Research News: June 2017

Are people ‘rolling the dice’ when it comes to food safety?

A new study, conducted by a team of UK based researchers involving The University of Manchester, Bangor University and the University of Liverpool, known as the ENIGMA Project, has revealed the levels of bad behaviours in UK kitchens which increase the public’s risk of getting food poisoning.

Publication date: 29 June 2017

Artists and architects think differently compared to other people

Architects, painters and sculptors conceive of spaces in different ways from other people and from each other, finds a new study by University College London and Bangor University researchers.

When asked to talk about images of places, painters are more likely to describe the depicted space as a two-dimensional image, while architects are more likely to focus on paths and the boundaries of the space.

Publication date: 28 June 2017

Tech firms want to detect your emotions and expressions, but people don't like it

As revealed in a patent filing, Facebook is interested in using webcams and smartphone cameras to read our emotions, and track expressions and reactions. The idea is that by understanding emotional behaviour, Facebook can show us more of what we react positively to in our Facebook news feeds and less of what we do not – whether that’s friends’ holiday photos, or advertisements.

This might appear innocuous, but consider some of the detail. In addition to smiles, joy, amazement, surprise, humour and excitement, the patent also lists negative emotions. Possibly being read for signs of disappointment, confusion, indifference, boredom, anger, pain and depression is neither innocent, nor fun.

This article by Andrew McStay, Reader in Advertising and Digital Media, School of Creative Studies & Media Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 27 June 2017

The ATM at 50: how a hole in the wall changed the world

Next time you withdraw money from a hole in the wall, consider singing a rendition of happy birthday. For on June 27, the Automated Teller Machine (or ATM) celebrates its half century. Fifty years ago, the first cash machine was put to work at the Enfield branch of Barclays Bank in London. Two days later, a Swedish device known as the Bankomat was in operation in Uppsala. And a couple of weeks after that, another one built by Chubb and Smith Industries was inaugurated in London by Westminster Bank (today part of RBS Group).

This article by Bernardo Batiz-Lazo, Professor of Business History and Bank Management, Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 26 June 2017

Confidence can be a bad thing – here's why

Have you ever felt 100% confident in your ability to complete a task, and then failed miserably? After losing in the first round at Queen’s Club for the first time since 2012, world number one tennis player, Andy Murray, hinted that “overconfidence” might have been his downfall. Reflecting on his early exit, Murray said: “Winning a tournament is great and you feel good afterwards, but you can also sometimes think that your game is in a good place and maybe become a little bit more relaxed in that week beforehand.”

This article by Stuart Beattie, Lecturer of Psychology, Bangor University and Tim Woodman, Professor and Head of the School of Sport, Health and Exercise SciencesBangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 23 June 2017

How operational deployment affects soldiers' children

So many of us have seen delightful videos of friends and family welcoming their loved ones home from an operational tour of duty. The moment they are reunited is heartwarming, full of joy and tears – but, for military personnel who were deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan post 9/11, their time away came with unprecedented levels of stress for their whole family.

Military personnel faced longer and more numerous deployments, with short intervals in between. The impact of operational deployments on military personnel’s mental health is well reported. Far less is known, however, about how deployment affects military families, particularly those with young children.

This article by Leanne K Simpson, PhD Candidate, School of Psychology | Institute for the Psychology of Elite Performance, Bangor University was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 23 June 2017

Welsh schools teach pupils to be bilingual, not restrict their education

Being a Welsh-English bilingual isn’t easy. For one thing, you hear that encouraging others to learn your language is detrimental both to their education and wellbeing. For another, to speak a minority language such as Welsh you need to constantly make the effort to be exposed to it and maintain your bilingualism.

This article by Peredur Webb-Davies, Senior Lecturer in Welsh LinguisticsBangor University  was originally published on The Conversation.


Publication date: 23 June 2017

£1.8m funding for major new study into management of bleeding after childbirth

£1.8m funding from the UK National Institute of Health Research (NIHR) has been awarded to run a large study into the drug treatment of bleeding after childbirth (COPE).

Publication date: 21 June 2017

Bangor science project wins EU award

BREAD4PLA, a green science and technology project in which Bangor University’s research played a significant role, has been awarded one of the two ''Green Awards'' as one of the best LIFE Environment Projects of the last 25 years.

Publication date: 19 June 2017

Two prestigious RCBC awards for Bangor’s Institute for Health and Medical Research

BIHMR is delighted that Robert Goldsmith, NHS Physiotherapist based in Cardiff, and Patricia Masterson-Algar, a rehabilitation postgraduate researcher in Bangor University’s School of Healthcare Sciences, have both been successful in attracting Welsh Government RCBC Wales funding aimed at increasing collaboration and research capacity in nursing, midwifery and the allied health professions across Wales.

Publication date: 14 June 2017

'Facts are not truth': Hilary Mantel goes on the record about historical fiction

In a recent talk at the Hay literary festival, Cambridge historian and biographer John Guy said he had seen an increasing number of prospective students citing Hilary Mantel’s Booker Prize-winning historical novels, Wolf Hall and Bring up the Bodies, as supporting evidence for their knowledge of Tudor history.

This article by Michael Durrant, Lecturer in Early Modern Literature, School of English Literature,was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 13 June 2017

European tourists to Wales to have new window on the past

European tourists visiting Wales will be able to read historical accounts of visits to Wales through the ages via a new portal to be completed next year.

Publication date: 12 June 2017

Supporting the reds!

Bangor University’s School of Environment, Natural Resources & Geography and School of Biological Sciences are working with partners to support the reintroduction of red squirrels to the Ogwen Vally in nearby Bethesda, Gwynedd.

Publication date: 12 June 2017