Latest News

We're working on a more accurate pollen forecasting system using plant DNA

Most people enjoy the warmer, longer days that summer months bring – but plant allergy sufferers will have mixed emotions. Roughly one in five Europeans suffers from allergic reactions to tree, grass and weed pollen causing pollinosis, hay fever and allergic asthma.

This article by Simon Creer, Professor in Molecular Ecology, School of Biological Sciences and Georgina Brennan, Postdoctoral Research Officer, Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 21 June 2018

Bangor Scientists travel to Peru to research life in thin air

Mountains literally take our breath away, not only because of the dramatic landscapes and distinctive cultures, but because every breath taken at high altitude contains less oxygen (known as hypoxia). Hypoxia places a considerable strain on the lungs, blood, heart and blood vessels as they work together to satisfy the body’s need for oxygen. Researchers from the School of Sport, Health and Exercise (Extremes Research Group) at Bangor University have a particular interest in understanding how humans adapt to life in thin air.

Publication date: 20 June 2018

‘Once in a lifetime’ rainforest research trip

Six days after getting married, lecturer Simon Willcock left his wife for a once in a lifetime trip to a ’lost world’- an isolated rainforest atop a large outcrop of volcanic rock in Mozambique.

A lecturer in Environmental Geography at Bangor University, since his PhD Simon has worked with a network of leading scientists whose interest include the study of remote and undisturbed rainforests.

Publication date: 19 June 2018

R.S. Thomas Festival, Aberdaron & Bangor

The annual festival celebrating the work of R.S. Thomas and his artist wife Mildred ‘Elsi’ Eldridge is to be held in his last parish at Aberdaron, at the tip of the Llŷn, on 29 June -1 July.

Professor Tony Brown, co-director of Bangor University’s R.S. Thomas Research Centre has been involved with the festival for some years. 

Publication date: 11 June 2018

Human cancer therapies successfully treat tumor-ridden sea turtles

Therapies used to fight human cancers successfully treat genetically similar tumors in sea turtles, a new study shows. In fact, turtles can survive their own tumors and help scientists better understand human cancers.

A disease, known as Fibropapillomatosis, has been rapidly spreading to sea turtles around the world. With the fibropapillomatosis virus come large tumors growing on sea turtles’ bodies and, for some turtles, death.  

Publication date: 7 June 2018

Response to the Reid report on research and innovation

Following today’s publication of Professor Graeme Reid’s review of Government-funded research and innovation in Wales, Bangor University’s Pro Vice-Chancellor for Research & Impact, Professor Jo Rycroft-Malone said: “Wales has a number of strengths in research and innovation and it’s important that we continue to support existing areas of excellence, as well as develop and nurture new areas of expertise.

Publication date: 6 June 2018

Calls for control as Asian Toads set to wreak havoc in Madagascar

Despite knowing how damaging the introduced cane toad was to Australian native wildlife, it seems that we humans have done it again.

Unless swift control measures can be taken, a non-native toad is set to cause havoc in Madagascar, home of many unique species found only on the island.

Publication date: 4 June 2018

How babies became the baked beans of the childcare world

Most of us are used to seeing crazy bargains when we go into the local supermarket, with items such as baked beans, bananas or milk being sold at a price that seems far below what they must cost to grow/make and sell. It’s a well-tried method – “loss leaders” are used to draw us into shops where we are also enticed to buy non-discounted items. So, unless we only plan to eat baked beans, our shopping basket usually gives the retailer an overall profit by the time we get to the checkout.

This article by David DallimoreWISERD Researcher, at the School of Social Sciences was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 30 May 2018

Five brain-boosting reasons to take up martial arts – at any age

This article by Ashleigh Johnstone, PhD researcher in Cognitive Neuroscience at the School of Psychology was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

We are all aware that exercise generally has many benefits, such as improving physical fitness and strength. But what do we know about the effects of specific types of exercise? Researchers have already shown that jogging can increase life expectancy, for example, while yoga makes us happy. However, there is one activity that goes beyond enhancing physical and mental health – martial arts can boost your brain’s cognition too.

Publication date: 8 May 2018

Working to safeguard the public against viruses and antibiotic resistant bacteria

Scientists working to reduce risk the risks to the public from exposure to viruses and antibiotic resistant bacteria in the water environment are meeting to share their research and discuss next steps today (14 March at the Royal Geographic Society, London).

Publication date: 14 March 2018