Underwater image of fish at a reef.

Marine Biology

In the top 10% of the most sustainable universities worldwide (QS World Rankings: Sustainability 2024).

 

 

Explore our Undergraduate Courses

Dan Lambley, a Bangor graduate, at work during an oil spill response exercise

Graduate Profile Dan Lambley

"As an Oil Spill Responder, I travel anywhere in the world at short notice to provide technical advice and active response assistance to minimise the environmental impact of an oil spill."

Why Study Marine Biology?

The increasing global population coupled with challenges posed by climate change place increasing pressure on the Earth resources. Marine Biologists have a key role to play in the development of sustainable future food resources against a backdrop of climate change and increasing levels of waste.

Wild-capture fisheries and aquaculture together produce ~200 million tonnes of food per year with a great potential for expansion. As a Marine Biologist you will gain the knowledge and skills to manage these important resources and to ensure that they are managed in a sustainable way so that the natural environment is conserved.

By studying Marine Biology, you will gain the critical appraisal skills to identify and define problems, and the analytical skills to be able to find solutions

  • We are one of the largest university centres teaching Marine Sciences in Britain.
  • We have a £3.5m ocean-going research ship and three smaller inshore vessels.
  • Our excellent facilities include tropical marine and temperate marine aquaria, analytical laboratories, flow and particle transport simulators and computing capabilities.

We have unrivalled access to the sea and sea shore, ideal for undertaking experimental work in the intertidal environment. 

I don't have many regrets, but not studying at Bangor is one of them.

Steve Backshall,  Honorary lecturer and part of Bangor University's teaching team; naturalist, explorer and presenter

[0:04]
And I'm incredibly lucky that very early in life I realised that I had this one thing that could always make me feel better.

[0:08]
Didn't matter how low I was plunging, that I had somewhere that I could take myself, where I could reset,

[0:16]
where I could remind myself of where I come from and what is special to me and the things I'm passionate about.

[0:22]
And it doesn't matter if it's up in the mountain or in a in a lake or in the sea.

[0:28]
Those are the things that just reset me.

[0:32]
And so I would say that, you know, you see yourself getting getting down, take advantage of all of the absolute wonders that we have here.

[0:40]
The people, you know, in the nation will travel hundreds of miles to come and see.

[0:45]
You have them right on your doorstep. You might only be here for three years or four years.

[0:49]
Take take advantage of them because it is so, so special.

[0:55]
And, you know, there is nothing that can compare to being up on the Glyderau or the, you know, the Carneddau as the sun is just starting to rise.

[1:04]
Standing on top of Tryfan and looking at all those mountains and just knowing that this right now is

[1:10]
your home and your place - embrace it. You've all made the best decision of your lives in coming here.

[1:15]
And I just want you all to make the most of it, treasure it, use it as best as you possibly can, you know, on your doorstep.

[1:22]
You have natural wonders that almost nobody else at university in this nation has.

[1:26]
So please, please use them to their full extent. And I promise I'll be back and see you sometime soon while you're here.
 

[0:03] So, so excited! It's so great to meet Steve! It's just such a great opportunity, to even see the

[0:09] Menai Strait in a different way as well.

[0:12] One of the reasons why I chose Bangor initially, was to be in such an area as this

[0:16] There's no better way to spend the afternoon really!

[0:23] We're heading out into the Menai Strait and off to Puffin Island with a group of students of the natural sciences.

[0:28] To get a flavour of the very finest of this area has to offer.

[0:47] Well, so far we've seen kind of all the very best of the wildlife from this part of the world, particularly when it comes to the birds.

[0:53] The ledges are thick, almost every single centimetre is covered with guillemots, a gull...

[0:59] and we've seen gannets and of course puffins as well.

[01:02] I guess this is why I decided to build a relationship with Bangor.

[01:06] What you can see right here. You know, any institution can invest in its infrastructure.

[01:11] Any institution can get bigger buildings or get more teaching.

[01:14] But there's no amount of investing that can get this.

[01:18] Having this on your doorstep is why Bangor is the best place to study natural sciences in the nation.

[01:30] It is fantastic. You know, obviously not just the company with having Steve there, it's seeing the wildlife that we saw the kittiwakes

[01:37] there cormorants the seals and that sort of stuff. Absolutely phenomenal, like once in a lifetime.

[01:41] Steve is such a genuine lovely guy. Yes, absolutely amazing. There's no better place to be.

[01:46] It's been a pretty amazing afternoon. I feel a little bit buffeted and and chilled.

[01:51] But to be able to head out from you know, you can see the University from here.

[01:56] You can see the halls of residence from here. To be a student here and think that you could finish studying,

[02:01] come down and get on a paddleboard or a kayak and head out into the Menai Strait and have this is your way of relieving exam stress.

[02:08] I mean, that just absolutely blows my mind.

Sir David Attenborough

Honorary Graduate Sir David Attenborough

“Bangor University has a superb reputation in the study of environmental science. The world needs people skilled in the expertise needed to play a crucial part in solving the world’s problems.” 

Watch - Study Marine Sciences

Lauren talks about studying ocean sciences in one of the largest university Marine Science departments in Europe. Located on the shores of the Menai Strait, the School is the ideal place to study marine and ocean sciences and even has its own research ship, the Prince Madog.

Image of Jessica Fox

Student Profile Jessica Fox

MSci Marine Biology and Oceanography

"From almost the first moment we walked through the Main Arts doors in the morning we knew that this was going to be the place for me. As the day went on it just got better and better – particularly when we got to visit the School of Ocean Sciences."

Do you have a question about life as a Bangor University student? Our ambassadors will be happy to help you find the answer.

They can tell you more about studying here, about the amazing Clubs and Societies we have, and how they made friends and settled in to life at university as a Marine Biology student. 

If you have any questions about the course, our lecturers are on hand to help. Below are some examples of frequently asked questions. Can you think of any more? 

  • What are the qualities of a successful Marine Biology student at Bangor?
  • How can I prepare myself to study Marine Biology at Bangor?
  • How will I know that Marine Biology at Bangor is the right choice for me?

Our Research in Marine Biology

Bangor University has a long track record of Marine Biology research stretching back over 100 years. Our research covers the full marine realm, ranging from semi-terrestrial habitats such as saltmarshes to the deep sea and from the poles to the tropics. We currently have research projects which focus on Antarctic fjords and Indian Ocean Coral reefs.

An important strand of Marine Biology research here at Bangor focuses on conservation and marine resource management. Our research examines how anthropogenic disturbances such as exploitation, invasive species and climate change affect marine ecosystems, and how to best manage and protect these ecosystems

Our research underpins the sustainable exploitation and production of wild-capture fish and aquaculture. It also covers the wider impacts of fisheries and aquaculture on the marine ecosystem and how they can affect bycatch species (other fish, seabirds, marine mammals, seabed organisms) and habitats (e.g. reefs, seagrass beds). It also underpins our development of sustainable tropical fish hatcheries.

Related Subject Areas

You may also be interested in these related subject areas.

Related Subject Areas

You may also be interested in these related subject areas.

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