News Archive: October 2018

Another Award for Bangor University’s Student Accommodation

Bangor University’s student accommodation has been awarded ‘Best Student Halls’ by a major source of information for prospective students.

Student Crowd (https://www.studentcrowd.com/) provides a space where students can review their university resources, and where potential students can learn about the universities they’re interested in, from real student feedback.

Publication date: 15 October 2018

Prestigious International Fellowship for promising young researcher

A post-doctoral researcher at Bangor University’s School of Natural Sciences, has been awarded a prestigious  European Commission Horizon2020 funded Marie Sklodowska Curie Global Fellowship.

The fellowship, which allows for international mobility and knowledge exchange will enable Dr Karina Marsden of Bethesda to spend two years working in The University of Melbourne, Australia, before returning to Bangor University for the final year of her research project.  It was awarded following a successful joint application by Bangor and Melbourne universities.

Publication date: 15 October 2018

Welsh learners presented with their certificates on Shwmae Su’mae Day

A number of University staff who have been undertaking Welsh language courses have received certificates for their efforts today as part of Shwmae Su'mae Day, a day that promotes the use of Welsh by encouraging everyone to start chatting with simple greetings in the language.

Publication date: 15 October 2018

Are electric fences really the best way to solve human-elephant land conflicts?

Conflict between humans and elephants has reached a crisis point in Kenya. As the elephants have begun to regularly raid farms in search of food, it has become not uncommon for local people to attack and kill them in retaliation. Between 2013 and 2016, 1,700 crop raiding incidents, 40 human deaths and 300 injuries caused by wildlife were reported in the Kajiado district alone.

This article by Liudmila Osipova, PhD Researcher, Bangor University is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 12 October 2018

Waste Awareness Week #WAW18

Last week, Bangor University ran its second ever ‘Waste Awareness Week’ (WAW) between Saturday the 29th September and Friday the 5th October 2018. The campaign was launched to share ideas and raise awareness about the importance of resource efficiency both in the University and in Bangor City, to reduce our environmental impacts both locally and nationally and to encourage our students to become responsible global citizens.

The Sustainability Lab worked in partnership with Campus LifeHalls of ResidenceStudent HousingCatering, the International OfficeGwynedd Council, the Chartered Institution of Wastes Management (CIWM) and British Heart Foundation Cymru(BHF) to run an exciting range of WAW activities and events during the week. These included a beach clean, waste awareness visits in student halls and private accommodation, waste career talks, a campus cleaning event, an information sharing day, recycling quizzes, a debate night, a film night and an eco-craft night, along with other smaller idea-sharing events.  

Publication date: 12 October 2018

Bangor University research informs national policy and provides the evidence base for Wales’ first Rural Education Action Plan

Cabinet Secretary for Education Kirsty Williams has today (11/10/18) launched the Welsh Government’s new Rural Education Action Plan that introduces a range of initiatives and measures for educational improvements and experiences across rural school areas of Wales.

The action plan forms a pivotal part of the transformation reforms outlined in Education in Wales - Our national mission 2017-21 that sets out Welsh Government’s strategy on how they aim to improve the school system by 2021 and details activities which will transform policy into practices in our schools. The action plan draws upon evidence and recommendations made in a research report led by Gwilym Siôn ap Gruffudd of Bangor University’s School of Education and Human Development. The report: Rethinking Educational Attainment and Poverty- in Rural Wales (REAP) was commissioned by Regional Education Consortia ERW and GwE as a result of a competitive tender process.

Publication date: 11 October 2018

High-res data offer most detailed look yet at trawl fishing footprint around the world

About a quarter of the world's seafood caught in the ocean comes from bottom trawling, a method that involves towing a net along the seabed on continental shelves and slopes to catch shrimp, cod, rockfish, sole and other kinds of bottom-dwelling fish and shellfish. The technique impacts these seafloor ecosystems, because other marine life and habitats can be unintentionally killed or disturbed as nets pass across the seafloor.

A new analysis that uses high-resolution data for 24 ocean regions in Africa, Europe, North and South America and Australasia shows that only 14 percent of the overall seafloor shallower than 1,000 meters (3,280 feet) is trawled. Most trawl fishing happens in this depth range along continental shelves and slopes in the world's oceans. The study focused on this depth range, covering an area of about 7.8 million square kilometers of ocean.

Publication date: 9 October 2018

Tanzania to adopt new policies to safeguard fish stocks

The Tanzanian Ministry of Livestock and Fisheries is to adopt recommendations for conserving the unique genetic diversity of tilapia for food security.

The recommendations are based on the findings of research led by Prof George Turner at Bangor University's School of Natural Sciences, in collaboration with colleagues at Bristol University, the Earlham Institute at Norwich and at the Tanzania Fisheries Research Institute (Tafiri), funded by the Royal Society, the Leverhulme Trust, the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) and the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC).

Publication date: 8 October 2018

Four Bangor University students compose 100 poems in 24 hours

On this year’s National Poetry Day, four Bangor University students took up Literature Wales’ annual challenge to compose 100 original poems in 24 hours.

Publication date: 5 October 2018

Research by Canolfan Bedwyr’s Language Technologies Unit informs European agenda

Research and expertise by Canolfan Bedwyr's Language Technologies Unit were referenced the European Parliament recently, as Plaid Cymru's European MP, Jill Evans, credited the work of the Unit as being at the forefront of minority language technology. The MEP presented findings of the recommendations made by the Digital Language Diversity Project (DLDP) in its report on ensuring linguistic equality in the fields of digital technology. Following the speech by Jill Evans MEP, the head of the Language Technologies Unit, Delyth Prys, and the Unit's Chief Software Engineer, Dewi Bryn Jones, were invited to speak at a conference on language technologies and digital equality within a multilingual Europe.

Publication date: 4 October 2018

Tree Sparks goes from strength to strength

An eco-awareness company set-up by a Forestry student following a period of ill-health has been given a seal of approval from an influential business network in the region.

Publication date: 4 October 2018

Universities must look at local employment markets when building their graduates' skills

Students are often reminded that a degree is “not enough”, and that they will also need “employability skills” – a complex combination of personal attributes, discipline-specific knowledge and generic talents – to succeed after university. They are encouraged while studying to develop skills such as problem solving, self-management and the ability to work as part of a team.

This article by Teresa Crew, Lecturer in Social Policy, School of History, Philosophy & Social Sciences is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 4 October 2018

Why we should give prejudiced students a voice in the classroom

In the space of a few years, Britain’s political landscape has changed. Now, generally, young people are proportionately more likely to have socially liberal and socialist views, and want to remain part of the EU. Meanwhile, older demographics proportionately voted for Brexit, and were said to be largely responsible for voting the Conservatives into office in 2017.

This article by Corinna Patterson, Lecturer in Sociology, at the School of History, Philosophy and Social Science is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 3 October 2018

Fulbright enables Triple Harp research

An American student has just embarked on a postgraduate research degree at Bangor University having received a highly prestigious Fulbright Award.

Publication date: 2 October 2018

Tours of Bangor University’s art and ceramic collections accompanied by poetry

Guided tours of Bangor University’s Art and Ceramic Collections will be held in conjunction with English Literature at Bangor University this October and November. The aim is to raise awareness of these important collections, with highlights including a mural by Edward Povey in Powis Hall, art and ceramics in the University’s Council Chamber Corridor and a chance to see and learn about works of arts by other renowned artists such as Kyffin Williams, Brenda Chamberlain, Peter Prendergast and Frederick William Hayes.

Publication date: 2 October 2018