News: September 2019

Bangor Professor appears on The One Show

You’ll be spellbound by this fabulous film about 'love' on the shore and a 'seabed seductress' which was broadcast on popular BBC One programme The One Show recently. Prof Simon Webster  of the School of Natural Sciences explained to Miranda Krestovnikoff how the females of a common crab species that we find on our sea shores, attract a male and gains some protection into the bargain!

The film is seven minutes into the programme and is available here for 29 days.

Publication date: 19 September 2019

Doors open to Brambell Natural History Museum

There will be an opportunity for the public to visit Brambell Natural History Museum as part of the Open Doors events on Saturday 28 September 2019.

The Open Doors events gives the public the opportunity to have a look at some of Gwynedd and Conwy’s historical buildings, gardens and interesting and unusual locations all for free throughout September.

Publication date: 19 September 2019

Do nature shows deceive us into thinking our planet is fine?

Research into recent BBC and Netflix nature documentaries suggests that while they increasingly mention threats faced by the natural world, they rarely show the full extent of human-caused environmental destruction

There is overwhelming scientific consensus that nature is being severely affected by humans, the rate of species extinctions is accelerating, and that this has serious impacts. Nature documentaries have sometimes been criticised for failing to show the true extent of this environmental loss. A new study found that while recent high-profile nature documentaries talk more about the threats facing the inspiring natural wonders portrayed, nature is still mostly visually depicted as pristine and untouched, potentially resulting in a sense of complacency among viewers.

Publication date: 17 September 2019

A green revolution needn’t be dull with sustainable sequins!

With sequins remaining ‘on-trend’ in the world of ‘fast fashion’, one small company is hoping to add a little light of brilliance and sustainability by developing a biodegradable sequin.

Fast fashion is often criticised for increasing the amount of material sent to landfill. The craze for sequins only serves to add a literal ‘layer’ of unrecyclable plastic into that mix.

One company is hoping to change all that however. Rachel Clowes established The Sustainable Sequin Company a year ago to provide the fashion industry with a sustainable sequin.

Rachel is currently using recycled plastic to provide off the shelf and custom-made sequins of various shapes and sizes. Rachel’s recycled plastic sequins are the first step towards her goal of developing a compostable sequin, which when used on a biodegradable material, could see the whole garment degrading naturally once sent to landfill.

Rachel has turned to experts at Bangor University and has asked them to throw their considerable experience behind her challenge.

Publication date: 10 September 2019