Woodland in spring with bluebells out.

MSc Forestry Courses

Course Information for 2024/25

  • Agroforestry & Food Security MSc
  • Environmental Forestry MSc
  • Forestry MSc
  • Tropical Forestry MSc

Apply now 

Forestry is undergoing unprecedented changes in the 21st Century. Rapid population growth, urbanisation, globalisation and climate change place increasing pressures on the world’s forest resources and make forest management ever more challenging. At the same time, forests are increasingly valued for the diverse and essential ecosystem services they provide. Therefore, developing sustainable forest management systems that can deliver multiple ecological, socio-cultural and economic benefits is essential.

Our programmes provide a first-class forestry education to students who wish to develop their existing skills and knowledge in agroforestry, environmental forestry, forestry or tropical forestry, and/or are looking for a career change. The modules cover a broad range of contemporary topics and will enable you to gain a broad and comprehensive understanding of the complex nature of forest ecosystems and their interrelationships with human systems at various scales. The programme is designed to allow students to complete the course full time or part time to enable students to undertake a MSc degree whilst working full time and/or managing other commitments. Postgraduate Certificate and Postgraduate Diploma qualifications are also available for individuals who have interests in specific topics but do not wish to undertake the full MSc.

Laboratory assistant takes a water analysis in a puddle

Research Excellence

We pride ourselves in excellence in teaching, learning and research and we have a high profile and strong reputation in agroforestry, environmental forestry, forestry and tropical forestry in the UK and internationally. If you choose to study at Bangor, you will be studying at a university which is very highly rated for its teaching quality and student experience, being ranked 2nd in the UK for Agriculture and Forestry according to The Times/Sunday Times Good University Guide 2024.

Our School also has a world-class reputation for research; more than 95% of our research was rated as world-leading or internationally excellent in Environmental Sciences in the most recent 2021 Research Excellence Framework assessment of research quality in UK universities.  Of particular relevance to forestry is the applied impact of our research in Environmental Sciences which was ranked in 1st place in the UK in this assessment, with more than 90% of the impact being world-leading.

Forestry @ Bangor

We have been teaching forestry at Bangor for over a century, since 1904. MSc Forestry and related degrees have been taught since 1978, during which time students from more than 100 countries have studied with us. In 2001, we started running MSc level part-time distance learning forestry degrees and these are now widely recognised as the most successful forestry postgraduate taught degrees in the UK. In 2020 we added our Agroforestry and Food Security programme to our Forestry@Bangor distance learning provision. News and developments relating to the distance learning programmes have been published in various media and you can read the dozens of positive testimonials from current distance learning students and alumni.

Bangor forestry alumni are part of the forestry heritage, capacity and expertise of a huge array of countries and organisations. If you study with us, you will soon find that there are Bangor forestry alumni working in a wide range of roles in this diverse profession. We maintain links with many of them in order to enrich our teaching and research. If you become a Bangor 'forester' you have the unique opportunity to become part of this well respected and widely recognised tradition

The forestry@bangor newsletters provide applicants with some insights about what it is like to be a part of the forestry@bangor community.

Study Modes

All four of our forestry programmes are available 'on-campus' for those who wish to study full or part time in Bangor. The 'on-campus' programmes share the same modules as the part-time / distance programmes, reflecting the forestry@Bangor ‘blended learning’ approach.

As one of the most well-established distance learning programmes of its kind, our students and graduates have an increasingly high profile as the reputation of our programmes strengthen. We have been incredibly successful in helping our students either enter forestry and related professions, or gain promotion with their existing employers and / or deepen their areas of expertise. This is evidenced by the success many of our distance learning students and graduates have had in gaining exciting and challenging positions in forestry-related positions worldwide.

Our distance learning programmes are subject to exactly the same quality control procedures that apply to all degree programmes offered by Bangor University and a qualification obtained from our distance learning programme consequently has exactly the same status as one obtained from a full-time residential programme.

All our distance learning programmes have ‘student representatives’ who actively participate (via Teams) in formal University Student: Staff committees, ensuring that our distance learning student cohort has a voice equal to full-time ‘residential’ students.
We make continual updates and improvements and act upon constructive feedback from a range of sources. One focus of recent efforts is to integrate full-time and part-time provision, where possible (there's more information about this in the Programme Structure section below).

Forestry is a long-term business, its history is scattered with examples of forest policy, management and species choices that have not produced the outcomes expected of previous generations of foresters who made those choices, nor the requirements of current or future generations. The nature of forestry and related land management means we have an obligation to serve future generations as best we can. On this programme, you can expect robust debate and engaging discussion about the future of forestry and agroforestry! Members of staff may share contrasting views with you, and you will be encouraged to debate and discuss such issues with fellow students, both online and in person.

Administration Staff

Cherelle Jarvis, Teaching Administrator for distance learning forestry courses

The Teaching Administrator is Cherelle Jarvis.

Please get in touch with Cherelle if you have any questions about the application process, course content and course start dates.  

Telephone: (+44) (0)1248 382351 
E-mail: distance@bangor.ac.uk / c.jarvis@bangor.ac.uk

Teaching Team

Many other staff in the School of Natural Sciences also contribute to the programmes, for example, with the supervision of dissertations or the provision of specific expertise. 

School of Natural Sciences Staff
 

Programme Aims and Modules

Programme Aims

This degree programme is designed to provide students with training in the management of forest resources, understanding of the scientific, academic and practical principles that underpin forest management and forest ecosystem function, and interrelationships between different stakeholders (users/beneficiaries of forested land) and associated land uses.

The overall aim of the programme is to provide an integrated education in forestry, combining ecological, economic and social dimensions of forest sciences, focussed on application to real world systems. Specific objectives are:

  • To develop students' understanding of the biology, domestication and management of trees and the role of human interventions in forestry
  • To develop students' competence in the integration of knowledge and methods from the disciplines of ecology, silviculture, mensuration and resource management to understand real world systems of sustainable forest management
  • To provide flexible learning opportunities for those who have not previously had the chance to undertake higher education in forestry
  • To develop students' intellectual skills, study skills and professional development skills, in a forestry-specific context
  • To provide opportunities for career development for those already working in the forestry profession, and to increase career opportunities for those not in the profession

The programme is designed to be of specific interest to people who are seeking:

  • an academically based education in forestry
  • a career in the management of trees, woodlands and forest resources
  • a career change, perhaps after working in a different sector such as law, medicine, technology, agriculture, etc.
  • to further their knowledge and expertise in order to develop their career, having already gained work experience in forestry or a related profession.

Students benefit from being part of a diverse, inquisitive and motivated cohort and form new friendships as well as professional relationships. We have students who are professionals already employed in forestry related professions (public agencies, private forest management companies, third sector organisations and self-employed consultants), as well as career changers from a wide range of backgrounds (including finance, law, technical sales, graphic design, architecture, healthcare, etc). We also have some students who have retired and wish to study forestry simply out of curiosity and/or their need for a rigorous academic challenge.

Programme Modules

A list of individual modules, including overall aims, learning outcomes, assessments and the name of the module organiser can be found here.

Feel free to contact us if you have any questions about these various options. You will discuss and confirm your modules with the administrator before the course starts.

Watch MSc Forestry video

Programme Aims

We launched our MSc Tropical Forestry programme in 2012, from which more than 100 students have now graduated. Enrolling in this programme offers a unique journey into the exploration and conservation of some of the planet's most biodiverse and ecologically vibrant ecosystems. It provides an opportunity to delve into the understanding and management of these ecosystems, navigating sustainable practices that contribute to mitigating and adapting to the effects of climate change.

The learning experience of this truly international degree is enhanced through the sharing of ideas and insights from students living in a wide variety of tropical forested areas of the world. The Tropical Forestry Study Tour represents the high point of the degree for many; it is where many of the topics covered during the modules are truly ‘brought to life’. It also represents a unique opportunity to meet with fellow students and staff alike, to form new friendships, learn about new cultures, and be able to fully appreciate the global context of tropical forestry. This takes the form of a two-week residential programme, typically in May.

The MSc Tropical Forestry programme is designed to provide students with an understanding of the natural sciences that underpin sustainable tropical forest management and conservation. 

The programme is designed to be of specific interest to:

  • Individuals seeking academically based education in tropical forest sciences
  • Individuals seeking a career in the conservation of tropical trees, woodland and forests
  • Individuals seeking a career in scientific research related to tropical trees, woodlands and forests, including those interested in pursuing doctoral research
  • Individuals working in tropical forestry who wish to further their knowledge and expertise in order to develop their career.

Programme Modules

A list of individual modules, including overall aims, learning outcomes, assessments and the name of the module organiser can be found here.

Feel free to contact us if you have any questions about these various options. You will discuss and confirm your modules with the administrator before the course starts.

Programme Aims

In 2020, MSc Agroforestry & Food Security became the latest programme to join our distance learning provision. Although we have been running an Agroforestry MSc programme for full-time students for over 25 years, we are now in a position to offer this programme to students anywhere in the world.

Our agroforestry approach to food security aims to help meet human food needs from farming systems by taking an integrated view of the ecological, economic and social complexities of these systems. This course will help you gain the specialised education and interdisciplinary training required for a deep and practical understanding of agroforestry systems and their role in local and global food security.

Over the last 25 years, the course has attracted students from more than 30 countries and through our alumni and partners we have strong links with a wide variety of international, regional and national organisations in Africa, Asia, Europe and the Americas. Now with our distance learning provision, we hope to further build our international network and we look forward to you joining our graduates and helping us in our mission of improving natural resource management and food security throughout the world.

As with all our programmes, we hope that students will be able to join one of our study tours. For the MSc Agroforestry & Food Security programme most people will join either our Temperate Study Tour, or our Tropical (agro)Forestry Study Tour, depending on the nature of their funding and access to travel. The tours provide an opportunity to build on the friendships with fellow students and staff, to learn about new cultures, and to see the contribution of agroforestry systems and practices to people’s livelihoods and food security.

The MSc Agroforestry & Food Security programme is designed to provide students with an understanding of the sciences that underpin sustainable food production through agroforestry.

The programme is designed to be of specific interest to:

  • Individuals seeking further academically based higher education in agroforestry and food security sciences
  • Individuals seeking a career in scientific research related to sustainable food production systems, agroforestry, and food security, including those interested in pursuing doctoral research
  • Individuals seeking a career in teaching, training, advising or consultancy role into sustainable food production systems and value chains
  • Individuals seeking a career in sustainable food production.

Programme Modules

A list of individual modules, including overall aims, learning outcomes, assessments and the name of the module organiser can be found here.

Feel free to contact us if you have any questions about these various options. You will discuss and confirm your modules with the administrator before the course starts.

This programme has been running for more than 40 years and is designed to provide students with an understanding of the natural sciences that underpin sustainable forest management and conservation.

The programme is designed to be of specific interest to:

  • Individuals seeking academically based education in forest sciences
  • Individuals seeking a career in the conservation of trees, woodland and forests
  • Individuals seeking a career in scientific research related to trees, woodlands and forests, including those who wish to pursue doctoral study
  • Individuals working in a forest-related sector who wish to further their knowledge and expertise in order to develop their career

The overall aim of the programme is to provide an integrated education in environmental forest science, combining ecological, silvicultural and social dimensions of forest research, focussed on application to real world systems. Specific objectives are:

  • To develop students' competence in the integration of knowledge and methods from the disciplines of ecology, soil science, forest assessment, silviculture and pathology to understand real world systems of sustainable forest management
  • To develop students’ awareness of world forest resources, the ecosystem services that they deliver, how they are changing and related aspects of forest policy
  • To equip students for a career in environmental forestry, research and related professions that require an ability to synthesise concepts and ideas and to take a holistic, system-based, view
  • To develop students' intellectual, practical, numeracy, IT, interpersonal/teamwork, self management and professional development skills, in the context of forestry. 

Programme Modules

A list of individual modules, including overall aims, learning outcomes, assessments and the name of the module organiser can be found here.

Feel free to contact us if you have any questions about these various options. You will discuss and confirm your modules with the administrator before the course starts.

Programme Structure

In common with all taught postgraduate degrees in the United Kingdom, our Forestry@Bangor MSc degree programmes comprise two distinct parts, which make up a total of 180 credits. 

Taught component (120 credits) comprises of modules that are each accompanied by a module handbook and complemented by a range of teaching and learning resources. Modules are 15 credits and typically run over a fixed period and may include both coursework and/or examination(s).  Modules run in a blended format whereby you study alongside full-time/part-time and distance learning postgraduate students. 

Dissertation component (60 credits) comprises a dissertation – an independent research project which is led by the student who works closely with an academic supervisor to conduct their own high-quality postgraduate level research. 

Core modules must be passed with at least 50%.

Applicants not wishing to study for the full MSc can take exit awards of either Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits) or Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits).  

Programme Module Schedules

 

Semester 1 

Semester 2 

 

Block A  

Block B 

Block C 

Block D 

Core  

ENS-4301 Global Food Security (15cr) 

ENS-4305 Agroforestry systems and Practices (15cr)

 

 

ENS-4316 AFFS study tour (15cr) 

or 

ENS-4319 Tropical study tour (15cr)  

Compulsory 

ENS-4302 Fundamentals of Soil and Water (15cr)

 

ENS-4309 Natural Resource Management (15cr)

 

Optional 

 

 

ENS-4306 Silviculture (15cr)

or 

*ENS-4211 Agriculture & Environment (15cr)

ENS-4203 Business Planning for Green Economies (15cr)

or 

ENS-4313 GIS for forestry land management (15cr) 

ENS-4317 Forest ecosystems (15cr)

or 

ENS-4318 Social issues in forest management (15cr)

Core for MSc 

ENS-4321 MSc Dissertation (60cr)  (this is completed over the summer). 

*Currently only offered on-campus in Bangor

Year 1: 90 credits  

 

Semester 1 

Semester 2 

 

Block A  

Block B 

Block C 

Block D 

Core  

ENS-4301 Global Food Security (15cr)

ENS-4305 Agroforestry systems and Practices (15cr)

 

 

ENS-4316 AFFS study tour (15cr)

or 

ENS-4319 Tropical study tour (15cr)

Compulsory  

ENS-4302 Fundamentals of Soil and Water (15cr)

 

ENS-4309 Natural Resource Management (15cr)

 

Optional 

(Pick one from this row) 

 

ENS-4306 Silviculture (15cr)

or 

*ENS-4211 Agriculture & Environment (15cr)

ENS-4203 Business Planning for Green Economies (15cr)

or 

ENS-4313 GIS for forestry land management  (15cr)

ENS-4317 Forest ecosystems (15cr)

or 

ENS-4318 Social issues in forest management (15cr)

*Currently only offered on-campus in Bangor

Year 2: 90 credits  

(modules already taken in year 1 cannot be taken again in year 2. Core and compulsory modules are the default for year 1). 

 

Semester 1 

Semester 2 

 

Block A  

Block B 

Block C 

Block D 

Optional (Pick 2 from this row) 

 

ENS-4306 Silviculture (15cr)

or 

*ENS-4211 Agriculture & Environment (15cr)

ENS-4203 Business Planning for Green Economies (15cr)

or 

ENS-4313 GIS for forestry land management (15cr)

ENS-4317 Forest ecosystems (15cr)

or 

ENS-4318 Social issues in forest management (15cr)

Core for MSc 

ENS-4321 MSc Dissertation (60cr)

*Currently only offered on-campus in Bangor

Year 1: 60 credits 

 

Semester 1 

Semester 2 

 

Block A  

Block B 

Block C 

Block D 

Core  

 

 

ENS-4305 Agroforestry systems and Practices (15cr) 

 

 

ENS-4316 AFFS study tour (15cr) 

or 

ENS-4319 Tropical study tour (15cr)

Compulsory  

ENS-4302 Fundamentals of Soil and Water (15cr) 

 

ENS-4309 Natural Resource Management (15cr)

 

 Year 2: 60 credits

 

Semester 1 

Semester 2 

 

Block A  

Block B 

Block C 

Block D 

Core

ENS-4301 Global Food Security (15cr) 

 

 

 

 

Optional 

 

ENS-4306 Silviculture (15cr) 

or 

*ENS-4211 Agriculture & Environment (15cr) 

ENS-4203 Business Planning for Green Economies (15cr) 

or 

ENS-4313 GIS for forestry land management (15cr)

ENS-4317 Forest ecosystems (15cr)

or 

ENS-4318 Social issues in forest management (15cr)

*Currently only offered on-campus in Bangor.

 Year 3: 60 credits

 

Semester 1 

Semester 2 

 

Block A  

Block B 

Block C 

Block D 

Core for MSc 

ENS-4321 MSc Dissertation (60cr)

 

Semester 1 

Semester 2 

 

Block A 

Block B 

Block C 

Block D 

Core 

 

 

 

ENS-4315 Forestry study tour (15 cr) 

Compulsory 

ENS-4302 Fundamentals of Soil and Water (15 cr) 

 

ENS-4310 Inventory, Assessment and Monitoring (15 cr) 

 

Optional 

ENS-4300 Urban Forestry (15 cr) 

Or 

ENS-4303 Forest ecology* (15 cr) 

ENS-4306  Silviculture (15 cr) 

 

ENS-4307 Ecological Restoration (15 cr) 

ENS-4311 Forest protection (15 cr) 

ENS-4317 Forest ecosystems (15 cr) 

Core for MSc 

 

 

ENS-4321 MSc Dissertation (60 cr) 

*Available only on-campus in Bangor.

Note: the dissertation module is completed over the summer. 

Year 1: 90 credits

 

Semester 1 

Semester 2 

 

Block A 

Block B 

Block C 

Block D 

Core 

 

 

 

ENS-4315 Forestry study tour (15 cr) 

Compulsory 

ENS-4302 Fundamentals of Soil and Water (15 cr) 

 

ENS-4310 Inventory, Assessment and Monitoring (15 cr) 

 

Optional 

(Pick three from this row) 

ENS-4300 Urban Forestry (15 cr) 

Or 

ENS-4303 Forest ecology* (15 cr) 

ENS-4306 Silviculture (15 cr) 

ENS-4311 Forest protection (15 cr) 

ENS-4317 Forest ecosystems (15 cr) 

*Available only on-campus in Bangor.

Year 2: 90 credits  

Modules taken in year 1 cannot be taken again in year 2. Core and compulsory modules are the default for year 1. 

 

Semester 1 

Semester 2 

 

Block A 

Block B 

Block C 

Block D 

Optional 

(Pick two from this row) 

ENS-4300 Urban Forestry (15 cr) 

Or 

ENS-4303 Forest ecology* (15 cr) 

ENS-4306 Silviculture (15 cr) 

Or 

ENS-4307 Ecological Restoration (15 cr)  

ENS-4311 Forest protection (15 cr) 

ENS-4317 Forest ecosystems (15 cr) 

Core for MSc 

ENS-4321 MSc Dissertation (60 cr) 

*Available only on-campus in Bangor.

Year 1: 60 credits 

 

Semester 1 

Semester 2 

 

Block A 

Block B 

Block C 

Block D 

Core 

 

 

 

ENS-4315 Forestry study tour (15 cr) 

Compulsory 

ENS-4302 Fundamentals of Soil and Water (15 cr) 

 

ENS-4310 Inventory, Assessment and Monitoring (15 cr) 

 

Optional 

 

ENS-4306 Silviculture (15 cr)

 

 

 

Year 2: 60 credits  

 

Semester 1 

Semester 2 

 

Block A 

Block B 

Block C 

Block D 

Optional 

 

ENS-4300 Urban Forestry (15 cr) 

Or 

ENS-4303 Forest ecology* (15 cr) 

ENS-4307 Ecological Restoration (15 cr) 

ENS-4311 Forest protection (15 cr)

ENS-4317 Forest ecosystems (15 cr) 

*Available only on-campus in Bangor.

Year 3: 60 credits  

 

Semester 1 

Semester 2 

 

Block A 

Block B 

Block C 

Block D 

Core for MSc 

ENS-4321 MSc Dissertation (60 cr) 

 

Semester 1 

Semester 2 

 

Block A  

Block B 

Block C 

Block D 

Core  

 

ENS-4306 Silviculture (15 cr)

 

 

ENS-4315 Forestry Study Tour (15 cr)

Compulsory  

 

ENS-4304 Forest History, Policy and Management (15 cr) 

AND 

ENS-4300 Urban Forestry (15 cr) 

 

 

 

 

Optional 

 

 

ENS-4307 Ecological Restoration (15 cr) 

or 

ENS-4308 Timber & Wood-Based Products (15 cr) 

 

TWO OF THE FOLLOWING 

ENS-4310 Inventory, Assessment and Monitoring (15 cr) 

 

ENS-4311 Forest protection (15 cr) 

 

ENS-4203 Business Planning for Green Economies (15 cr) 

 

ENS-4313 GIS for forestry land management (15 cr) 

ENS-4314 Forest Management Planning1 (15 cr) 

or 

ENS-4318 Social issues in forest management (15 cr) 

 

Core for MSc 

ENS-4321 MSc Dissertation (60 cr) (this is completed over the summer). 

Year 1: 90 credits 

 

Semester 1 

Semester 2 

 

Block A  

Block B 

Block C 

Block D 

Core 

 

 

ENS-4306 Silviculture (15 cr) 

 

 

ENS-4315 Forestry Study Tour (15 cr)

Compulsory  

ENS-4304 Forest History, Policy & Management (15 cr) 

 

 

 

 

Optional 

 

 

ENS-4307 Ecological Restoration (15 cr) 

or 

ENS-4308 Timber & Wood-Based Products (15 cr) 

 

ENS-4310 Inventory, Assessment & Monitoring (15 cr) 

or 

ENS-4311 Forest protection (15 cr) 

or 

ENS-4203 Business Planning for Green Economies (15 cr) 

or 

ENS-4313 GIS for forestry land management (15 cr)

ENS-4318 Social issues in forest management (15 cr) 

 

 Year 2: 90 credits  

(modules taken in year 1 cannot be taken again in year 2)

 

Semester 1 

Semester 2 

 

Block A  

Block B 

Block C 

Block D 

Compulsory 

ENS-4300 Urban Forestry (15 cr)

 

 

 

 

Optional 

 

 

ENS-4307 Ecological Restoration (15 cr) 

or 

ENS-4308 Timber & Wood-Based Products (15 cr) 

ENS-4310 Inventory, Assessment and Monitoring (15 cr) 

or 

ENS-4311 Forest protection (15 cr) 

or 

ENS-4203 Business Planning for Green Economies (15 cr)

or 

ENS-4313 GIS for forestry land management 

ENS-4314 Forest Management Planning2 (15 cr) 

or 

ENS-4318 Social issues in forest management (15 cr) 

 

Core for MSc 

ENS-4321 MSc Dissertation (60 cr) 

Year 1: 60 credits 

 

Semester 1 

Semester 2 

 

Block A  

Block B 

Block C 

Block D 

Core

 

 

ENS-4306 Silviculture (15 cr)

 

 

ENS-4315 Forestry Study Tour (15 cr) 

Compulsory  

ENS-4304 Forest History, Policy and Management (15 cr) 

 

 

 

 

Optional 

 

 

 

ENS-4310 Inventory, Assessment and Monitoring (15 cr) 

or 

ENS-4311 Forest protection (15 cr) 

or 

ENS-4203 Business Planning for Green Economies (15 cr) 

 

 Year 2: 60 credits  

 

Semester 1 

Semester 2 

 

Block A  

Block B 

Block C 

Block D 

Compulsory

ENS-4300 Urban Forestry (15 cr)

 

 

 

 

Optional

 

 

ENS-4307 Ecological Restoration (15 cr) 

or 

ENS-4308 Timber & Wood-Based Products (15 cr)

ENS-4310 Inventory, Assessment and Monitoring (15 cr) 

or 

ENS-4311 Forest protection (15 cr) 

or 

ENS-4203 Business Planning for Green Economies (15 cr) 

or 

ENS-4313 GIS for forestry land management (15 cr) 

ENS-4314 Forest Management Planning3 (15 cr) 

or 

ENS-4318 Social issues in forest management (15 cr)

 

 Year 3: 60 credits  

Semester 1 

Semester 2 

Core: ENS-4321 MSc Dissertation (60 cr) 

 

Semester 1 

Semester 2 

 

Block A  

Block B 

Block C 

Block D 

Core  

 

 

 

 

 

 

ENS-4319 Tropical study tour (15 cr) 

 

Compulsory

ENS-4302 Fundamentals of Soil and Water (15 cr) 

ENS-4306 Silviculture (15 cr)

ENS-4310 Inventory, Assessment and Monitoring (15 cr) 

 

Optional (Choose one from each block) 

 

ENS-4300 Urban Forestry (15 cr)  

ENS-4305 Agroforestry systems and Practices (15 cr) 

Or 

ENS-4307 Ecological Restoration (15 cr)  

ENS-4311 Forest protection (15 cr)  

Or 

ENS-4313 GIS for forestry land management (15 cr) 

Or 

ENS-4309 Natural Resource Management (15 cr) 

ENS-4317 Forest ecosystems (15 cr) 

Or 

ENS-4318 Social issues in forest management (15 cr) 

 

Core for MSc 

ENS-4321 MSc Dissertation (60 cr)  (this is completed over the summer). 

Year 1: 90 credits

 

Semester 1 

Semester 2 

 

Block A  

Block B 

Block C 

Block D 

Core  

 

 

 

 

 

ENS-4319 Tropical study tour (15 cr)

Compulsory

ENS-4302 Fundamentals of Soil and Water (15 cr) 

ENS-4306 Silviculture (15 cr) 

ENS-4310 Inventory, Assessment and Monitoring (15 cr)  

 

Optional 

(Choose two in total from this row) 

ENS-4300 Urban Forestry (15 cr)  

ENS-4305 Agroforestry systems and Practices (15 cr) 

Or 

ENS-4307 Ecological Restoration (15 cr) 

ENS-4311 Forest protection (15 cr)  

Or 

ENS-4313 GIS for forestry land management (15 cr) 

Or 

ENS-4309 Natural Resource Management (15 cr) 

ENS-4317 Forest ecosystems (15 cr) 

Or 

ENS-4318 Social issues in forest management (15 cr)

Year 2: 90 credits  

(modules taken in year 1 cannot be taken again in year 2) 

 

Semester 1 

Semester 2 

 

Block A  

Block B 

Block C 

Block D 

Optional (choose two in total from this row) 

 

ENS-4305 Agroforestry systems and Practices (15 cr) 

Or 

ENS-4307 Ecological Restoration (15 cr)  

ENS-4311 Forest protection (15 cr)  

Or 

ENS-4313 GIS for forestry land management (15 cr) 

Or 

ENS-4309 Natural Resource Management (15 cr) 

ENS-4317 Forest ecosystems (15 cr) 

Or 

ENS-4318 Social issues in forest management (15 cr) 

Core for MSc 

ENS-4321 MSc Dissertation (60 cr) 

Year 1: 60 credits

 

Semester 1 

Semester 2 

 

Block A  

Block B 

Block C 

Block D 

Core 

 

 

 

ENS-4319 Tropical study tour (15 cr) 

Compulsory

ENS-4302 Fundamentals of Soil and Water (15 cr) 

ENS-4306 Silviculture (15 cr) 

ENS-4310 Inventory, Assessment and Monitoring (15 cr)  

 

 Year 2: 60 credits

 

Semester 1 

Semester 2 

 

Block A  

Block B 

Block C 

Block D 

Optional 

(choose one from each block) 

ENS-4300 Urban Forestry (15 cr)  

ENS-4305 Agroforestry systems and Practices (15 cr) 

Or 

ENS-4307 Ecological Restoration (15 cr)  

ENS-4311 Forest protection (15 cr)  

Or 

ENS-4313 GIS for forestry land management (15cr) 

Or 

ENS-4309 Natural Resource Management (15 cr) 

ENS-4317 Forest ecosystems (15 cr) 

Or 

ENS-4318 Social issues in forest management (15 cr) 

 Year 3: 60 credits  

 

Semester 1 

Semester 2 

 

Block A  

Block B 

Block C 

Block D 

Core for MSc 

ENS-4321 MSc Dissertation (60 cr) 

The Dissertation

Undoubtedly one of the most challenging parts of any Masters programme, the ‘dissertation’ is also the most exciting and rewarding aspect for the vast majority of students. For this component of the MSc degree programme, students undertake a piece of work culminating in the production of a ‘project dissertation’. The results of this study must be judged to constitute a critical evaluation and analysis of knowledge or information obtained, or to be an original contribution to knowledge.

A student may choose an area of research which is of particular interest to them, with the approval of the project supervisor, and/or which is associated with their employer’s activities.

In common with all UK Master of Science degree programmes, the final dissertation submission is evaluated by two independent internal markers with relevant expertise, as well as an external examiner from another University. The fee for this examination is included in the tuition fee. However, travel and subsistence expenses incurred during the project, as well as the costs of printing and binding the thesis (not compulsory), are additional costs that must be borne by the student.

There are a variety of charitable and professional organisations that may be willing to support student dissertations. These depend very much on the topic, are generally country-specific, and it is the responsibility of the student to follow up such opportunities, with advice from staff where appropriate.

Trees in a forest at sunset

Studying with Us

Generally a 2(i) undergraduate Honours degree in a relevant science or technology subject is required, such as biology, horticulture, agriculture, law, economics, engineering, geography, environmental science.

Applications from mature students who do not have higher education qualifications but have relevant work experience and who have worked for a minimum of 2 years in a position of responsibility and relevance to the degree will also be considered. 

We judge each and every application on its individual merits and if we have any concerns or questions regarding your suitability for the programme, you may be invited to interview (usually via MS Teams) before an offer decision is made.

The programmes commence in September each year.  We recommend you submit an application as soon as you can and no later than 31st July of the same year that you wish to enter the programme. If you apply after this deadline, we cannot guarantee you will be registered in time for the course start date. It can take several weeks from your application submission to receipt of a formal offer.

Before you apply, it is very important for you to understand that this is an academic, postgraduate level programme of study; expectations and standards of the programme reflect this. Students are expected to demonstrate intellectual understanding and critical, original interpretation, extensive engagement with, and synthesis of, relevant literature, data and other resources, and the ability to write and communicate to a high academic standard. 

We estimate that approximately 10 hours of student effort are required per module credit, thus a 15-credit module will require around 150 hours.  Exactly how much time is required is very much a ‘how long is a piece of string’ type question.  For part time students, we recommend committing yourself to at least 20-25 hours a week of focused study time.  There are support systems in place at Bangor University to help students, for example with their academic research and writing skills (such as through our Study Skills Centre). Engagement with such services is strongly encouraged as and when it is required: distance learning students are expected to be able to identify when they need assistance and make full use of the wide range of support available. 

As with all aspects of life, the more you put in, the more you get out and you should ask yourself the following questions before applying for this programme: 

  • How much study time is realistic for me, given my current commitments?  If necessary, what will I give up? 

  • Is there somewhere I can study and concentrate, with peace and quiet? 

  • Can I ensure I will have sufficiently reliable internet connectivity? 

  • What days of the week / times of the day will I study? 

  • How much of a perfectionist am I?  Studying part-time whilst having other responsibilities (e.g. full-time work / family / other interests) means that applicants must be realistic about what they can expect of themselves. 

Regular and effective use of Blackboard – a widely used virtual learning environment (VLE) – is fundamental to the forestry related degree programmes.  Developments in learning technologies mean that distance learning students can study modules alongside on-campus students and we make extensive use of MS Teams to enable this. This can help improve the learning experience because distance learning students from across the world can view and participate in live lectures and seminars delivered in Bangor (as well as view them afterwards); contribute to student-led seminars; ask questions and receive immediate feedback. At the same time, part-time students can study at a realistic pace and benefit from a wealth of resources, including module handbooks, study guides, e-books, discussion forums, self-assessment tools, as well as view and listen to any ‘live’ events that they have missed. 

**We do not provide hard-copies of materials, everything is available electronically** 

Most modules are divided into units, helping students break down large topics into more manageable components. A module handbook sets out week-by-week learning activities and other key information about assessments and examinations to help you plan your work. Some modules feature on-line self-assessments which you can use to gauge your progress whilst others feature facilitated discussion forums based on module topics. 

Your academic performance is assessed using a wide variety of approaches, including open-book exams, reports, essays, presentations, management plans, mapping exercises, critical reviews and group activities. By exploring the hyperlinks for the modules listed above you can find out how each module is assessed. 

Some modules include exams.  These are all ‘open book’ and take place during a 24-hour window, to allow for different time zones, to allow you to fulfil all your other commitments during a normal day (such as full-time employment, childcare, exercise, etc).  These are all conducted online via the Blackboard virtual learning environment and submissions are subject to plagiarism detection software that ensures each and every submission is unique. Details of the dates, timings and details of examinations are made available well in advance to students, once registered. There is no requirement for any student to travel to an examination centre to complete their exams on these programmes. 

At Bangor University, we pride ourselves not only on our teaching and research excellence but also for our friendly and approachable manner. We therefore actively encourage students to contact staff directly when they need to. 

The staff organising the forestry-related MSc degree programmes believe that an important part of our programmes is the provision of support for students. Various activities are organised within modules in order to monitor student progress, identify problems and provide guidance where needed, such as ‘drop-in’ sessions, seminars, discussion forums and more.  Assessments are set at intervals during each module. Such assessments may or may not form part of the summative assessment for the overall degree, but regardless, the idea is to encourage regular engagement, participation and structure to the learning experience. This approach enables us to identify early indicators of a potential problem, which can then be addressed before it is too late. 

People studying via distance learning are not required or expected to join any timetabled events ‘live’ but can do so if their circumstances allow / if they would like to.  Typically around 1/3 to ½ of distance learning students join events ‘live’, at least 1/3 never do.  We have done some analysis and found no evidence that ‘live’ attendance has any influence on ‘outcomes’ (e.g. student grades etc). 

The only exceptions in terms of physical ‘attendance’ are study tour modules.  As well as onlinelearning, these modules all include a residential for which attendance is required.  

As well as the Study Skills Centre where you can get support with all aspects of your studies, Bangor University is recognised as a leading centre for students with learning differences such as dyslexia.  You can contact the Dyslexia Team prior to applying to Bangor University. In any case, the Dyslexia Team will be notified of any specific requirements you may have as a result of any relevant information you divulge on your application form. 

Beyond the regulations, codes of practice, guidelines and procedures that govern all activities at Bangor University, we have three fundamental policies for students on these programmes: 

1. Open door policy.  Staff directly involved with these programmes are friendly and approachable and are always pleased to hear from students: you should feel free to contact relevant staff member(s) if you have questions, queries or concerns. 

2. No news is good news policy.  We view students on these programmes as equals: mature, capable individuals who are capable of studying at their own pace, on their own terms, following the teaching and learning that we provide and asking for help as and when required.  If we don’t hear from you, we assume all is well: this is why we have an ‘open door’ policy, so you feel welcome to get in touch if and when you need to. 

3. No hard feelings policy.  If, for any reason, your studies are not going as well as you’d hoped or expected, please get in touch.  We are 100% aware of the myriad of challenges that part-time students face and we are here to help, hence our ‘open door’ policy. 

Various organisations exist to support both part-time and full-time forestry students alike. Becoming a forestry student at Bangor will present you with a whole range of new opportunities, from additional scholarships and bursaries, UK and overseas study tours / conferences / seminars, student membership rates for a range of organisations, information about forestry and related job opportunities, and many other benefits. Details of some of the opportunities that recent students have taken advantage of can be found here

Additional scholarships and bursaries are usually for students already enrolled and very rarely cover tuition fees. It is up to individual students to apply for these opportunities. Please note: Bangor University can help bring these to the attention of students, but it will not apply for them on their behalf. 

Institute of Chartered Foresters logo
Credit:Institute of Chartered Foresters

Professional Accreditation

All four of our forestry MSc programmes are accredited by the Institute of Chartered Foresters (ICF) and worth 5 or 6 points, important if your ambition is to become a Chartered Forester.  All our students are strongly encouraged to join as student members (there is a significant reduction for registered students). For further information about ICF membership and working towards Chartered Forester status, please visit the relevant page on the ICF website. Please note that in order to meet the requirements of the forestry profession and of academic audits, and to ensure that the programme remains effective and up-to-date, our programmes are subject to constant refinement. Strict adherence to the listed module contents cannot therefore be guaranteed. 

Career Opportunities

Employability and changing career 

Our distance learning programmes have helped many people fulfil their ambitions. Around 60% of the students are already in the forestry or closely related professions and use our programmes to develop their career further, whilst the remainder use it to change career and/or simply find out more about the fascinating subject of forestry. Approximately 50% of the students who study with us with a view to changing to a forestry career succeed in doing so. Thanks to the part-time nature of the programme, some achieve this well before they have graduated. 

There are an enormous range of opportunities to enhance your employability during your studies.  Some examples of what distance learning students get up to during their studies with us can be found here on our Publication and News webpage. 

Profiles of some of our graduates can be found here

We see every student on our programmes as an individual and each makes their own path. Destiny and luck may play a small role, but a commitment to high quality study combined with characteristics such as being willing to take the initiative, having the ability to adapt and make use of professional networks, being prepared to relocate and being open-minded about opportunities as they arise, all greatly increase the chances of switching career. As to whether it’s well paid or not, it’s fair to say that forestry is not investment banking – but according to many working in the profession, any shortfall is more than made up for by the quality of life and the huge satisfaction that such a career brings. 

  • Marcus registered as a ‘career changer’ from the IT profession.  He made a few calls to relevant organisations shortly after he registered with us and got some forest inventory work (voluntary) with a local forestry company (unpaid). This led to work as a forest surveyor working on the National Forest Inventory (NFI) (paid) through a sub-contractor.  Subsequently, this led on to an assistant forest manager position with a private forestry company just two years after registering with us. 
  • Nick registered as a ‘career changer’ from the Building Services profession.  Within a few months he had a voluntary position with a wildlife trust working on a range of woodland management projects, then secured two days a week (paid) working as an assistant with a private forest management company.  He then secured a paid position with the same wildlife trust.  This led on to another role, and he was employed before the end of his programme as a Countryside Ranger by the National Trust and after graduation he moved a more senior role with the same organisation. 
  • Joanna registered as a ‘career changer’ from the charity / development sector.  She had already been doing various voluntary work relating to forestry. Within six months she had secured a job as a contractor on the NFI, and then got a job with a forest certification organisation. She successfully secured external funding to enable her to travel to Uganda to conduct her dissertation field work for which she won the ‘best poster’ prize at the World Agroforestry Congress. 
  • David registered as an assistant forest surveyor.  He worked with a leading forest nursery on his dissertation, setting up and managing a complex trial with over 7,000 seedlings.  His dissertation also included a financial evaluation.  He secured a position as a forestry investment specialist with a leading forestry business before he graduated.   
  • Kwadwo (from West Africa) registered as a CSC scholar. He has recently secured his first academic position as a lecturer in one of the top 100 universities in Africa. 
  • Daniel (from Central Africa) registered as a CSC scholar. He secured various research assistant roles during his registration, partly through links made through Bangor University. He commenced a PhD shortly after his graduation. 
  • Jim (from England) registered whilst working in hospitality, with no previous experience of forestry.  During his first year on the programme, he successfully applied for a 12 month student placement with Pryor and Rickett Silviculture, which has since developed into a permanent Forest Manager position. 
A beam of sunlight penetrates oaks standing on a hillside.
Oaks standing on a hillside.
Credit:Dan Struther

School of Environmental and Natural Sciences, Bangor University, Bangor LL57 2DG

Contact us

You can catch up with us on Facebook or get in touch by phone or email.

School of Environmental and Natural Sciences, Bangor University, Bangor LL57 2DG

It looks like you’re visiting from outside the UK, would you like to be redirected to the international page?