Modules for course M1AS | LLM/LS
LLM Law of the Sea

These are the modules currently offered on this course in the 2019–20 academic year.

You can also view the modules offered in the years: 2018–19; 2020–21.

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Year 1 Modules

Compulsory Modules

0 to 120 credits from:

  • September start must take:
  • SXL-4009: Legal Research Methods (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    The module will cover the following topics: using a Law Library, essay writing for Masters students, legal writing, identification and evaluation of sources, avoiding plagiarism, referencing correctly, compiling a bibliography, planning a dissertation project, writing a research proposal, identifying a dissertation research question, research methodologies, and doing a literature review.
  • SXL-4040: Public International Law (20) (Semester 1)
    In a nutshell, students will learn about the fundamental values, principles and rules of Public International Law. This will be a balanced course, with the essential elements of history, theory, law and practice being presented. Students will learn about the international legal system and the way that it works. They will be instructed in the structure, formation and sources of Public International Law and how it differs from domestic law, yet is deeply influenced by it. Students will learn about treaties, custom, general principles, decisions of courts of law and international institutions as well as read many of the writings of eminent authorities. They will study the interaction of international and domestic law, and the interplay between international relations, domestic politics and law. They will engage with some of the more specialised areas, which could include the Use of Force, State Responsibility or Jurisdiction and Immunities. Realpolitik is always present in International Law and the course will be contextualised. Students will be taught not just about the content of the rules, but also how to apply them, through examination of contemporary issues and situations of importance in International Law, and case studies. The approach taken in the course encourages critical thinking and reflection, as well the development of a global perspective.
  • SXL-4048: Law of the Sea (20) (Semester 2)
    The International Law of the Sea module will cover a myriad of contemporary uses of the sea and the legal problems that these bring to the international forum. The module also touches on aspects of maritime law, public international law, international criminal law and international environmental law. The module commences with an introduction to the history and development of the law of the sea before moving on to focus on the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea 1982 (LOSC). The first part of the module looks at each maritime zone in detail as laid out by the LOSC 1982, evaluating in turn: internal waters and the territorial sea, the contiguous zone, the exclusive economic zone, the continental shelf, the area, and the high seas; in addition to examining baselines, landlocked States and archipelagos. Part two of the module focuses on contemporary regulatory issues: • Whaling • Environmental disasters and the protection of the marine environment • Underwater cultural heritage and the salvage of historic shipwrecks • Fisheries and fishing • Piracy • Proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and arms at sea • Marine scientific research and the mining of resources • Settlement of marine disputes The module will also bring in any current events related to the law of the sea, so students will be able to relate their learning to real situations.
  • SXL-4300: Dissertation (60) (Semester 2)
    This module consists of researching and writing a Dissertation project in the field of Law, and in particular either Commercial law or the Law of Post-Devolution Wales. The Dissertation will be 15,000 words in length. The subject of the Dissertation will be confirmed in consultation with the supervising tutor and the Director of Postgraduate Studies. The student will be expected to show a clear understanding of the literature in their chosen field of study (primary and secondary sources), and, if the project involves empirical research, a familiarity with techniques of data collection and analysis.

0 to 120 credits from:

  • January start must take:
  • SXL-4040: Public International Law (20) (Semester 1)
    In a nutshell, students will learn about the fundamental values, principles and rules of Public International Law. This will be a balanced course, with the essential elements of history, theory, law and practice being presented. Students will learn about the international legal system and the way that it works. They will be instructed in the structure, formation and sources of Public International Law and how it differs from domestic law, yet is deeply influenced by it. Students will learn about treaties, custom, general principles, decisions of courts of law and international institutions as well as read many of the writings of eminent authorities. They will study the interaction of international and domestic law, and the interplay between international relations, domestic politics and law. They will engage with some of the more specialised areas, which could include the Use of Force, State Responsibility or Jurisdiction and Immunities. Realpolitik is always present in International Law and the course will be contextualised. Students will be taught not just about the content of the rules, but also how to apply them, through examination of contemporary issues and situations of importance in International Law, and case studies. The approach taken in the course encourages critical thinking and reflection, as well the development of a global perspective.
  • SXL-4048: Law of the Sea (20) (Semester 2)
    The International Law of the Sea module will cover a myriad of contemporary uses of the sea and the legal problems that these bring to the international forum. The module also touches on aspects of maritime law, public international law, international criminal law and international environmental law. The module commences with an introduction to the history and development of the law of the sea before moving on to focus on the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea 1982 (LOSC). The first part of the module looks at each maritime zone in detail as laid out by the LOSC 1982, evaluating in turn: internal waters and the territorial sea, the contiguous zone, the exclusive economic zone, the continental shelf, the area, and the high seas; in addition to examining baselines, landlocked States and archipelagos. Part two of the module focuses on contemporary regulatory issues: • Whaling • Environmental disasters and the protection of the marine environment • Underwater cultural heritage and the salvage of historic shipwrecks • Fisheries and fishing • Piracy • Proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and arms at sea • Marine scientific research and the mining of resources • Settlement of marine disputes The module will also bring in any current events related to the law of the sea, so students will be able to relate their learning to real situations.
  • SXL-4109: Legal Research Methods (20) (Semester 2)
    The module will cover the following topics: using a Law Library, essay writing for Masters students, legal writing, identification and evaluation of sources, avoiding plagiarism, referencing correctly, compiling a bibliography, planning a dissertation project, writing a research proposal, identifying a dissertation research question, research methodologies, and doing a literature review.
  • SXL-4300: Dissertation (60) (Semester 2)
    This module consists of researching and writing a Dissertation project in the field of Law, and in particular either Commercial law or the Law of Post-Devolution Wales. The Dissertation will be 15,000 words in length. The subject of the Dissertation will be confirmed in consultation with the supervising tutor and the Director of Postgraduate Studies. The student will be expected to show a clear understanding of the literature in their chosen field of study (primary and secondary sources), and, if the project involves empirical research, a familiarity with techniques of data collection and analysis.

Optional Modules

0 to 60 credits from:

  • September start choose 3 from:
  • SXL-4003: Marine Insurance (20) (Semester 2)
    The seminars will explore the nature and scope of the contract of insurance, evaluate its salient features, discuss the relationships between the parties to the contract and explain the application of insurance law in practice. In brief, the content includes an introduction to insurance law, examination of the statutes and common law of insurance, the fundamental principles of insurable interest, utmost good faith, subrogation, contribution and the principles of indemnity. In addition, the module examines the formation of insurance contract; the terms of contract; construction and causation; claims under policy; different types of insurance with a particular emphasis on marine insurance. The recent development of the case law and reform on Insurance Law are also discussed.
  • SXL-4041: International Criminal Law (20) (Semester 2)
    Students taking International Criminal Law will receive a balanced and thorough understanding of the fundamentals of International Criminal Law, with focus on individual criminal responsibility for international crimes. Students will examine the relevant laws and leading cases ranging from the judgements of the International Military Tribunals at Nuremberg and Tokyo to the explosion of jurisprudence that began with the ad hoc tribunals in the 1990s, but without neglecting cases such as Eichmann, Barbie and Calley from the ‘quiet’ period of the Cold War. They will develop a thorough understanding of the elements of Aggression, War Crimes, Crimes against Humanity and Genocide. Some time will be devoted to the International Law of Armed Conflict, which is essential for a complete understanding of the concept of War Crimes. This course will also provide instruction in fundamental principles underpinning International Criminal Law, such as the rights to fair trial and due process, and other essential concepts of justice such as the principles of legality (nullum crimen, nulla poena sine lege) and double-jeopardy (non bis in idem). Students will learn about the different forms of criminal responsibility as well as defences to crimes, jurisdiction and immunities that may prevent prosecution. It will be a balanced course, with the essential elements of history, theory, law and practice well covered. Students will be taught not just about the content of the rules, but also how to apply them, through examination of contemporary issues and situations of importance in International Law, and case studies. The approach taken in the course encourages critical thinking and reflection, as well the development of a global perspective. As this course is open to MA students as well as LLM students, the content of the course may need to be adjusted depending on the level of legal background of the students.
  • SXL-4042: International Human Rights Law (20) (Semester 1)
    Students taking International Human Rights Law will receive instruction in the history, theory, politics, law and international practice surrounding the concept of human rights, and learn about some of the many controversies. They will learn about how the human rights doctrine fits into the international order, and key legal concepts in human rights law such as jurisdiction, exhaustion of domestic remedies, derogations and margins of appreciation. Students will learn about the visionary Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the system that it inspired. The course will provide students with a thorough understanding of the international and regional systems for protection of human rights. They will, for example, learn about the United Nations, its organs and component parts that deal with human rights. The plan is also to provide students with some knowledge about the substantive content of a number of selected rights, in a comparative context. They will examine some of the many treaties which have been adopted under the auspices of the United Nations as well as various principles and bodies of rules which are not ‘hard law’ but of the ‘soft law’ category. Multimedia will be used, where possible. The approach taken in the course, with its combination of formal teaching, student participation with individual or group activities, and discussion, encourages critical thinking and reflection, as well the development of a global perspective. This will be a balanced course, with the essential elements of history, theory, politics, law and practice well covered.
  • SXL-4045: Int'nl Law of Armed Conflict (20) (Semester 1)
    Students taking SXL-4045 International Law of Armed Conflict will begin their studies with an overview of the distinction between the jus ad bellum and the jus in bello. Whereas the former regulates the resort to force, including the prohibition of use of force and the exceptions to this prohibition, the jus in bello is a distinct part of international law and will form the core part of the course. The jus in bello governs the conduct of hostilities and the protection of human life and dignity in times of armed conflict. We will begin with an introduction to the fundamental principles, such as humanity in war, which underpin legal regulation of conduct in armed conflict. Students will examine the scope and application of the laws of armed conflict, including key notions such as armed conflict itself, and critical distinctions such as international/non-international armed conflict, or civilians/combatants. By familiarising themselves with concepts such as targeting, immunity from attack, loss of immunity from attack and proportionality, students will study about the protection of combatants, civilians, cultural property and the environment as well as means and methods of combat in both international and non-international armed conflicts. There will also be coverage of the implementation and enforcement of the laws of armed conflict, including criminal repression of breaches and State responsibility. The final part of the course will examine current challenges, such as displaced persons and collective security operations, and the impact of international human rights law on these rules applicable in armed conflict, including differences and points of convergence.
  • SXL-4052: Int. Climate Change Law & Pol. (20) (Semester 2)
  • SXL-4125: Carriage of Goods by Sea (20) (Semester 2)

0 to 60 credits from:

  • January start choose 3 from:
  • SXL-4003: Marine Insurance (20) (Semester 2)
    The seminars will explore the nature and scope of the contract of insurance, evaluate its salient features, discuss the relationships between the parties to the contract and explain the application of insurance law in practice. In brief, the content includes an introduction to insurance law, examination of the statutes and common law of insurance, the fundamental principles of insurable interest, utmost good faith, subrogation, contribution and the principles of indemnity. In addition, the module examines the formation of insurance contract; the terms of contract; construction and causation; claims under policy; different types of insurance with a particular emphasis on marine insurance. The recent development of the case law and reform on Insurance Law are also discussed.
  • SXL-4041: International Criminal Law (20) (Semester 2)
    Students taking International Criminal Law will receive a balanced and thorough understanding of the fundamentals of International Criminal Law, with focus on individual criminal responsibility for international crimes. Students will examine the relevant laws and leading cases ranging from the judgements of the International Military Tribunals at Nuremberg and Tokyo to the explosion of jurisprudence that began with the ad hoc tribunals in the 1990s, but without neglecting cases such as Eichmann, Barbie and Calley from the ‘quiet’ period of the Cold War. They will develop a thorough understanding of the elements of Aggression, War Crimes, Crimes against Humanity and Genocide. Some time will be devoted to the International Law of Armed Conflict, which is essential for a complete understanding of the concept of War Crimes. This course will also provide instruction in fundamental principles underpinning International Criminal Law, such as the rights to fair trial and due process, and other essential concepts of justice such as the principles of legality (nullum crimen, nulla poena sine lege) and double-jeopardy (non bis in idem). Students will learn about the different forms of criminal responsibility as well as defences to crimes, jurisdiction and immunities that may prevent prosecution. It will be a balanced course, with the essential elements of history, theory, law and practice well covered. Students will be taught not just about the content of the rules, but also how to apply them, through examination of contemporary issues and situations of importance in International Law, and case studies. The approach taken in the course encourages critical thinking and reflection, as well the development of a global perspective. As this course is open to MA students as well as LLM students, the content of the course may need to be adjusted depending on the level of legal background of the students.
  • SXL-4042: International Human Rights Law (20) (Semester 1)
    Students taking International Human Rights Law will receive instruction in the history, theory, politics, law and international practice surrounding the concept of human rights, and learn about some of the many controversies. They will learn about how the human rights doctrine fits into the international order, and key legal concepts in human rights law such as jurisdiction, exhaustion of domestic remedies, derogations and margins of appreciation. Students will learn about the visionary Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the system that it inspired. The course will provide students with a thorough understanding of the international and regional systems for protection of human rights. They will, for example, learn about the United Nations, its organs and component parts that deal with human rights. The plan is also to provide students with some knowledge about the substantive content of a number of selected rights, in a comparative context. They will examine some of the many treaties which have been adopted under the auspices of the United Nations as well as various principles and bodies of rules which are not ‘hard law’ but of the ‘soft law’ category. Multimedia will be used, where possible. The approach taken in the course, with its combination of formal teaching, student participation with individual or group activities, and discussion, encourages critical thinking and reflection, as well the development of a global perspective. This will be a balanced course, with the essential elements of history, theory, politics, law and practice well covered.
  • SXL-4045: Int'nl Law of Armed Conflict (20) (Semester 1)
    Students taking SXL-4045 International Law of Armed Conflict will begin their studies with an overview of the distinction between the jus ad bellum and the jus in bello. Whereas the former regulates the resort to force, including the prohibition of use of force and the exceptions to this prohibition, the jus in bello is a distinct part of international law and will form the core part of the course. The jus in bello governs the conduct of hostilities and the protection of human life and dignity in times of armed conflict. We will begin with an introduction to the fundamental principles, such as humanity in war, which underpin legal regulation of conduct in armed conflict. Students will examine the scope and application of the laws of armed conflict, including key notions such as armed conflict itself, and critical distinctions such as international/non-international armed conflict, or civilians/combatants. By familiarising themselves with concepts such as targeting, immunity from attack, loss of immunity from attack and proportionality, students will study about the protection of combatants, civilians, cultural property and the environment as well as means and methods of combat in both international and non-international armed conflicts. There will also be coverage of the implementation and enforcement of the laws of armed conflict, including criminal repression of breaches and State responsibility. The final part of the course will examine current challenges, such as displaced persons and collective security operations, and the impact of international human rights law on these rules applicable in armed conflict, including differences and points of convergence.
  • SXL-4052: Int. Climate Change Law & Pol. (20) (Semester 2)
  • SXL-4125: Carriage of Goods by Sea (20) (Semester 2)