Latest Research News

Wales's tourism problem is down to a disconnect with its own people

Wales is a country bursting with ancient culture and beautiful landscapes. It is home to a vibrant people, who are intensely proud of their heritage. It sounds like the perfect place for many a traveller to visit – so why then, has it long struggled to attract foreign tourism?

This article by Euryn Rhys Roberts, Lecturer in Medieval and Welsh History, was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 14 August 2018

Bangor University secures further EU funding for new research hub

Bangor University will benefit from a further £2.8m of EU funding for a new science and innovation hub to boost Wales’ shellfish industry, Finance Secretary Mark Drakeford announced today [Monday 13 August].

Publication date: 13 August 2018

Inspiring Research

Several of the poems in Siôn Aled’s new collection, Meirioli, were inspired by his experiences while conducting research with the School of Education at Bangor University into the factors influencing school pupils’ social use of Welsh.

Publication date: 3 August 2018

Widespread giant African cobra revealed to be five distinct species

Cobras are among the most widely known venomous snakes, and yet a new research paper (ZOOTAXA 1 August 2018   http://dx.doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4455.1.3) has revealed that what was thought to be a single widespread cobra species, the forest cobra, is, in fact, made up of five separate species. Two of these species, the Black Forest Cobra and the West African Banded Cobra, are new to science and are first named in this paper.

Publication date: 2 August 2018

Economy Secretary visits BioComposites Centre

The Welsh Government’s Economy and Transport Secretary, Ken Skates visited Bangor University’s BioComposites Centre recently to see examples of the centre’s collaborative research.

Publication date: 1 August 2018

Older people helping to grow the Welsh economy

With more people living and working in Wales past the age of 65 years, the contribution that they make to the Welsh economy is growing.

So say health economists from the Centre for Health Economics and Medicines Evaluation (CHEME) at Bangor University in their report Living well for longer: The economic argument for investing in the health and wellbeing of older people in Wales launched today (30 July 2018).

Publication date: 30 July 2018

New perspectives on Wales at North American Association for the Study of Welsh Culture and History Conference

International academics and students of Welsh history converge on Bangor University this week (25th to the 27th of July), as the University hosts the 12th biennial North American Association for the Study of Welsh Culture and History (NAASWCH) Conference of 2018

Publication date: 24 July 2018

Response to the Reid report on research and innovation

Following today’s publication of Professor Graeme Reid’s review of Government-funded research and innovation in Wales, Bangor University’s Pro Vice-Chancellor for Research & Impact, Professor Jo Rycroft-Malone said: “Wales has a number of strengths in research and innovation and it’s important that we continue to support existing areas of excellence, as well as develop and nurture new areas of expertise.

Publication date: 6 June 2018

Five brain-boosting reasons to take up martial arts – at any age

This article by Ashleigh Johnstone, PhD researcher in Cognitive Neuroscience at the School of Psychology was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

We are all aware that exercise generally has many benefits, such as improving physical fitness and strength. But what do we know about the effects of specific types of exercise? Researchers have already shown that jogging can increase life expectancy, for example, while yoga makes us happy. However, there is one activity that goes beyond enhancing physical and mental health – martial arts can boost your brain’s cognition too.

Publication date: 8 May 2018