Research News: March 2018

We're mapping wartime shipwrecks to explore the past – and help develop green energy projects

Wartime shipwrecks such as the USS Juneau – recently discovered in the Pacific Ocean by philanthropist Paul Allen and his team – are of great interest to both military historians and the general public. 

Many such wrecks lie in extremely deep, relatively clear waters and are the legacy of naval battles fought far out to sea. But some of the technologies and methods that are being used to locate and identify such sites are now being employed by scientists in shallower, sediment-rich UK waters for similar – and very different – purposes.

This article by Michael Roberts, SEACAMS R&D Project Manager, Centre for Applied Marine Sciences, at the School of Ocean Sciences, was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 27 March 2018

A great year for signed languages in film – and what we can learn from it

Looking back at the films released in 2017, and those honoured at the Oscars, it is quite remarkable to note the prominence of signed languages. Three lms in particular stand out for their sensitive portrayals of signed languages as bona fide languages: Baby Driver, The Shape of Water and The Silent Child. Two of these films, Baby Driver and The Silent Child, also make an important contribution – both onscreen and off – towards recognising and respecting Deaf culture, identity, and community; they both have Deaf actors playing characters that demonstrate the importance of signed languages in their everyday lives.

This article by Dr Sara Louise Wheeler, Lecturer in Social Policy (Welsh medium) at the School of Social Sciences was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 26 March 2018

Hot baths help to prepare Team Wales for the heat of the Australian Commonwealth Games

With temperatures predicted to exceed 30°C on the Gold Coast of Australia the Commonwealth Games will place considerable heat strain on competing athletes.

In preparation for the heat, Team Wales athletes have been plunging into hot baths after their usual training. Rob Condliffe, a physiologist at Sport Wales Institute who is helping to prepare Team Wales athletes for the Commonwealth Games says, “The hot bath is an extremely practical evidence-based approach to heat acclimation”. 

Publication date: 26 March 2018

Bending light

Dr Liyang Yue at School of Electronic Engineering is the lead author of a paper recently published in the scientific journal "Optics Letters” which reports on a new way to produce a curved light beam, and which has created some interest among scientists since its recent publication.  

Publication date: 21 March 2018

We've located the part of the brain which understands social interactions

The ability to quickly detect and recognise the purpose of a social interaction is as indispensable today as it would have been to our ancient ancestors – but how does the brain do it?

This article by Jon Walbrin, PhD Researcher in Cognitive Neuroscience, at the School of Psychology, was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Publication date: 20 March 2018

Six common misconceptions about meditation

Dusana Dorjee, Bangor University Meditation has been hailed as a way to boost mental health, help chronic pain, reduce stress and build a new appreciation for the world around us. 

Publication date: 19 March 2018

Working to safeguard the public against viruses and antibiotic resistant bacteria

Scientists working to reduce risk the risks to the public from exposure to viruses and antibiotic resistant bacteria in the water environment are meeting to share their research and discuss next steps today (14 March at the Royal Geographic Society, London).

Publication date: 14 March 2018

All of Stanley Kubrick’s films were Jewish author finds

Jewishness threads through all of legendary director Stanley Kubrick’s films, a new book finds. Kubrick, who died almost twenty years ago, was famously silent on the meaning of his films. But a new study, Stanley Kubrick: New York Jewish Intellectual by Bangor University professor, Nathan Abrams, shows how it underpinned every film he made.

Publication date: 1 March 2018

Royal Support for Scaling Up Collaborative Coral Reef Conservation

Recently, HRH The Prince of Wales, drew attention to the economic drivers behind coral reef degradation and the investments required to ensure the long-term health of these vital marine habitats.  Professor John Turner and Dr Gareth Williams from the School of Ocean Sciences were among an invited audience of UN envoys, ambassadors, financiers, conservationists and reef managers to raise the urgency of scaling up resilience and recovery of the world’s coral reefs, with a particular focus on the role of the private sector and philanthropy.

Publication date: 1 March 2018