Latest News

Alumnus of the Year 2019

Bangor University has over 80,000 alumni living all over the world, working in every field and industry imaginable. The University is proud of the achievements of its former students and, to highlight this, every year the University’s Alumni Advisory Board chooses an Alumnus of the Year, honouring a graduate who has excelled in his or her field and has remained engaged with their alma mater. Previous Alumnus of the Year recipients include Gwilym Rees-Jones (Maths, 1963), Dr Ross Piper (Zoology, 1998) and Ray Footman (History & Philosophy, 1961).

Publication date: 16 July 2019

Graduation Profile – Sam Hamill

Publication date: 15 July 2019

Back-to-back heatwaves kill more than two-thirds of coral

Study shows severe loss of central Indian Ocean coral reefs between 2015 and 2017

By comparing reefs before and after two extreme heatwaves only 12 months apart, a collaborative team of researchers including scientists from Bangor’s School of Ocean Sciences found that living hard corals in the central Indian Ocean reduced by 70%. Despite this, their results suggest that some coral species are more resilient to rising temperatures, which offers hope for these vital habitats.

Publication date: 12 July 2019

Climate Experts & Local School Children to discuss the Climate Emergency

Pupils from local schools are being welcomed to Bangor University today to attend a Youth Summit on Climate Change. 

Having recently joined with many organisations worldwide in declaring a climate emergency, the University is keen to work on the solution and this must be done in collaboration with the children and young people of Wales. 

Publication date: 5 July 2019

How did the moon end up where it is?

Nearly 50 years since man first walked on the moon, the human race is once more pushing forward with attempts to land on the Earth’s satellite. This year alone, China has landed a robotic spacecraft on the far side of the moon, while India is close to landing a lunar vehicle, and Israel continues its mission to touch down on the surface, despite the crash of its recent venture. NASA meanwhile has announced it wants to send astronauts to the moon’s south pole by 2024.

This article by Mattias Green, Reader in Physical Oceanography, School of Ocean Sciences and David Waltham, Professor of Geophysics, Royal Holloway is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 25 April 2019