Modiwl HXH-1002:
Birth of Modern Europe

Ffeithiau’r Modiwl

Rhedir gan School of History, Philosophy and Social Sciences

20 Credyd neu 10 Credyd ECTS

Semester 2

Trefnydd: Prof Tony Claydon

Amcanion cyffredinol

  1. A knowledge of the elements contributing to the birth of modern Europe in the period 1450-1550.
  2. An awareness of the different ways in which history may be interpreted and an ability to make choices between interpretations
  3. A mastery of basic study skills, particularly the ability to follow a course of reading, to make effective notes, to benefit from tutorial discussions, to write clear, cogent, evidence-based and fully-referenced essays, and to deploy knowledge and analysis in written examinations. Bibliographic skills, website analysis, and essay planning will receive particular emphasis. The course fits into the history programme by providing a chance for students to practice key skills they will need at levels 5 and 6: and to get a grounding in the early modern period, if they wish to concentrate upon this in their later study.

Cynnwys cwrs

The Renaissance; the processes of state formation; England and Wales under the early Tudors, Valois France; the career of the Emperor Charles V; Luther and the German Reformation; Henry VIII's break with Rome and the reformation in England.

Meini Prawf

C- i C+

These honours levels descriptors will be moderated to reflect the relative inexperience of Level 4 students at university study There are three grades for lower second-class performance: C+ (58%) Work will receive a C+ mark if it: shows evidence of solid reading, but remains partially superficial; covers the important aspects of the relevant field, but in some places lacks depth; advances a coherent and relevant argument; employs some evidence to back its points; and is presented reasonably well with only a few or no mistakes. It will also contain appropriate references and bibliography, which may, however, be slightly erratic and/or partially insufficient. C (55%) Work will receive a C mark if it: shows evidence of solid reading, but remains superficial; covers most of the important aspects of the relevant field, but lacks depth; advances a coherent and largely relevant argument; employs some limited evidence to back its points; and is presented reasonably well with only limited mistakes. It will also contain appropriate references and bibliography, which may, however, contain some mistakes or be slightly erratic and/or partially insufficient. C- (52%) Work will receive a C- mark if it: shows evidence of solid reading, but little knowledge of in-depth studies (for first-year work the student may not have read beyond a few standard works; at second or third year the student may not have read a good selection of journal articles and specialist monographs); covers most of the important aspects of the relevant field, but lacks depth or misses a significant area (for second- and third-year work this may mean that it fails to deploy the historical details found in specialist literature); advances a coherent, and sometimes relevant argument, but drifts away from tackling the task in hand (for example, by ordering the argument in an illogical way, becoming distracted by tangential material, or lapsing into narrative of only partial pertinence); usually employs evidence to back its points, but occasionally fails to do so or deploys an insufficient range; displays an awareness that the past can be interpreted in different ways, but may fail to get to the heart of the central scholarly debate or fully understand a key point (in second- and third-year work this may extend to a failure to discuss important subtleties or ambiguities in the evidence, or to a lack of awareness of the current state of historical or archaeological debate); is reasonably well presented and contains appropriate references and bibliography, but makes some mistakes in presentation or appropriate use.

trothwy

These honours levels descriptors will be moderated to reflect the relative inexperience of Level 4 students at university study

There are three grades for third-class performance: D+ (48%) Work is marked D+ if it: shows evidence of acceptable amounts of reading,but does not go much beyond what was referenced in lecture notes and/or a basic textbook; covers much of the necessary ground but fails to discuss one or a few vital aspects of a topic; deploys relevant material but partly fails to combine it into a coherent whole, or sustains a clear argument only for the greater part of the piece; deploys some evidence to support individual points, but sometimes fails to do so, or shows difficulty in weighing evidence, or chooses unreliable evidence; displays an awareness that the past can be interpreted in different ways but without devoting sustained discussion to this; is for the most part correctly presented but has sections where there are serious problems in presentation, style, spelling, grammar, or paragraph construction (but see section on dyslexia below); and uses references and bibliography where needed but occasionally misunderstands their appropriate use or makes mistakes in their presentation. D (45%) Work is marked D if it: shows evidence of an acceptable minimum of reading, based partly on lecture notes and/or a basic textbook; covers some of the necessary ground but fails to discuss some large and vital aspects of a topic; deploys some relevant material but partly fails to combine it into a coherent whole or sustains a clear argument for only some parts of the piece; deploys some evidence to support individual points but often fails to do so or shows difficulty weighing evidence or chooses unreliable, atypical or inappropriate evidence; shows some awareness that the past can be interpreted in different ways but the differences will not receive sustained discussion or analysis; is often correctly presented but has sections where there are serious difficulties in presentation, style, spelling, grammar, or paragraph construction (but see section on dyslexia below); and uses references and bibliography where needed but sometimes misunderstands their appropriate use or makes serious mistakes in their presentation. D- (42%) Work is marked D- if it: shows evidence of an acceptable minimum of reading, based largely on lecture notes and/or a basic textbook; covers parts of the necessary ground but fails to discuss some large and vital aspects of a topic; deploys some potentially relevant material but fails to bring it together into a coherent whole or sustains a clear argument for only parts of the piece; occasionally deploys evidence to back some individual points but often fails to do so or shows difficulty weighing evidence or chooses unreliable, atypical, or inappropriate evidence; may show some awareness that the past can be interpreted in different ways but the differences will not receive sustained discussion or analysis; is in part correctly presented but has sections where there are serious difficulties in presentation, style, spelling, grammar, or paragraph construction (but see section on dyslexia below); and uses references and bibliography where needed but sometimes misunderstands their appropriate use or makes serious mistakes in their presentation.

(v) Pass mark: work not of honours standard E+ (38%) Reading: Work may show evidence of reading—but this is largely cursory Content: Work discusses a limited number of the basic aspects of a topic, but leaves many out; or shows largely a limited knowledge of those it discusses; or is short weight; or makes major mistakes about the pattern of events. Argument: Work is mostly badly organized; or has a largely unclear argument; or makes an argument which is quite irrelevant to the task in hand. Analysis: Work deploys only a limited amount of evidence and tends more to express opinion without much support from historical fact (or archaeological evidence); or misuses evidence; or indicates only a limited sense that evidence can be interpreted in different ways. Presentation: Work makes some serious mistakes in presentation or writing style or in coherence; or makes some serious errors in grammar, spelling, or paragraph construction (but see guidelines on dyslexia below). Scholarly apparatus: Work prone to misuse references and bibliography, or inconsistent in recognizing when these are essential.

(vi) Fail Marks—not sufficient to pass the course There are a number of different grades for work that fails to meet the required standard. E (35%) Reading: Work may show some evidence of reading, although this is cursory Content: Work attempts to discuss a few of the basic aspects of a topic, but leaves many out; or shows a limited knowledge of those it discusses; or is clearly short; or makes gross mistakes about the pattern of events. Argument: Work badly organized; or has an unclear argument; or makes an argument which contains substantial irrelevance to the task in hand. Analysis: Work deploys little evidence, but rather tends primarily to express opinion without supporting this with historical fact (or archaeological evidence); or often misuses evidence; or shows little or no sense that evidence can be interpreted in different ways. Presentation: Work makes many serious mistakes in presentation or writing style or coherence; or makes many serious errors in grammar, spelling, or paragraph construction (but see guidelines on dyslexia below). Scholarly apparatus: Work may fail to use references and bibliography when these are essential. E- (32%) Reading: Work may show some evidence of reading, although this is very cursory Content: Work attempts to discuss a few of the basic aspects of a topic, but leaves many out; or shows a very limited knowledge of those it discusses; or is clearly short; or makes gross mistakes about the pattern of events. Argument: Work is badly organized; or has a very unclear argument; or makes an argument which contains substantial irrelevance to the task in hand. Analysis: Work deploys little evidence, but rather tends primarily to express opinion without supporting this with specific historical details or evidence (or archaeological evidence); or often misuses evidence; or shows little or no sense that evidence can be interpreted in different ways. Presentation: Work makes many very serious mistakes in presentation or writing style or coherence; or makes many serious errors in grammar, spelling, or paragraph construction (but see guidelines on dyslexia below). Scholarly apparatus: Work may fail to use references and bibliography when these are essential. F1 (25%) Reading: Work suggests minimal evidence of reading, although this appears very cursory Content: Work may discuss a couple of the basic aspects of a topic but leaves the rest out; or shows a very limited knowledge of those it discusses; or is very short; or makes very gross mistakes about the pattern of events. Argument: Work very badly organized; or has an obscure argument; or makes an argument which is very substantially irrelevant to the task in hand. Analysis: Work deploys minimal evidence, but rather tends willfully to express opinion without supporting it with historical details or evidence (or archaeological evidence); or largely misuses evidence; or shows no sense that evidence can be interpreted in different ways. Presentation: Work is overrun by serious mistakes in presentation or writing style or is incoherent; or lacks much sense of grammar, spelling, or paragraph construction (but see guidelines on dyslexia below). Scholarly apparatus: Work largely fails to use references and bibliography when these are essential. F2 (15%) Reading: Work indicates that very cursory or flawed or only irrelevant reading has been carried out Content: Work may discuss a basic aspect of a topic but leaves the rest out; or shows a very limited knowledge of those it discusses; or is very short; or makes very gross mistakes about the pattern of events. Argument: Work very badly organized; or has a very obscure argument; or makes an argument which is almost entirely irrelevant to the task in hand. Analysis: Work deploys minimal evidence, but rather tends willfully and colloquially to express opinion without supporting it with historical details or evidence (or archaeological evidence); or very seriously misuses evidence; or shows no sense that evidence can be interpreted in different ways. Presentation: Work is overrun by very serious mistakes in presentation or writing style or is incoherent; or lacks almost all sense of grammar, spelling, or paragraph construction (but see guidelines on dyslexia below). Scholarly apparatus: Work mostly fails to use references and bibliography when these are essential. F3 (5%) Reading: Work barely alludes to evidence of reading. Content: Work hints at discussing one of the basic aspects of a topic, but leaves the rest out; or shows only an entirely limited knowledge of those it discusses; or is exceedingly short; or makes exceedingly gross mistakes about the pattern of events. Argument: Work entirely disorganized; or has an incoherent argument; or makes an argument which is irrelevant to the task in hand. Analysis: Work deploys no evidence, but tends to assert opinion while ignoring any historical fact (or archaeological evidence); grossly misuses evidence; or shows no sense at all that evidence can be interpreted in different ways. Presentation: Work is devoid of accuracy in presentation or writing style or is incoherent; or shows no sense of grammar, spelling, or paragraph construction (but see the guidelines on dyslexia below). Scholarly apparatus: Work uses the minimum of references and bibliography, if at all, when these are essential. F4 (0%) Work will receive a zero mark if it is not submitted; if it is submitted after its deadline and penalized to this extent; if it is judged to have been produced by cheating (for example if it is guilty of plagiarism or duplication, or was written with the aid of illegal help in examinations); or if it is judged to be totally irrelevant to the task in hand (e.g. an essay wholly on the Second World War in answer to a question about the First World War); or is entirely devoid of the Pass criteria.

da

These honours levels descriptors will be moderated to reflect the relative inexperience of Level 4 students at university study There are three grades for upper second-class performance: B+ (68%) Work will receive a B+ mark if it is consistently strong in: covering the necessary ground in depth and detail; advancing a well-structured, relevant, and focused argument; analysis and deployment of an appropriate range of historical and/or archaeological evidence and consideration of possible differences of interpretation; and is correctly presented with references and bibliography where appropriate. B (65%) Work will receive a B mark if it: is clear that it is based on solid reading; covers the necessary ground in depth and detail; advances a well-structured, relevant, and focused argument; analyses and deploys an appropriate range of historical and/or archaeological evidence and considers possible differences of interpretation; and is correctly presented with references and bibliography where appropriate. B- (62%) Work will receive a B- mark if it: is clearly based on solid reading; covers the necessary ground in some depth and detail; advances a properly-structured, relevant, and focused argument; analyses and deploys an appropriate range of historical and/or archaeological evidence and considers possible differences of interpretation; and is correctly presented with references and bibliography where appropriate.

ardderchog

These honours levels descriptors will be moderated to reflect the relative inexperience of Level 4 students at university study There are four grades for first-class performance: A* (95%) At this level, first-class work earns its mark by showing genuine originality. It may advance a novel argument or deal with evidence which has not been considered before. Such originality of ideas or evidence is coupled with the standards of content, argument, and analysis expected of first-class work graded at A or A+. At this level, the work exhausts relevant secondary material, includes in dissertation work extensive and often unanticipated primary evidence, and betrays no factual or interpretative inaccuracy. It can also show a mastery of theory and deploy hypotheses subtly and imaginatively. In the case of essays and dissertations, work of this standard will be impeccable in presentation and will be publishable. A+ (87%) At this level, first-class work will also have its argument supported by an impressive wealth and relevance of detail, but will further deploy the evidence consistently accurately and give indications of deploying unexpected primary and secondary sources. It will habitually demonstrate a particularly acute and critical awareness of the historiography and/or archaeological debate, including conceptual approaches, and give a particularly impressive account of why the conclusions reached are important within a particular historical or archaeological debate. It will show a particularly sophisticated approach to possible objections, moderating the line taken in the light of counter-examples, or producing an interesting synthesis of various contrasting positions. It will be original work. The standards of content, argument, and analysis expected will be consistently first-class work. In essays and dissertations standards of presentation will be very high. A (80%) At this level, first-class work will have its argument supported by an impressive wealth and relevance of detail. It will usually also demonstrate an acute awareness of historiography and/or archaeological debate, and give an impressive account of why the conclusions reached are important within a particular historical or archaeological debate. It may show a particularly subtle approach to possible objections, moderating the line taken in the light of counter-examples, or producing an interesting synthesis of various contrasting positions. Overall, the standards of content, argument, and analysis expected will be consistently superior to top upper-second work. In essays and dissertations standards of presentation will be high. A- (74%) A first-class mark at this level is often earned simply by demonstrating one or more of the features of a good upper-second essay to a peculiar degree, for example presenting a particularly strong organization of argument, strong focus, wide range of reading, engagement with the historiography and/or archaeological debate, depth of understanding, an unobjectionable style, and strong presentation.

Canlyniad dysgu

  1. Mastery of study skills - particularly the ability to construct and present a bibliography, the ability identify and assess the value of websites as sources for historical research and knowledge, and essay planning.

  2. Knowledge of the later fifteenth and sixteenth centuries

  3. Awareness of different historical interpretations and the ability to judge between them

  4. The ability to form historical arguments and to back them up with evidence

Dulliau asesu

Math Enw Disgrifiad Pwysau
Bibliography 10
Essay 25
Exam 50
Essay Plan 15

Strategaeth addysgu a dysgu

Oriau
Private study

The course will require students to prepare for seminars and the assessment tasks by undertaking private study. This will include do reading from the reading list provided, following instructions for seminar preparation posted on Blackboard, planning and writing essays, and revising for exams.

170
Lecture

Lectures will provide a basic introduction to topics within the course - particularly setting up debates and differences of interpretation which should be explored further in private study, seminar discussions, and essay and exam answers,

22
Seminar

Seminars will provide opportunities for students to test their ideas in discussion, and so gain a greateri understanding of the topics involved; and to ask questions of the seminar leader about aspects of the contents of the course they feel they do not fully understand.

8

Sgiliau Trosglwyddadwy

  • Llythrennedd - Medrusrwydd mewn darllen ac ysgrifennu drwy amrywiaeth o gyfryngau
  • Hunanreolaeth - Gallu gweithio mewn ffordd effeithlon, prydlon a threfnus. Gallu edrych ar ganlyniadau tasgau a digwyddiadau, a barnu lefelau o ansawdd a phwysigrwydd
  • Archwilio - Gallu ymchwilio ac ystyried dewisiadau eraill
  • Adalw gwybodaeth - Gallu mynd at wahanol ac amrywiol ffynonellau gwybodaeth
  • Sgiliau Rhyngbersonol - Gallu gofyn cwestiynau, gwrando'n astud ar atebion a'u harchwilio
  • Dadansoddi Beirniadol & Datrys Problem - Gallu dadelfennu a dadansoddi problemau neu sefyllfaoedd cymhleth. Gallu canfod atebion i broblemau drwy ddadansoddiadau ac archwilio posibiliadau
  • Cyflwyniad - Gallu cyflwyno gwybodaeth ac esboniadau yn glir i gynulleidfa. Trwy gyfryngau ysgrifenedig neu ar lafar yn glir a hyderus.
  • Dadl - Gallu cyflwyno, trafod a chyfiawnhau barn neu lwybr gweithredu, naill ai gydag unigolyn neu mewn grwˆp ehangach
  • Hunanymwybyddiaeth & Ystyried - Bod yn ymwybodol o'ch cryfderau, gwendidau, nodau ac amcanion eich hun. Gallu adolygu ,cloriannu a myfyrio'n rheolaidd ar eich perfformiad eich hun ac eraill.

Sgiliau pwnc penodol

  • problem solving to develop solutions to understand the past
  • understanding the complexity of change over time; in specific contexts and chronologies
  • being sensitive to the differences, or the "otherness" of the past, and the difficulty to using it as a guide to present or future action
  • producing logical and structured arguments supported by relevant evidence
  • planning, designing, executing and documenting a programme of research, working independently
  • marshalling and critically appraising other people's arguments, including listening and questioning
  • demonstrating an innovative approach, creativity, collaboration and risk taking
  • preparing effective written communications for different readerships
  • making effective and appropriate use of relevant information technology
  • making critical and effective use of information retrieval skills using paper-based and electronic resources
  • critical evaluation of one's own and others' opinions

Adnoddau

Rhestr ddarllen

Breisach, E., Renaissance Europe, 1300–1517 (London, 1973). Cameron, E. (ed.), Early Modern Europe: An Oxford History (Oxford, 1999). Cunningham, A., and Grell, O. P., The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse: Religion, War, Famine, and Death in Reformation Europe (Cambridge, 2000). Elton, G. R., Reformation Europe, 1517–1559 (3rd edn., Oxford, 1999). Hale, J. R., Renaissance Europe, 1480–1520 (London, 1971). Hale, J. R., War and Society in Renaissance Europe, 1450–1620 (Leicester, 1985). Koenigsberger, H. G., Mosse, G. L., and Bowler, G. Q., Europe in the Sixteenth Century (2nd edn., London, 1989). Koenigsberger, H. G., Early Modern Europe, 1500–1789 (London, 1987). Mackenney, R., Sixteenth Century Europe: Expansion and Conflict (Basingstoke, 1993). Maland, D., Europe in the Sixteenth Century (London, 1973). Miskimin, H. A., The Economy of Later Renaissance Europe, 1460–1600 (Cambridge, 1977). Pettegree, A., Europe in the Sixteenth Century (Oxford, 2002). Rice, E. F., The Foundations of Early Modern Europe, 1460–1559 (London, 1971).

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