News: July 2018

Call of the Sea(World)

A Bangor University student from Tenerife is on course to achieve his lifelong dream of pursuing a career in the marine environment. 

Publication date: 20 July 2018

Mixing Marine Science with Music

Having harboured a passion for both music and marine science, a Bangor University student has graduated with pride, scooping up prizes and accolades along the way. Samuel Hartharn-Evans, 21, from Bebington, Wirral has not only graduated with a first-class BSc Marine Biology & Oceanography degree, but has also won the Dr John Robert Jones Prize of £600, which is awarded annually to the best students across all disciplines at the University.  

Publication date: 20 July 2018

Bangor University students awarded prestigious Drapers’ Company medals

Two Bangor University students have been presented with Drapers’ Medals. The Drapers’ Company is one of the historic Livery Companies of the City of London, and now a philanthropic organization. The Drapers’ Company kindly donates two medals each year to be awarded to outstanding postgraduate students. These prestigious awards takes into account the quality of a student’s research, teaching, and service to the University and community.

Publication date: 18 July 2018

Ryan celebrates the nature of his achievement in obtaining dream job

Inspired by broadcaster and naturist, Sir David Attenborough, a Bangor University student hopes to follow in his footsteps by bringing important conservation issues to the attention of future generations.

Publication date: 18 July 2018

Lifelong contribution to fish and fisheries science rewarded

Gary Carvalho, Professor in Zoology at Bangor University has been awarded the Fisheries Society of the British Isles (FSBI) Beverton Medal for his ground-breaking research and lifelong contribution to fish and fisheries science.

The Beverton Medal the FSBI’s most senior award and highest honour and marks Prof Carvalho as a distinguished scientist. He received the Medal and gave an acceptance speech at the recent FSBI Symposium.

Publication date: 17 July 2018

Double whammy for Shammi!

An engineering student’s dream comes true this week as she graduates from Bangor University.

Publication date: 16 July 2018

Pristine Antarctic fjords contain similar levels of microplastics to open oceans near big civilisations

In the middle of the last century, mass-produced, disposable plastic waste started washing up on shorelines, and to be found in the middle of the oceans. This has since become an increasingly serious problem, spreading globally to even the most remote places on Earth. Just a few decades later, in the 1970s, scientists found the same problem was occurring at a much less visible, microscopic level, with microplastics.

This article by Alexis Janosik, Assistant Professor of Biology, University of West FloridaDavid Barnes, Data Interpretation Ecologist, British Antarctic SurveyJames Scourse, Professor of Physical Geography, University of Exeter, and Katrien Van Landeghem, Senior Lecturer in Marine Geology, Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 16 July 2018

Brain Cancer stem cells manipulated on a ‘lab on chip’ for first time

As the first stage has been achieved in a new European research collaboration to combat two of the most aggressive brain cancers (www.sumcastec.eu), academic and industry  participants are meeting at Bangor University this week (11-12 July) to discuss the next steps.

Publication date: 11 July 2018

Pupils get taste of Uni Life

Almost 50 pupils from schools and colleges throughout North Wales got to experience university life for themselves at Bangor University recently.

Publication date: 11 July 2018

Some of the world’s poorest people are bearing the costs of tropical forest conservation

Global conservation targets should not be met at the cost of the world’s poor. The first study to evaluate a policy aiming to compensate local people for the costs of conservation has revealed that, despite good intentions, the poor have lost out.

Tropical forests are important to all of us on the planet. As well as being home for rare and fascinating biodiversity (like the lemurs of Madagascar), tropical forests lock up enormous amounts of carbon helping to stabilise our climate. However tropical forests are also home to many hundreds of thousands of people whose lives can be affected by international conservation policies.

Multilateral donors such as the World Bank have made clear commitments that those negatively impacted by their projects should be compensated. This includes those affected by conservation projects such as those intended to slow climate change by preventing tropical deforestation (a scheme known as REDD+ or Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation). Researchers have, for the first time, studied one such compensation scheme in depth and revealed it to be inadequate.

Publication date: 5 July 2018

Researching changes to our Arctic Ocean

Bangor University’s School of Ocean Sciences is leading one of 12 major research projects to have successfully bid to carry out crucial research in one of the most inhospitable regions on the planet- the Arctic.

The joint-funding for the work comes to the University from the UK’s Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) and Germany’s Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) under the Changing Arctic Ocean project.

Dr Yueng-Djern Lenn, a Senior Lecturer in Physical Oceanography at the School of Ocean Sciences is to lead the new three-year research project with partners and collaborating institutions. The aim is to increase understanding of how changes within our oceans might affect the quantity of phytoplankton produced in the Arctic Ocean.

Publication date: 3 July 2018

UK and Germany combine forces to fund crucial Arctic science

Natural Environment Research Council- changing Artic Ocean Media release

For the first time, the UK and Germany have joined forces to investigate the impact of climate change on the Arctic Ocean.

The UK’s Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) and Germany’s Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) have jointly invested almost £8 million in 12 new projects to carry out crucial research in one of the most inhospitable regions on the planet. The new projects start today and join the existing NERC Changing Arctic Ocean research programme, which aims to better understand – and predict – changes to the Arctic marine environment and ecosystems.

Publication date: 3 July 2018