Latest News

Mangrove forests can rebound thanks to climate change – it’s an opportunity we must take

Humans have become adept at destroying natural habitats. Indeed, we’re so good at it we’ve changed the very makeup and climate of our planet. But there may be signs the natural world is fighting back by protecting itself against rising temperatures and changing weather patterns, and we face the tantalising prospect of helping this process.

This article by Christian Dunn, Senior Lecturer in Zoology at the School of Natural Sciences is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 20 November 2018

More experiments may help explore what works in conservation

All over the world, countless conservation projects are taking place, attempting to achieve aims from reducing habitat loss, to restoring populations of threatened species. However there is growing awareness that conservationists have not always done a good enough job at evaluating whether the things they do really work. But our new study shows that simply experimenting could change this.

This article by Julia P G Jones, Professor of Conservation Science, School of Natural Sciences is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 5 November 2018

CodiSTEM (25/10/18)

Over 600 school pupils from North Wales attended the Codi STEM event held at Coleg Llandrillo (Grwp Llandrillo Menai) on Thursday, 25thOctober 2018.

Publication date: 30 October 2018

Prepare to be amazed by specimen collections at Brambell Natural History Museum

Brambell Natural History Museum, Bangor University will be joining museums from across the country for this year’s Welsh Museums Festival, which will be taking place from 27 October – 4 November.

This wonderful annual event is an opportunity for everyone who lives in Wales, or visiting over the half term, to engage with and explore the fantastic museums we have across Wales.  As ever, this year’s event will have a varied programme of events to cater for all tastes, which include exhibitions, re-enactments and workshops, through to Halloween themed activities.

Publication date: 24 October 2018

Edible crabs won't cope with the effects of climate change on seawater – new study

We are only just beginning to learn how aquatic organisms will respond to climate change, and the effect that this will have on their communities and ecosystems. One way to find out more is to look at whether species will be able to compensate for changes in their environment. Particularly if they can survive any immediate fluctuations in temperature, and reductions in ocean pH brought about by increasing levels of atmospheric CO₂.

This article by Nia Whiteley, Reader in Zoology (Aquatic), at the School of Natural Sciences is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Publication date: 23 October 2018

Harvesting environmental data with an app

Cambodia has one of the most rapidly developing economies on earth. The country is moving from a rural to an industrial and urban economy at great speed, but its government is also eager to be sustainable and not to lose valuable reserves of natural resources, in its drive to develop.

New research by social and environmental scientists at Bangor University, (Wales, UK); New York University (USA) and a Cambodian NGO, Keosothea Nou (Society for Community Development, Cambodia), one of 13 new projects funded under the ESRC Transformative research call, will provide an overall snapshot of the country’s environmental resources, and how they are used by different individuals. This information will help the government to develop sustainable policies for the energetic country.

Publication date: 23 October 2018

Bangor University student reaches semi-finals of national business competition

forestry student from Bangor University has reached the semi-finals of a national business competition run by a charity that supports student and graduate entrepreneurs. Jemima Letts, 21, has been shortlisted in the Tata Social Impact category for her business Tree Sparks, a social enterprise aiming to ignite conversation within 15-19 year olds about environmental awareness, as well as highlight that jobs within the environmental sector are viable for young people.

Publication date: 11 October 2018

The young Bangor fish entrepreneur who believes that any fin is possible

A 20 year old student at Bangor University is using his lifelong passion for marine biology to drive his ambitions to become the largest online livestock supplier of fish species in the UK. Sam Hamill, who is currently in his third year studying Marine Biology, is set to launch Big on Fish in November, an online shop and retail store selling aquarium equipment and stocking over 1,100 exotic fish and coral species.

Publication date: 27 September 2018

Surveying the Salamander’s Habitat in Honduras

A Bangor University student has just returned home from a six-week expedition to Honduras in Central America. Molly Mannion, 20, from Bangor has just completed the second year of her four-year MZool Zoology with Herpetology degree. 

Publication date: 30 August 2018

Research methods that find serial criminals could help save tigers

A geographic profiling tool used to catch serial criminals could help reduce the casualties of human-tiger conflict, according to scientists who collaborated on an innovative conservation research study.

Publication date: 28 August 2018