Latest News

Opening of new Bangor University biotechnology research centre

A research centre that will discover new enzymes with the potential to transform the efficiency of biotechnology industries has just been opened in the presence of research scientists from across Europe, industry representatives and officials from the Welsh Government.

Publication date: 16 October 2018

Prestigious International Fellowship for promising young researcher

A post-doctoral researcher at Bangor University’s School of Natural Sciences, has been awarded a prestigious  European Commission Horizon2020 funded Marie Sklodowska Curie Global Fellowship.

The fellowship, which allows for international mobility and knowledge exchange will enable Dr Karina Marsden of Bethesda to spend two years working in The University of Melbourne, Australia, before returning to Bangor University for the final year of her research project.  It was awarded following a successful joint application by Bangor and Melbourne universities.

Publication date: 15 October 2018

Are electric fences really the best way to solve human-elephant land conflicts?

Conflict between humans and elephants has reached a crisis point in Kenya. As the elephants have begun to regularly raid farms in search of food, it has become not uncommon for local people to attack and kill them in retaliation. Between 2013 and 2016, 1,700 crop raiding incidents, 40 human deaths and 300 injuries caused by wildlife were reported in the Kajiado district alone.

This article by Liudmila Osipova, PhD Researcher, Bangor University is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 12 October 2018

Bangor University student reaches semi-finals of national business competition

forestry student from Bangor University has reached the semi-finals of a national business competition run by a charity that supports student and graduate entrepreneurs. Jemima Letts, 21, has been shortlisted in the Tata Social Impact category for her business Tree Sparks, a social enterprise aiming to ignite conversation within 15-19 year olds about environmental awareness, as well as highlight that jobs within the environmental sector are viable for young people.

Publication date: 11 October 2018

High-res data offer most detailed look yet at trawl fishing footprint around the world

About a quarter of the world's seafood caught in the ocean comes from bottom trawling, a method that involves towing a net along the seabed on continental shelves and slopes to catch shrimp, cod, rockfish, sole and other kinds of bottom-dwelling fish and shellfish. The technique impacts these seafloor ecosystems, because other marine life and habitats can be unintentionally killed or disturbed as nets pass across the seafloor.

A new analysis that uses high-resolution data for 24 ocean regions in Africa, Europe, North and South America and Australasia shows that only 14 percent of the overall seafloor shallower than 1,000 meters (3,280 feet) is trawled. Most trawl fishing happens in this depth range along continental shelves and slopes in the world's oceans. The study focused on this depth range, covering an area of about 7.8 million square kilometers of ocean.

Publication date: 9 October 2018

Tanzania to adopt new policies to safeguard fish stocks

The Tanzanian Ministry of Livestock and Fisheries is to adopt recommendations for conserving the unique genetic diversity of tilapia for food security.

The recommendations are based on the findings of research led by Prof George Turner at Bangor University's School of Natural Sciences, in collaboration with colleagues at Bristol University, the Earlham Institute at Norwich and at the Tanzania Fisheries Research Institute (Tafiri), funded by the Royal Society, the Leverhulme Trust, the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) and the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC).

Publication date: 8 October 2018

Tree Sparks goes from strength to strength

An eco-awareness company set-up by a Forestry student following a period of ill-health has been given a seal of approval from an influential business network in the region.

Publication date: 4 October 2018

The young Bangor fish entrepreneur who believes that any fin is possible

A 20 year old student at Bangor University is using his lifelong passion for marine biology to drive his ambitions to become the largest online livestock supplier of fish species in the UK. Sam Hamill, who is currently in his third year studying Marine Biology, is set to launch Big on Fish in November, an online shop and retail store selling aquarium equipment and stocking over 1,100 exotic fish and coral species.

Publication date: 27 September 2018

Bangor Chemistry @ EUChemS 2018

Working under the guidance of Dr Leigh Jones, chemistry PhD students Mari Slater-Parry and Baba Fugu Mohammed, recently attended the 7th EuChemS chemistry congress at the ACC in Liverpool (26th-30thAugust, 2018). 

Publication date: 18 September 2018

Historic wrecks to assist Wales’ marine renewable energy future

Historic wrecks around Wales’ coastline, such as that of a German submarine sunk 10 miles off Bardsey Island at the tip of the Llŷn Peninsula on Christmas Day 1917, are to play a part in assisting Wales’ growing marine renewable energy sector.

Over the next two years, marine scientists from Bangor University will be surveying the coast of Wales as part of the ERDF-funded SEACAMS2 project led by the University in partnership with Swansea University. The researchers at Bangor University’s School of Ocean Sciences and Centre for Applied Marine Sciences are undertaking collaborative research, including marine surveys, to support the sustainable growth of the marine renewable energy sector in Wales. 

Publication date: 8 September 2018

Surveying the Salamander’s Habitat in Honduras

A Bangor University student has just returned home from a six-week expedition to Honduras in Central America. Molly Mannion, 20, from Bangor has just completed the second year of her four-year MZool Zoology with Herpetology degree. 

Publication date: 30 August 2018

Extreme weather in Europe linked to less sea ice and warming in the Barents Sea

This article by Yueng-Djern Lenn, Senior Lecturer in Physical Oceanography, Benjamin Barton, PhD Researcher, School of Ocean Sciences and Camille Lique, Research scientist in physical oceanography, Institut Français de Recherche pour l’Exploitation de la Mer (Ifremer) was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 30 August 2018

Research methods that find serial criminals could help save tigers

A geographic profiling tool used to catch serial criminals could help reduce the casualties of human-tiger conflict, according to scientists who collaborated on an innovative conservation research study.

Publication date: 28 August 2018

Call of the Sea(World)

A Bangor University student from Tenerife is on course to achieve his lifelong dream of pursuing a career in the marine environment. 

Publication date: 20 July 2018

Mixing Marine Science with Music

Having harboured a passion for both music and marine science, a Bangor University student has graduated with pride, scooping up prizes and accolades along the way. Samuel Hartharn-Evans, 21, from Bebington, Wirral has not only graduated with a first-class BSc Marine Biology & Oceanography degree, but has also won the Dr John Robert Jones Prize of £600, which is awarded annually to the best students across all disciplines at the University.  

Publication date: 20 July 2018

Double whammy for Shammi!

An engineering student’s dream comes true this week as she graduates from Bangor University.

Publication date: 16 July 2018

Forestry Student Launches Social Enterprise

A student from Bangor University forced to turn-down her dream work placement because of ongoing health problems has reason to celebrate following the launch of her own eco-awareness business, which aims to enlighten teenagers about environmental issues.

Publication date: 4 June 2018