Module DXX-2009:
Conservation Practice

Module Facts

Run by School of Natural Sciences

20 Credits or 10 ECTS Credits

Semester 2

Organiser: Dr Simon Valle

Overall aims and purpose

1) To provide training in some of the skills used by professional conservationists (conservation monitoring, estimating population size, studying animal behaviour, management planning) 2) To ensure students understand responses to threats in biodiversity (both globally, nationally and locally)

Course content

1) To provide training in some of the skills used by professional conservationists: a) Conservation monitoring (some theory eg type I and type I errors, the concept of power) and introduction to some UK based and international schemes b) Study design and experimental design for conservation biology and ecology (stratification, precision and bias) c) Estimating population size (quadrats, mark and recapture, distance sampling, territory mapping); d) Measuring biodiversity across scales (diversity indices); e) Management planning and measurable indicators of conservation state including, including common standards monitoring and compliance monitoring. f) Understanding human behaviour 2) Understanding conservation responses: a) Buisness and biodiversity b) Biodiversity offsets and Payments for Ecosystem Services c) Landscape scale conservation d) local case studies of real world conservation projects.

Assessment Criteria

excellent

Grade A- and above Examination answers Summarise information given during the module, and acquired through background reading/study, and present it in a way that directly answers the question with elements of clear interpretation and discussion. Assessments Describe the objectives of the exercise and detail methods used to achieve the Objectives in a clear and concise manner. Present results in a clear and organised manner demonstrating understanding of relevant statistical results and being critical of their limitations as appropriate. Discuss the results largely using material in excess of that provided in class.

threshold

Grade D- to D+ Examination answers Summarise information given during the module and present it in a way that is relevant to the question Assessments Describe the objectives of the exercise and detail methods used to achieve the objectives. Present the results. Discuss the results using material provided in class.

good

Grade C- to B+ Examination answers Summarise information given during the module and present it in a way that directly answers the question with elements of interpretation and discussion. Assessments Describe the objectives of the exercise and detail methods used to achieve the objectives in a clear and concise manner. Present results in a clear and organised manner demonstrating understanding of relevant statistical results. Discuss the results largely using material provided in class.

Learning outcomes

  1. Understand the fundamentals of conservation management planning.

  2. Discuss and critically evaluate potential responses to biodiversity loss.

  3. Understand and be able to implement common field techniques used by conservation professionals and researchers.

  4. Apply principles of sampling and experimental design to studies in conservation.

  5. Structure a coherent written argument with reference to the literature.

  6. Write up a scientific report along standard structure including correct presentation of results and referencing to the wider literature.

Assessment Methods

Type Name Description Weight
Exam 50
Mid-Term Test 10
Mark & Recapture Practical report 0
Management Planning practical report 0
Office Use Only (best mark from submitted reports) 40

Teaching and Learning Strategy

Hours
Private study

Private study and guided self-study

160
Lecture

21 hours of lectures

21
Fieldwork

3*4 hour field practical classes/field visits

12
Practical classes and workshops

1*5 hour practical class

5
Practical classes and workshops

1*2 hour computer practical introducing the essentials of management planning.

2

Transferable skills

  • Literacy - Proficiency in reading and writing through a variety of media
  • Numeracy - Proficiency in using numbers at appropriate levels of accuracy
  • Computer Literacy - Proficiency in using a varied range of computer software
  • Self-Management - Able to work unsupervised in an efficient, punctual and structured manner. To examine the outcomes of tasks and events, and judge levels of quality and importance
  • Exploring - Able to investigate, research and consider alternatives
  • Information retrieval - Able to access different and multiple sources of information
  • Critical analysis & Problem Solving - Able to deconstruct and analyse problems or complex situations. To find solutions to problems through analyses and exploration of all possibilities using appropriate methods, rescources and creativity.
  • Safety-Consciousness - Having an awareness of your immediate environment, and confidence in adhering to health and safety regulations
  • Presentation - Able to clearly present information and explanations to an audience. Through the written or oral mode of communication accurately and concisely.
  • Teamwork - Able to constructively cooperate with others on a common task, and/or be part of a day-to-day working team

Subject specific skills

  • Develop and identify research question(s) and/or hypotheses as the basis for investigation.
  • Conduct fieldwork and/or laboratory work competently with awareness of appropriate risk assessment and ethical considerations
  • Recognize and apply appropriate theories and concepts from a range of disciplines.
  • Consider issues from a range of interdisciplinary perspectives.
  • Apply subject knowledge to the understanding and addressing of problems.
  • Collect, analyse and interpret primary and/or secondary data using appropriate qualitative and/or quantitative techniques.
  • Undertake field and/or laboratory studies of living systems.
  • Undertake practical work to ensure competence in basic experimental skills.
  • Understand the provisional nature of information and appreciate competing and alternative explanations.
  • Recognize the moral, ethical and social issues relating to the subject.
  • Collect and record data generated by a diverse range of methods.

Resources

Resource implications for students

Appropriate gear for outdoor research-this is essential. Students will not be allowed on trips if they don't come appropriately dressed.

Talis Reading list

http://readinglists.bangor.ac.uk/modules/dxx-2009.html

Pre- and Co-requisite Modules

Courses including this module

Compulsory in courses:

Optional in courses: