Latest News

Talking About Climate Change - Primates Vs Humans

A group of Zoology students at Bangor University have recently returned from a field trip to Uganda where they have been researching the effects of climate change on primates. 

Publication date: 15 November 2019

Packaging our foods without plastic

People worldwide are increasingly concerned by the amount of single use plastic which surrounds our purchases, and in particular our food shopping.

While such wrappings appear unnecessary, many fruit and vegetable producers would argue that packaging perishables ensures that consumers can easily carry away their food. Further, more food reaches the market place undamaged, increasing the food supply and reducing food waste.

The solution lies in developing sustainable food packaging alternatives.

Publication date: 13 November 2019

Where can a BSc Forestry degree from Bangor University take you?

Bangor University has been teaching forestry for 115 years and over this period has built up extensive links across academia and industry, both nationally and globally. 

Publication date: 6 November 2019

The most decorated BSc Forestry graduates for a generation?

This July saw witnessed some of the best degree results for a generation from the BSc Forestry degrees at Bangor University. We celebrate the achievements of all our students, regardless of their degree class, here we highlight two graduates who deserved special mention.

Publication date: 31 October 2019

Botswana is humanity's ancestral home, claims major study – well, actually …

A study claims the first humans lived in a wetland around what is now northern Botswana. 

A recent paper in the prestigious journal Nature claims to show that modern humans originated about 200,000 years ago in the region around northern Botswana. For a scientist like myself who studies human origins, this is exciting news. If correct, this paper would suggest that we finally know where our species comes from.

But there are actually several reasons why I and some of my colleagues are not entirely convinced. In fact, there’s good reason to believe that our species doesn’t even have a single origin.

This article by Isabelle Catherine Winder, Lecturer in Zoology, is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 31 October 2019

Time Travel, History and Fun – It’s all here at the Brambell Natural History Museum

If you’re looking for a spot of time travel and historical adventure, Brambell Natural History Museum, Bangor University has it covered this October Half Term as part of Welsh Museums Festival (26 October to 3 November).

Brambell Natural History Museum, Bangor University will be open on Saturday, 2nd November 11-1 as part of the Festival.  

Publication date: 24 October 2019

Scientist and lecturer to exhibit in major national Wildlife art exhibition

An honorary lecturer at Bangor University balances her scientific interest in birds by expressing her fascination with them through her art. 

Rachel Taylor’s work has now been selected from over 600 submissions to appear alongside works by some of Britain’s leading wildlife artists. The exhibition will be on display at Mall Galleries between 24 October to 3 November 2019.

Publication date: 22 October 2019