Latest News

R.S. Thomas Festival, Aberdaron & Bangor

The annual festival celebrating the work of R.S. Thomas and his artist wife Mildred ‘Elsi’ Eldridge is to be held in his last parish at Aberdaron, at the tip of the Llŷn, on 29 June -1 July.

Professor Tony Brown, co-director of Bangor University’s R.S. Thomas Research Centre has been involved with the festival for some years. 

Publication date: 11 June 2018

Human cancer therapies successfully treat tumor-ridden sea turtles

Therapies used to fight human cancers successfully treat genetically similar tumors in sea turtles, a new study shows. In fact, turtles can survive their own tumors and help scientists better understand human cancers.

A disease, known as Fibropapillomatosis, has been rapidly spreading to sea turtles around the world. With the fibropapillomatosis virus come large tumors growing on sea turtles’ bodies and, for some turtles, death.  

Publication date: 7 June 2018

Response to the Reid report on research and innovation

Following today’s publication of Professor Graeme Reid’s review of Government-funded research and innovation in Wales, Bangor University’s Pro Vice-Chancellor for Research & Impact, Professor Jo Rycroft-Malone said: “Wales has a number of strengths in research and innovation and it’s important that we continue to support existing areas of excellence, as well as develop and nurture new areas of expertise.

Publication date: 6 June 2018

Calls for control as Asian Toads set to wreak havoc in Madagascar

Despite knowing how damaging the introduced cane toad was to Australian native wildlife, it seems that we humans have done it again.

Unless swift control measures can be taken, a non-native toad is set to cause havoc in Madagascar, home of many unique species found only on the island.

Publication date: 4 June 2018

How babies became the baked beans of the childcare world

Most of us are used to seeing crazy bargains when we go into the local supermarket, with items such as baked beans, bananas or milk being sold at a price that seems far below what they must cost to grow/make and sell. It’s a well-tried method – “loss leaders” are used to draw us into shops where we are also enticed to buy non-discounted items. So, unless we only plan to eat baked beans, our shopping basket usually gives the retailer an overall profit by the time we get to the checkout.

This article by David DallimoreWISERD Researcher, at the School of Social Sciences was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 30 May 2018

Cultivating Chinese orchids could conserve wild species

Asking people who want to buy orchids about their preferences when choosing which plants to buy has revealed that many unknowingly buy wild, possibly endangered orchids, when they would be just as happy to buy commercially grown plants that meet their preferences for colour and price.

Publication date: 25 May 2018

Obese people enjoy food less than people who are lean – new study

Global obesity rates have risen sharply over the past three decades, leading to spikes in diabetes, arthritis and heart disease. The more we understand the causes of obesity and how to prevent it, the better.

We are interested in understanding reward-driven eating. Laboratory experiments have shown that obese people are less rewarded by food than people who are lean. We wanted to know if this held true when people were in a more natural environment – that is, going about their everyday lives.

This article by Hans-Peter Kubis, Director of the Health Exercise and Rehabilitation Group, School of Sport, Health & Exercise Sciences was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 25 May 2018

Improved financial regulation deters misconduct, study finds

Improved regulation has deterred a greater amount of financial misconduct in the UK since the global financial crisis, according to new research published today by the University of East Anglia (UEA) and others including ourselves.

Since the crisis of 2007, there has been increased awareness of the risks posed by the conduct of financial institutions and their employees. More incidents of financial misconduct have been investigated, with regulators applying increasingly large fines and demanding the repayment of profits.

Publication date: 24 May 2018

Five brain-boosting reasons to take up martial arts – at any age

This article by Ashleigh Johnstone, PhD researcher in Cognitive Neuroscience at the School of Psychology was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

We are all aware that exercise generally has many benefits, such as improving physical fitness and strength. But what do we know about the effects of specific types of exercise? Researchers have already shown that jogging can increase life expectancy, for example, while yoga makes us happy. However, there is one activity that goes beyond enhancing physical and mental health – martial arts can boost your brain’s cognition too.

Publication date: 8 May 2018

Working to safeguard the public against viruses and antibiotic resistant bacteria

Scientists working to reduce risk the risks to the public from exposure to viruses and antibiotic resistant bacteria in the water environment are meeting to share their research and discuss next steps today (14 March at the Royal Geographic Society, London).

Publication date: 14 March 2018