Module BSX-3152:
Life in Wetlands

Module Facts

Run by School of Natural Sciences

20 Credits or 10 ECTS Credits

Semester 2

Organiser: Dr Christian Dunn

Overall aims and purpose

The aim of this module is to give students a solid understanding in various aspects of wetland science. From zoological adaptations, to using wetlands to treat polluted waters; and from wetland conservation to reintroducing beavers to help fight climate change. The purpose of this module is to help students gain the skills and confidence they need to work in the growing field of wetland science, conservation and management. A series of practical workshops and assessments are therefore run, alongside lectures and fieldtrips, to help students achieve this.

Resource Implications of Proposal and Proposed Solutions: Wetlands. 2007. Mitsch W. and Gosselink J. Wiley and Sons. Wetland Ecology: Principles and Conservation. 2010. Keddy P. Cambridge University Press. Wetland Ecosystems. 2009. Mitsch W., Gosselink J., Zhang L. and Anderson C. Wiley and Sons.

Specific Resource Implications for Students: A pair of waterproof boots and waterproof clothing.

Course content

Wetland determination and delineation will be covered in detail, along with global wetland classifications. The wildlife of wetlands, with particular emphasis on animal species, will be a key part in many of the lectures and sessions. This area will also include specific zoological adaptations to cope with the stresses created by wetland conditions. Crucial wetland-biogeochemical cycles will be explained and the importance of wetlands, in terms of the ecosystem services they provide will be covered in-depth.

Assessment Criteria

good

A good student should have thorough factual knowledge across all aspects of the module, and be able to name examples where appropriate. Written answers should demonstrate an ability to think about the subject and to synthesise lecture material and some information from background reading. Practical reports should display a good level of understanding of data, analysis, interpretation and presentation

excellent

An excellent student should have a high levels of detailed factual knowledge across all aspects of the module, and be able to detail examples where appropriate. Written answers should demonstrate an ability to think critically about the subject and to synthesise lecture material and information from extensive background reading. Practical reports should display a high level of critical understanding of data, analysis, interpretation and presentation

threshold

A threshold student should have a basic knowledge of the essential facts and key concepts presented in the module. Written answers should demonstrate an ability to organise relevant lecture material into a coherent argument. Practical reports should demonstrate a basic ability to analyse data and interpret and present results

Learning outcomes

  1. Be able to communicate aspects of wetland science to different audiences (3.8, 3.10, 5.7)

  2. Be able to understand key wetland-biogeochemical cycles and complete some standard biogeochemical analyses (3.2, 3.3, 3.4, 3.6, 3.7, 5.7, 5.17)

  3. Understand the role wetlands play in a range of ecosystem services and understand the importance and key implications in the management and conservation of wetland habitats (3.2, 5.17)

  4. Know how animals have adapted to living in wetland ecosystems (3.2, 5.7, 5.17)

  5. Understand and appreciate the complexities in defining a wetland ecosystem and know the physical, hydrological and biological differences between different wetland habitats (3.2, 5.17)

Assessment Methods

Type Name Description Weight
Written assignment, including essay Press Release 20
Written assignment, including essay Report 40
EXAM End of Module Exam 40

Teaching and Learning Strategy

Hours
Private study

Private study to recap on lectures, prepare for future sessions, and complete assessments.

153
Lecture

20 hours of lectures covering the range of wetland science and which will include in-depth case studies for various issues presented, when possible, by guest lecturers from outside the university.

20
Laboratory

Fieldtrips to different wetland habitats in the local area will be undertaken and laboratory work will involve analysis of samples collected during these trips.

21
Workshop

A series of workshops and tutorials will cover various, specific writing skills; exam and assessment preparation, and feedback sessions.

6

Transferable skills

  • Literacy - Proficiency in reading and writing through a variety of media
  • Numeracy - Proficiency in using numbers at appropriate levels of accuracy
  • Computer Literacy - Proficiency in using a varied range of computer software
  • Exploring - Able to investigate, research and consider alternatives
  • Information retrieval - Able to access different and multiple sources of information
  • Inter-personal - Able to question, actively listen, examine given answers and interact sensitevely with others
  • Critical analysis & Problem Solving - Able to deconstruct and analyse problems or complex situations. To find solutions to problems through analyses and exploration of all possibilities using appropriate methods, rescources and creativity.
  • Safety-Consciousness - Having an awareness of your immediate environment, and confidence in adhering to health and safety regulations
  • Presentation - Able to clearly present information and explanations to an audience. Through the written or oral mode of communication accurately and concisely.
  • Teamwork - Able to constructively cooperate with others on a common task, and/or be part of a day-to-day working team
  • Argument - Able to put forward, debate and justify an opinion or a course of action, with an individual or in a wider group setting
  • Self-awareness & Reflectivity - Having an awareness of your own strengths, weaknesses, aims and objectives. Able to regularly review, evaluate and reflect upon the performance of yourself and others

Resources

Resource implications for students

A pair of waterproof boots and waterproof clothing.

Reading list

Wetlands. 2007. Mitsch W. and Gosselink J. Wiley and Sons.

Wetland Ecology: Principles and Conservation. 2010. Keddy P. Cambridge University Press.

Wetland Ecosystems. 2009. Mitsch W., Gosselink J., Zhang L. and Anderson C. Wiley and Sons.

Courses including this module

Optional in courses: