Research News: June 2018

‘Once in a lifetime’ rainforest research trip

Six days after getting married, lecturer Simon Willcock left his wife for a once in a lifetime trip to a ’lost world’- an isolated rainforest atop a large outcrop of volcanic rock in Mozambique.

A lecturer in Environmental Geography at Bangor University, since his PhD Simon has worked with a network of leading scientists whose interest include the study of remote and undisturbed rainforests.

Publication date: 19 June 2018

R.S. Thomas Festival, Aberdaron & Bangor

The annual festival celebrating the work of R.S. Thomas and his artist wife Mildred ‘Elsi’ Eldridge is to be held in his last parish at Aberdaron, at the tip of the Llŷn, on 29 June -1 July.

Professor Tony Brown, co-director of Bangor University’s R.S. Thomas Research Centre has been involved with the festival for some years. 

Publication date: 11 June 2018

Human cancer therapies successfully treat tumor-ridden sea turtles

Therapies used to fight human cancers successfully treat genetically similar tumors in sea turtles, a new study shows. In fact, turtles can survive their own tumors and help scientists better understand human cancers.

A disease, known as Fibropapillomatosis, has been rapidly spreading to sea turtles around the world. With the fibropapillomatosis virus come large tumors growing on sea turtles’ bodies and, for some turtles, death.  

Publication date: 7 June 2018

Response to the Reid report on research and innovation

Following today’s publication of Professor Graeme Reid’s review of Government-funded research and innovation in Wales, Bangor University’s Pro Vice-Chancellor for Research & Impact, Professor Jo Rycroft-Malone said: “Wales has a number of strengths in research and innovation and it’s important that we continue to support existing areas of excellence, as well as develop and nurture new areas of expertise.

Publication date: 6 June 2018

Calls for control as Asian Toads set to wreak havoc in Madagascar

Despite knowing how damaging the introduced cane toad was to Australian native wildlife, it seems that we humans have done it again.

Unless swift control measures can be taken, a non-native toad is set to cause havoc in Madagascar, home of many unique species found only on the island.

Publication date: 4 June 2018