reflected in the market values for land. Since market values for land are heavily influenced by public policy, including tax regimes, farm subsidies and the rules governing carbon markets, and may therefore lead to policy initiatives effectively competing for the same land and significant inflation of land prices. This project will explore determinants of agricultural land value in Wales and the associated impacts on local communities and land values of different policy approaches. The research will inform optimal approaches to land-use post-Brexit, including the appropriate mix of landownership (private, public and community) and land use for delivering public goods from land in the C21st, in Wales and beyond. Main contact: Dr Neal Hockley (n.hockley@bangor.ac.uk), Dr Rhys ap Gwilym (Bangor Business School) and Dr Ashley Hardaker.
Supervisors: Dr. Aaron Comeault (a.comeault@bangor.ac.uk) & Dr. Alex Papadopulos (a.papadopulos@bangor.ac.uk) Project Description: A hallmark of biodiversity in the Anthropocene is that human activities are moving species into novel environments and altering biological communities around the world. When a species is introduced into a novel environment it interacts with myriad novel abiotic and biotic features of that environment, thereby setting the stage for evolutionary change such as local adaptation and speciation. However, we still lack a general understand of how frequently different populations of introduced species evolve along diverging evolutionary trajectories. This fact limits our understanding of biodiversity change in the Anthropocene. The student working on this project will study multiple (distantly related) introduced species, measuring levels of reproductive isolation between populations introduced into different environments, to test how frequently introduced species evolve novel reproductive behaviours. By combining phenotypic measurements of reproductive isolation with genomic data quantifying levels of genetic differentiation, our results will inform our understanding of how introduced species can act as a source of “new biodiversity”. Over the course of this project the student will gain valuable experience in areas including experimental design, phenotypic measurements, genetics, and bioinformatics.
Supervisors: Dr. Aaron Comeault (a.comeault@bangor.ac.uk) & Dr. Justin Yeager (Universidad de Las Américas, Ecuador) Project Outline: This project will use the poison frog Oophaga sylvatica from the Ecuadorian Andes as a model to understand behavioural and physiological responses to climate change. Tropical ectotherms tend to experience temperatures closer to their thermal maximum than their temperate counterparts (Deutsch et al. 2008). As such, climate change in the tropics is likely to generate “thermal mismatch” between ambient climate and a species’ climatic tolerance. Thermal mismatch can have a wide range of consequences, ultimately contributing to species’ extinctions (Cohen et al. 2019). Many O. sylvatica populations persist in fragmented forest patches, the last refugia amongst vast plantations of African Palm. We will leverage variation in the thermal environment across forest types to test behavioural and genetic responses to thermal mismatch. Students will collect behavioural and RNA sequence data to quantify changes in gene expression across habitats, including how climate change affects expression of genes associated with stress. Together, these data will help us predict how tropical ectotherms might respond to climate change and contribute to conservation initiatives. We are looking for a student with strong interests in the intersection of ecology and evolution, and adaptation to climate change, willing to conduct tropical fieldwork. The student will gain valuable experience in collecting and analysing behavioural and genetic data. Background literature: Deutsch et al. (2008) “Impacts of climate warming on terrestrial ectotherms across latitude” in PNAS; Cohen et al. (2019) “An interaction between climate change and infectious disease drove widespread amphibian declines” in Global Change Biology.
Supervisor: Dr John Mulley Email: j.mulley@bangor.ac.uk Web: www.johnmulley.com Twitter: @JohnMulley There are two species of moth in North-West Wales which are found nowhere else in the UK, Weaver’s Wave (Welsh: ton Gwynedd), Idaea contiguaria britanniae and Ashworth’s Rustic (Welsh: gwladwr Cymreig), Xestia ashworthii. These populations are likely relics of a wider distribution, and their current distribution in mountainous areas suggests that they may be cold-adapted. Such populations are extremely susceptible to climate change, as they cannot easily shift their range to more hospitable areas, and small isolated populations typically have low levels of genetic diversity as a result of founder effects, inbreeding, and the lack of new alleles through gene flow via migrant animals. These Welsh moths are therefore under a variety of pressures, and their limited range and potentially low genetic diversity may render them unable to cope with our rapidly changing climate. The project will include field sampling across the current range of these species; identification of historical samples in UK and European museums; and lab-based determination of current and historical levels of genetic diversity to shed light on what is going on with these species, and what pressures they might be under as our climate changes.
Project outline: Population genomics analysis of primates has lagged behind other mammalian taxa due to the difficulty in obtaining high quality tissues for DNA sequencing. In this project, you will generate whole-genome data from noninvasive field-collected faecal samples from Zanzibar red colobus monkeys. Using these data, you will assess the extent population structuring and gene flow among groups of colobus living in different habitats. It will further be possible to extract information on individual diets and gut microbiomes, which may show between-habitat differences. This project involves laboratory work (DNA extraction) and bioinformatic analysis using high performance computing systems. It would suit students with an interest in primatology, population genetics, genomics, and/or bioinformatics. Apart from making an important contribution to the field of primate genomics, you work will be a cruicial addition to out knowledge of this endemic, endangered and under-studied species of primate. For further information please contact the supervisors. Supervisors: Dr. Axel Barlow (a.barlow@bangor.ac.uk), Dr. Alexander Georgiev (a.georgiev@bangor.ac.uk)  
A substantial portion of Earth's habitable land mass is covered by rangelands i.e. dominated by native grasses, shrubs or dispersed trees that are grazed by domestic livestock and/or wild animals. More than half of the global meat production comes from these areas and up to 2 billion people rely on them for their livelihood. Rangelands provide a multitude of ecosystem services and are home to numerous species of conservation concern. Thus, as rangelands are threatened worldwide by overgrazing, encroachment and climate change there is a growing need to identify which species are restricted to this habitat. Based on the rangelands’ social-ecological typology suggested by Engler et al. (2018), we plan to carry out a global spatial analysis to identify which bird species have their range restricted to rangeland ecosystems. The study will use spatial analysis techniques applied to large biodiversity and environmental datasets. The project will include further analysis to recognize patterns and priorities in the species’ conservation status. We are looking for a committed and independent student to undertake this project as a Master by research (MSc Res) at Bangor University under the supervision of Dr Simon Valle and Dr Matt Geary (University of Chester). Applicants are required to: have a minimum of a 2:1 Honours Degree in a relevant discipline, be confident and proficient in running spatial analysis on large data sets and be competent at scientific writing. Previous knowledge of bird ecology and conservation is desirable but not necessary. If interested please contact s.valle@bangor.ac.uk by 20th July. Engler et al. 2018. Journal of Arid Environments, 148:65-73.
Project Outline: This project focusses on 30 coral cores recently collected from the central Indian Ocean, extracted from large boulder corals which contain annual growth banding patterns, analogous to tree rings. Emerging techniques will utilise medical CT scanning facilities to enable the growth axis for each core to be visualized, and the variation in skeletal density to be quantified. The main aim of this project will be to measure extension and growth rates within the coral core collection, examining for the presence of high density “stress banding” associated with high sea-surface temperature anomalies during the 2014 to 2017 global coral bleaching event. The results from this piece of work would inform our understanding of coral response to bleaching events and capacity to adapt over repeated exposure to thermal stress events. This is important in the context of increased tropical sea-surface temperatures predicted under global climate change scenarios, and the findings will constitute a high-impact publishable dataset. The project will involve collaboration with colleagues working in skeletal imaging techniques at the University of Kiel and the Natural History Museum, London. Supervisor: Dr. Ronan Roche, Prof. John Turner Email: r.roche@bangor.ac.uk https://research.bangor.ac.uk/portal/en/researchers/ronan-roche(cd2f64cb-375c-46af-beb4-bc5ace97b877).html
Project outline: Bivalve aquaculture suffers from mass mortalities, particularly under stress. Entire batches of larvae can be lost, affecting commercial operations. This can be dealt with by deep cleaning or antibiotics to treat bacterial pathogens, but is not always successful. This project will investigate the use of bacteriophages to prevent and mitigate oyster mortality as part of the Native Oyster Aquaculture Research (NOAR) project at Bangor University. The cause of these mass mortalities is under investigated and poorly understood. Improved understanding of these events and treatments will allow the shellfish industry to reduce mortality. Our preliminary investigations have revealed the presence of high numbers of Vibrio spp. associated with these mortality events. Vibrio spp have previously been implicated in mass mortality events in bivalve cultures [Pers.Communication]. The presence of Vibrio spp. represents a smoking gun, but it is yet to be determined if they caused the oyster larvae mortality. During this project the student will: 1. Investigate the bacteria associated with oyster larvae mass mortality. a. Isolate and culture bacteria. b. Identify bacteria using molecular methods (e.g. PCR, sequencing). c. Confirm if they cause oyster larvae mortality through pathogenicity testing. 2. Investigate the use of phages to kill these pathogens and reduce mass mortality. a. Isolate phages against the bacteria from (1). b. Sequence phages to screen for genes encoding toxins, etc. c. Test the virulence of different phages against the cultured bacteria isolated from (1). d. Test the usefulness of phages against antibiotics in larvae cultures. Supervisor names: Ellie Jameson, Shelagh Malham e-mail: e.jameson@bangor.ac.uk
Project outline: A key challenge for sustainable agricultural production is how best to mitigate emission of nitrous oxide (N2O), a powerful greenhouse gas and ozone depleting substance released from soil. Fungi play key roles within decomposition and nutrient cycling within soils, yet this entire kingdom of life is often overlooked when assessing the factors which regulate emissions of N2O from soil and in the design of mitigation strategies at improving agricultural sustainability. This project will investigate the fungal and bacterial contribution to N2O emissions across a lowland-upland transect which spans different grassland management intensities and fungal-to-bacterial ratios. In addition to the general fungal community, there is opportunity to explore how mycorrhizal fungal partners influence soil N2O emissions along this transect. We are seeking a highly motivated graduate with a keen interest in soils, fungi, greenhouse gas emissions and sustainability. If the project is successful, the candidate would join the Ecosystems and Environment research group within the Environment Centre Wales and receive training in techniques in soil biogeochemistry and in monitoring gaseous emissions from soil. Please send your CV to the contact email address below as soon as possible if this is the opportunity for you and don’t hesitate to ask for further details. Supervisors: Dr Kara Marsden (primary supervisor) https://www.bangor.ac.uk/staff/natural-sciences/karina-marsden-062476/en Prof. Dave Chadwick (secondary supervisor) https://www.bangor.ac.uk/staff/natural-sciences/dave-chadwick-089544/en Contact email for enquiries: k.marsden@bangor.ac.uk Recommended reading Castellano-Hinojosa, A., Le Cocq, K., Charteris, A.F., Abadie, M., Chadwick, D.R., Clark, I.M., González-López, J., Bedmar, E.J. and Cardenas, L.M., 2021. Relative contributions of bacteria and fungi to nitrous oxide emissions following nitrate application in soils representing different land uses. International Biodeterioration & Biodegradation, 159, p.105199. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0048969719337271 Maeda, K., Spor, A., Edel-Hermann, V., Heraud, C., Breuil, M.C., Bizouard, F., Toyoda, S., Yoshida, N., Steinberg, C. and Philippot, L., 2015. N2O production, a widespread trait in fungi. Scientific reports, 5(1), pp.1-7. https://www.nature.com/articles/srep09697 Ma, W.K., Farrell, R.E. and Siciliano, S.D., 2008. Soil formate regulates the fungal nitrous oxide emission pathway. Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 74(21), pp.6690-6696. https://journals.asm.org/doi/full/10.1128/AEM.00797-08 Storer, K., Coggan, A., Ineson, P. and Hodge, A., 2018. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi reduce nitrous oxide emissions from N2O hotspots. New Phytologist, 220(4), pp.1285-1295. https://nph.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/nph.14931
We are looking for an eager and talented student to join us to carry out a research project on the bird-plant interactions in tropical dry forests in southern Ecuador. The aim is to identify the effects of forest degradation on bird communities and understand possible cascading effects on lower trophic interactions. The research will be carried out as a Master of Science by Research (MSc Res) degree at Bangor University and is part of an ongoing international collaboration between Dr Simon Valle, Dr Lars Markesteijn (also at Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Spain) and Dr Carlos Iván Espinosa Íñiguez (Universidad Tecnica Particular de Loja, Ecuador). Although the student will be analysing and interpreting data which has been already collected by our Ecuadorian partners, they will spend a period of training, collaboration and gaining field experience at the UTPL in Ecuador, where the student will also have the opportunity to fine-tune and develop the research topic in line with their research preferences. This is an excellent opportunity for a recent graduate to improve their analysis skills, gain an MSc degree, (co)author a peer-reviewed publication in a leading journal, expand their collaborative network and generally kickstart a career in tropical ecology. We are looking for someone who has a keen interest and understanding of ecology as well as good analysis skills using R. Please note that funding is granted on a competitive basis. If interested please contact s.valle@bangor.ac.uk or l.markesteijn@bangor.ac.uk by the 20th of July.
Growing evidence suggests that anthropogenic disturbance from widespread recreational activities such as hiking and dog walking can have a lasting impact on the behaviour of some animal species, individual fitness and even population dynamics. Nonetheless, few studies have succeeded in quantifying how specific behavioural responses (e.g. vigilance) are shaped by different forms of disturbance, as well as identifying the environmental and population parameters that may compound or mitigate such responses. Building upon previous research in this field, we are planning a research project investigating anthropogenic noise disturbance on Oystercatchers (Haematopus ostralegus) at their roosts in North Wales. The research will make use of rigorous playback experiments to reliably isolate and quantify the effects of specific forms of anthropogenic activity under varying environmental conditions. This constitutes a novel approach in this kind of study and the results of this research have the potential to have a broad conservation and management relevance. We are looking for an enthusiastic, committed and independent student to undertake the above research project as a Masters by research (MSc Res) under the supervision of Dr Simon Valle, Dr Graeme Shannon and Dr Katherine Jones at Bangor University. Applicants are required to have a minimum of a 2:1 Honours Degree in a relevant biological discipline, such as ecology, zoology, conservation biology, or animal behaviour. They should be confident with study design, fieldwork, data analysis in R and scientific writing. Previous knowledge of bird identification is not necessary. If interested please contact s.valle@bangor.ac.uk or g.shannon@bangor.ac.uk by the 20th July.
Supervisors: Dr Caroline Bettridge (c.bettridge@bangor.ac.uk) & Dr Alexander Georgiev Habitat loss and degradation are the greatest threats to primate populations, yet our understanding of how anthropogenic activity affects nocturnal primates in particular is limited. Many primates exhibit considerable intraspecific variation in ecology across their range, and previous research suggests that galagos are opportunistic generalists in at least some of their habits and so may be able to adjust well to moderate levels of disturbance. However, the degree to which nocturnal primates are affected by different levels and types of human activity is unclear. This project will investigate how two species of nocturnal primate cope with land use change in a human-dominated landscape by employing behavioural and spatial data analysis. Zanzibar is home to two galago species, the small-eared greater galago (Otolemur garnettii) and the Zanzibar galago (Paragalago zanzibaricus) which are found in forest habitats across a range of land use types. The two species have different ecological requirements and therefore may respond differently to human activity. This project will investigate the importance to galagos of proximity to protected forests, whether small forest fragments can support populations, and which anthropogenic changes might pose the greatest threat to nocturnal primates. This project will involve fieldwork in Zanzibar. You will develop skills in censusing techniques for nocturnal primate populations, statistical analysis and interpretation of your field data and the ability to apply insights from these population data to inform primate conservation planning.
UK is leading the development of next generation civil nuclear plants, such as the Gen IV reactor technologies, small and advanced modular reactors, and fusion demo reactors. In order for these technologies to be safe, reliable, and commercially viable, the manufacturing process of the reactor components need to be drastically improved. Advanced manufacturing techniques, such as, Additive Manufacturing (AM), Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP), and Electron Beam (EB) welding are going to play major roles in ensuring the success. One of the major challenges of using these advanced manufacturing techniques in the safety critical nuclear industry is to develop methods to accurately assess the structural integrity of the components manufactured using these techniques. This is because the microstructures and mechanical properties of these materials are often significantly different than the materials manufactured using conventional techniques. Therefore, novel, robust, and experimentally validated material deformation models are required to accurately predict the deformation and damage of advanced manufactured materials for nuclear applications. In this project, the student will develop a new micromechanical model for predicting the deformation and damage of materials manufactured using advanced manufacturing techniques such as AM and HIP. The models will be based on the phase-field and crystal plasticity frameworks. The student will conduct high-fidelity experiments using Bangor university’s newly developed manufacturing, mechanical testing, and microstructural characterisation laboratories. The student will also use UK’s central experimental facilities such as the ISIS neutron diffraction facility to conduct state-of-the-art experiments for model validation. The student will join a world-class research group with state-of-the-art laboratories. Details of the group can be found in https://nubu.nu/ . The student is envisaged to work with a number of our current industrial collaborators such as Rolls Royce, EDF energy and Nuclear advanced forming research centre. The student should ideally have a degree in mechanical / materials / any other relevant engineering course, with excellent academic results and a strong interest in research. Strong programming and computational skills, such as experience with finite element analysis, is desirable. If you are interested in applying, can you please send your CV ASAP to Dr Abdullah Al Mamun, email address abdullah.mamun@bangor.ac.uk  

Supervisor name: Dr. Marielle Smith Email: marielle.smith@bangor.ac.uk Project outline: Tropical forests are being removed and degraded in many different ways, including by fire, logging, forest fragmentation, and overgrazing. However, many areas are naturally regenerating following such disturbances, and these human-modified forests and are increasingly recognised as important for climate change mitigation and biodiversity restoration. We need to develop a detailed understanding of how forests change both as they degrade, but also as they recover. This is critical to being able to predict the forests capable of recovery, versus forests where degradation impacts are so severe that recovery is unlikely. Such information is essential to accurately estimating national carbon budgets, as well as identifying priority areas for restoration and conservation. Forest canopy structure—the size, quantity, and spatial arrangement of trees and all aboveground vegetation—determines many ecosystem properties and functions, such as wildlife habitat, microclimate, and carbon storage. This project will quantify how tropical forest structure changes through degradation and/or recovery trajectories, using ground-based lidar data. The project will involve analysis of lidar data already collected along regeneration chronosequences in the Brazilian Amazon, with the potential for field work to conduct lidar surveys at sites in Brazil or Ecuador. Depending on student interest, the project could be expanded to include additional components such as assessment of how aboveground biomass, tree species composition, leaf functional traits, and / or microclimates alter alongside changes in forest structure.

Supervisor Name: Dr. Michael Rushton; Prof. Simon Middleburgh Email: m.rushton@bangor.ac.uk Project outline: The project will demonstrate the feasibility of packed bed heat-stores using slate-waste as the storage medium. These materials are suitable for heat storage in the 500-900°C temperature range providing low cost energy storage for renewable power (wind and photovoltaic) and to improve the flexibility of advanced nuclear reactors. This studentship will continue an existing work at Bangor University and will provide the opportunity to conduct experiments to guide the design and operation of a large-scale heat store. This practical work will also be complemented by modelling and simulation allowing skills to be developed in the area of energy systems modelling.

Structural Funding 

Knowledge Economy Skills Scholarships (KESS 2) provides opportunities for funded PhD and Research Masters study in collaboration with an active business or company partner. It is supported by European Social Funds (ESF) through the Welsh Government and involves all universities in Wales, led by Bangor University.

Scholarship vacancies can be found here.

External

New Welsh Government Bursaries for Welsh Postgraduates

The aim of the Postgraduate Taught Masters Incentivisation Bursary Scheme is to increase the number of Welsh graduates who remain in, or return to Wales, to study a postgraduate master’s degree. 

These Master’s bursaries will continue to be available for the 2022-23 academic year:
•    A £2,000 STEMM Bursary for graduates of all ages studying a Master’s degree in Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics or Medicine, often referred to as ‘STEMM’ subjects.
•    A £1,000 Welsh Medium Bursary to study through the medium of Welsh. The bursary aims to support the continued development of the Welsh-speaking workforce and help achieve the target of a million Welsh speakers by 2050.
Bursaries are available to full and part time students with part students will receive their bursaries in equal instalments each year of their course.

These Bursaries are not available to Post Graduate students who receive funding from 
•    a healthcare or social work bursary 
•    National Health Service (NHS)
•     Department of Health, Social Services and Public Safety (DHSSPS)
•     Student Awards Agency Scotland (SAAS)
•     The Care Council Wales
•     any allowance, bursary or award made under the KESS 2 Scheme.

Or for :
•    Postgraduate Doctoral degrees;
•    Master’s degrees that are undertaken as an integral part of a Postgraduate Doctoral degree;
•    Postgraduate Certificate (PgCert) or Postgraduate Diploma (PgDip);
•    Postgraduate courses that are funded by undergraduate student finance, such as Initial Teacher Education (ITE), or Integrated Master’s.
 

Application


NO Application required:  All students who are eligible for these bursaries will be contacted directly by the University after registration in the new academic year, with the bursary to be applied as a fee waiver to reduce the cost of your tuition fee in most cases.

For further information contact the Money Support Unit : moneysupport@bangor.ac.uk

New Bursary for Postgraduates over the age of 60

The Welsh Government is funding a new bursary for postgraduate students aged 60+.
•    A £4,000 bursary for people over the age of 60. The grant aims to provide additional support for students over 60, who are currently unable to access the same financial support as younger students due to HM Treasury restrictions.
Bursaries are available to full and part time students with part students will receive their bursaries in equal instalments each year of their course.

These Bursaries are not available to Post Graduate students who receive funding from 
•    a healthcare or social work bursary 
•    National Health Service (NHS)
•     Department of Health, Social Services and Public Safety (DHSSPS)
•     Student Awards Agency Scotland (SAAS)
•     The Care Council Wales
•     any allowance, bursary or award made under the KESS 2 Scheme.
Or for :
•    Postgraduate Doctoral degrees;
•    Master’s degrees that are undertaken as an integral part of a Postgraduate Doctoral degree;
•    Postgraduate Certificate (PgCert) or Postgraduate Diploma (PgDip);
•    Postgraduate courses that are funded by undergraduate student finance, such as Initial Teacher Education (ITE), or Integrated Master’s.

Application 
NO Application required:  All students who are eligible for these bursaries will be contacted directly by the University after registration in the new academic year, with the bursary to be applied as a fee waiver to reduce the cost of your tuition fee in most cases.
For further information contact the Money Support Unit : moneysupport@bangor.ac.uk

Fitness Savvy Scholarships

Further information

Leverhulme Trade Charities Trust Postgraduate Bursaries

Further information

Alternative Guide to Postgraduate Funding

The Alternative Guide to Postgraduate Funding Online is all about alternative sources of funding - especially charities - which can make awards (fees, maintenance, research costs) to any student regardless of subject or nationality.

The Alternative Guide Online contains a huge database of funding opportunities, comprehensive guidance, and numerous tools to help you prepare a winning grant application. To assist our students, Bangor University has purchased a licence to the Guide, and so it’s free for all Bangor students and staff to use! Login Now!

If you are a prospective student who has applied to Bangor University, please email to get an access PIN.

FindaMasters.com Scholarship

Masters scholarship on offer from FindAMasters.com. Available for all subject areas at any university currently listed on FindAMasters.com. Register now.

FindaPhD.com Scholarship

PhD scholarship on offer from FindAPhD.com. Available for all subjects at any university currently listed on FindAPhD.com. Register now.

Other Scholarships and Endowments

Loans

PostgraduateStudentships.co.uk

  • PostgraduateStudentships.co.uk is a website that brings together all the different types of funding for intending postgraduates in one place, so you can view funding from general sources alongside university opportunities and funding.

Postgrad Solutions Bursary

Postgrad Solutions now offer 15 bursaries across a number of subject areas. Click here to apply.

 

Business

 

 

Bangor University’s College of Arts, Humanities and Business (CAHB) invites applications for a one-year studentship for MRes/PhD study commencing in Autumn 2022.

Candidates are invited to apply for funding for EITHER an MRes OR the first year only of a PhD. The funding offered will cover tuition fees and a maintenance stipend (£7,500 tuition fee waiver plus £7,500 stipend) for one year’ full-time study for the academic year 2022-3 only. 

Important: If applying for a PhD candidates must be aware that this studentship will be awarded for the first year of study only. They will be responsible for paying the tuition fees and living costs for the remainder of the course.

Start Date: September 2022 (for MRes) or October 2022 (for PhD)

Open To: Home (UK)

Closing date for applications:  Wednesday, 24 August 2022, 17:00 GMT.

Further information: CAHB 1-year Postgraduate Research Studentship (2022-23)

 

Computer Science and Electronic Engineering

 

 

We currently have a number of fully-funded studentships available. Please check HEFCW Funded MScRes Studentships for further information.

 

Educational Sciences

 

 

The Initial Teacher Education (ITE) Priority Subject Incentive Scheme is a legal scheme made by the Welsh Ministers. The scheme makes provision for eligible students who undertake a postgraduate ITE programme in specified subjects (priority subjects) to access this incentive. Under this scheme an incentive grant of £15,000 is available to all students who meet the eligibility criteria. To be eligible for an ITE priority subject grant, a person must hold a degree qualification of 2.2 or higher and be studying wholly or mainly in one of the following subjects:

  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Design & Technology
  • Information Technology
  • Mathematics
  • Modern Foreign Languages (MFL)
  • Physics
  • Welsh

For full details: https://gov.wales/initial-teacher-education-ite-priority-subject-incentive-guidance-students-2022-2023-html

 

The Iaith Athrawon Yfory Incentive Scheme is an incentive paid to eligible persons who complete an accredited secondary postgraduate ITE programme in Wales that enables them to teach through the medium of Welsh or teach Welsh as a subject.

A total of £5000 for eligible student teachers paid in two instalments:

i. £2,500 for eligible persons on completion of an eligible secondary postgraduate ITE programme in Wales leading to QTS;

ii. £2,500 for eligible persons on successful completion of induction at a maintained Welsh-medium or bilingual secondary school or teaching Welsh in any maintained secondary setting in Wales.

For full details: https://gov.wales/iaith-athrawon-yfory-incentive-scheme-guidance-students-html

 

 

Health

 

 

 

 

 

History, Heritage and Archaeology

 

 

Bangor University’s College of Arts, Humanities and Business (CAHB) invites applications for a one-year studentship for MRes/PhD study commencing in Autumn 2022.

Candidates are invited to apply for funding for EITHER an MRes OR the first year only of a PhD. The funding offered will cover tuition fees and a maintenance stipend (£7,500 tuition fee waiver plus £7,500 stipend) for one year’ full-time study for the academic year 2022-3 only. 

Important: If applying for a PhD candidates must be aware that this studentship will be awarded for the first year of study only. They will be responsible for paying the tuition fees and living costs for the remainder of the course.

Start Date:September 2022 (for MRes) or October 2022 (for PhD)

Open To: Home (UK)

Closing date for applications:  Wednesday, 24 August 2022, 17:00 GMT.

Further information: CAHB 1-year Postgraduate Research Studentship (2022-23)

 

 

Languages, Literature and Linguistics

 

 

Bangor University’s College of Arts, Humanities and Business (CAHB) invites applications for a one-year studentship for MRes/PhD study commencing in Autumn 2022.

Candidates are invited to apply for funding for EITHER an MRes OR the first year only of a PhD. The funding offered will cover tuition fees and a maintenance stipend (£7,500 tuition fee waiver plus £7,500 stipend) for one year’ full-time study for the academic year 2022-3 only. 

Important: If applying for a PhD candidates must be aware that this studentship will be awarded for the first year of study only. They will be responsible for paying the tuition fees and living costs for the remainder of the course.

Start Date:September 2022 (for MRes) or October 2022 (for PhD)

Open To: Home (UK)

Closing date for applications:  Wednesday, 24 August 2022, 17:00 GMT.

Further information: CAHB 1-year Postgraduate Research Studentship (2022-23)

 

 

Law

 

 

Bangor University’s College of Arts, Humanities and Business (CAHB) invites applications for a one-year studentship for MRes/PhD study commencing in Autumn 2022.

Candidates are invited to apply for funding for EITHER an MRes OR the first year only of a PhD. The funding offered will cover tuition fees and a maintenance stipend (£7,500 tuition fee waiver plus £7,500 stipend) for one year’ full-time study for the academic year 2022-3 only. 

Important: If applying for a PhD candidates must be aware that this studentship will be awarded for the first year of study only. They will be responsible for paying the tuition fees and living costs for the remainder of the course.

Start Date:September 2022 (for MRes) or October 2022 (for PhD)

Open To: Home (UK)

Closing date for applications:  Wednesday, 24 August 2022, 17:00 GMT.

Further information: CAHB 1-year Postgraduate Research Studentship (2022-23)

 

 

Media

 

 

MPhil or PhD postgraduate students in the College of Arts, Humanities and Business at Bangor University may be eligible to apply for a travel bursary award during the period of registration in order to attend an academic conference or to make a visit to a relevant academic archive/library.

Each application is assessed on its own merits, and the bursary or bursaries awarded to any single postgraduate will not exceed the sum of £150 in total within any academic year. All enquiries should be directed to the College postgraduate administrator.

 

 

Bangor University’s College of Arts, Humanities and Business (CAHB) invites applications for a one-year studentship for MRes/PhD study commencing in Autumn 2022.

Candidates are invited to apply for funding for EITHER an MRes OR the first year only of a PhD. The funding offered will cover tuition fees and a maintenance stipend (£7,500 tuition fee waiver plus £7,500 stipend) for one year’ full-time study for the academic year 2022-3 only. 

Important: If applying for a PhD candidates must be aware that this studentship will be awarded for the first year of study only. They will be responsible for paying the tuition fees and living costs for the remainder of the course.

Start Date:September 2022 (for MRes) or October 2022 (for PhD)

Open To: Home (UK)

Closing date for applications:  Wednesday, 24 August 2022, 17:00 GMT.

Further information: CAHB 1-year Postgraduate Research Studentship (2022-23)

 

Medical Sciences

 

 

 

 

 

Music

 

 

There are a limited number of internal Music Bursaries, which are open to UK, EU and overseas students. These range in value up to a maximum of £1,000. These bursaries are available on a competitive basis. To apply for a bursary, please can you upload a letter with your application indicating why you would like to be considered. For more information please contact music.pg@bangor.ac.uk.

 

MPhil or PhD postgraduate students in the College of Arts, Humanities and Business at Bangor University may be eligible to apply for a travel bursary award during the period of registration in order to attend an academic conference or to make a visit to a relevant academic archive/library.

Each application is assessed on its own merits, and the bursary or bursaries awarded to any single postgraduate will not exceed the sum of £150 in total within any academic year. All enquiries should be directed to the College postgraduate administrator.

 

 

Bangor University’s Department of Music, Drama and Performance (part of the School of Arts, Culture and Language), invites PhD applications for the Parry Williams Studentship in Music.

The award will offer a bursary of £10,000 per annum for a period of three years as a contribution towards tuition fees and maintenance.

Start Date: October 2022

Open To: Home (UK)

Closing date for applications:  Monday, 15 August 2022, 17:00 GMT.

Further information: Parry Williams Doctoral Studentship in Music 2022-23 - scroll down for English

Bangor University’s College of Arts, Humanities and Business (CAHB) invites applications for a one-year studentship for MRes/PhD study commencing in Autumn 2022.

Candidates are invited to apply for funding for EITHER an MRes OR the first year only of a PhD. The funding offered will cover tuition fees and a maintenance stipend (£7,500 tuition fee waiver plus £7,500 stipend) for one year’ full-time study for the academic year 2022-3 only. 

Important: If applying for a PhD candidates must be aware that this studentship will be awarded for the first year of study only. They will be responsible for paying the tuition fees and living costs for the remainder of the course.

Start Date:September 2022 (for MRes) or October 2022 (for PhD)

Open To: Home (UK)

Closing date for applications:  Wednesday, 24 August 2022, 17:00 GMT.

Further information: CAHB 1-year Postgraduate Research Studentship (2022-23)

 

Natural Sciences

 

 

We currently have a number of fully-funded studentships available. Please check HEFCW Funded MScRes Studentships for further information.

 

Ocean Sciences

 

 

We currently have a number of fully-funded studentships available. Please check HEFCW Funded MScRes Studentships for further information.

2 available in 2022/23
2 available in 2023/24

The Professor Craig Kensler Studentships Postgraduate Taught Programmes cover Tuition fees (Full Time, Home rate) for students on the one year taught MSc programmes in Marine Biology, Marine Environmental Protection, Applied Marine Geosciences, Marine Renewable Energy, Physical Oceanography.

Applicants who have been offered a place or are submitting an application are eligible to apply for the Studentships.  Please submit a CV and 1 page cover letter indicating the research programme applied for and status of application,  to the School of Ocean Sciences Secretary, Laura Brandish Jones  l.brandish@bangor.ac.uk  by 31.07.22.  You are advised to contact the appropriate Course Director of the MSc course applied for, or Supervisor for an MSc by Research indicating  that you intend to apply for the studentship and year of study.

 

2 available in 2022/23
2 available in 2023/24


The Professor Craig Kensler Studentships for Postgraduate Masters Research cover Tuition fees (Full Time, Home rate) for students undertaking an MSc by Research in 2022/23 or 2023/24. 

Applicants who have been offered a place or are submitting an application are eligible to apply for the Studentships.  Please submit a CV and 1 page cover letter indicating the research programme applied for and status of application,  to the School of Ocean Sciences Secretary, Laura Brandish Jones  l.brandish@bangor.ac.uk  by 31.07.22.  You are advised to contact the appropriate Course Director of the MSc course applied for, or Supervisor for an MSc by Research indicating  that you intend to apply for the studentship and year of study.

 

 

 

 

 

Psychology

 

 

Fully funded 3-year PhD studentship (School Funded) -School of Human and Behavioural Sciences, Bangor University, UK
Closing date:  12th September 2022
Dr Ken Valyear

Applications are invited for a three-year PhD studentship within the School of Human and Behavioural Sciences, Bangor University. The studentship is funded by the School and covers the full cost of tuition fees for PhD students, plus a maintenance stipend (approx. £16,062 per annum for 3 years) as well as a generous research allowance of up to £750. The studentship can commence any time between October 2022 and January 2023, but with a preferred start date of October 1st.

More information about mapping the brain changes that follow injury to the nerves of the hand and their functional significance PhD

 

Sport, Health and Exercise Sciences

 

 

Fully funded 3-year PhD studentship (School Funded) -School of Human and Behavioural Sciences, Bangor University, UK
Closing date:12th September 2022

Applications are invited for a three-year PhD studentship within the School of Human and Behavioural Sciences, Bangor University. The studentship is funded by the School and covers the full cost of tuition fees for PhD students, plus a maintenance stipend (approx. £16,062 per annum for 3 years) as well as a generous research allowance of up to £750. The studentship can commence any time between October 2022 and January 2023, but with a preferred start date of October 1st.

More information about mapping the brain changes that follow injury to the nerves of the hand and their functional significance PhD

 

Welsh and Celtic Studies

 

 

Learn Welsh North West, School of Arts, Culture and Language

Title: Factors influencing the success of language acquisition in the workplace

In any workplace we find examples of individuals learning Welsh very successfully and sometimes in a very short space of time.  Similarly, we have cases where individuals find the experience of learning Welsh more challenging. The aim of this research would be to identify features associated with the successful learning and use of Welsh in the workplace.  At the same time, it would look at the characteristics associated with individuals in the workplace who are not so successful in learning and / or using Welsh in the workplace.

Start date: October 2022

Duration: 3 years full time (applications from applicants wishing to receive the scholarship on a part time basis will be considered)

Location: Bangor

Funding for/Open to: UK students, EU students, International students

Funding amount: 3 year PhD scholarship (£16,062 for 2022/23) + additional funding of £500 to support fieldwork, attend conferences or contribute towards other research costs

Hours: Full time (part time hours to be no less than 50%)

Closing date for applications: 12:00 pm 6 July 2022

Ability to write and speak Welsh fluently is essential for this post.

Bangor University’s College of Arts, Humanities and Business (CAHB) invites applications for a one-year studentship for MRes/PhD study commencing in Autumn 2022.

Candidates are invited to apply for funding for EITHER an MRes OR the first year only of a PhD. The funding offered will cover tuition fees and a maintenance stipend (£7,500 tuition fee waiver plus £7,500 stipend) for one year’ full-time study for the academic year 2022-3 only. 

Important: If applying for a PhD candidates must be aware that this studentship will be awarded for the first year of study only. They will be responsible for paying the tuition fees and living costs for the remainder of the course.

Start Date:September 2022 (for MRes) or October 2022 (for PhD)

Open To: Home (UK)

Closing date for applications:  Wednesday, 24 August 2022, 17:00 GMT.

Further information:CAHB 1-year Postgraduate Research Studentship (2022-23)

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