News: May 2018

New PhD opportunity available to UK/EU Nationals in the MEFGL, Bangor: Defining Management Units in Commercial Fish Species

Find more information here.

Publication date: 30 May 2018

Cultivating Chinese orchids could conserve wild species

Asking people who want to buy orchids about their preferences when choosing which plants to buy has revealed that many unknowingly buy wild, possibly endangered orchids, when they would be just as happy to buy commercially grown plants that meet their preferences for colour and price.

Publication date: 25 May 2018

Tidal range power plants hold potential for electricity generation

In theory, one third of global electricity needs could be provided by the world’s tidal range, according to a new comprehensive state-of-the-art review of tidal range power plants.

Publication date: 21 May 2018

Sacred sites have a biodiversity advantage that could help world conservation

Since the dawn of history, human societies have ascribed sacred status to certain places. Areas such as ancestral burial grounds, temples and churchyards have been given protection through taboo and religious belief. As many of these places have been carefully managed for many years an interesting side effect has occurred – the sites often retain more of their natural condition than surrounding areas used for farming or human habitation. As a result, they are often called “sacred natural sites” (SNS).

This article by John Healey, Professor of Forest Sciences, Bangor UniversityJohn Halley, Professor of Ecology, University of Ioannina, and Kalliopi Stara, Postdoctoral Researcher, University of Ioannina was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 17 May 2018

Some lizards have green blood that should kill them – and scientists can't work out why

If you were to see certain New Guinea skinks lose their tails, you’d notice that their blood isn’t the usual red colour we’re used to but rather a virulent shade of green. What’s even more bizarre is that the substance that’s responsible for the green colour of the lizards’ blood (and bones, tongues, muscles and mucous membranes) would be toxic in other animals if they carried it in such large amounts.

Exactly why these skinks are filled with this toxic substance and why it doesn’t kill them is something of a mystery. But new research published in Science Advancesmakes an important step towards answering these questions.

This article by Dr Anita Malhotra, Senior Lecturer in Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, School of Biological SciencesBangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article

Publication date: 17 May 2018

New insight into motivation of farmers to plant trees

The research of former Bangor University PhD student Syed Rahman features in a new high-profile blog published by the prestigious Centre for International Forestry Research (CIFOR). 

Publication date: 14 May 2018

Will's animation wins NERC Envision DTP competition

Publication date: 14 May 2018

Dr Cledwyn Hughes

The School was very saddened to learn of the death of Dr Cledwyn Hughes on the 29th April 2018. A native of Anglesey, ‘Cled’ as he was known by to staff and students, read for a BSc (Hons) Geography and Geology degree at University College Wales, Aberystwyth. 

Publication date: 2 May 2018