Module DXX-2016:
Field Course: Forestry

Module Facts

Run by School of Natural Sciences

20 Credits or 10 ECTS Credits

Semester 2

Organiser: Dr Mike Hale

Overall aims and purpose

This module gives students the opportunity to see the practical application of natural resource management principles that are discussed in other parts of the programme. During visits to areas which are managed for a range of objectives, they will meet and discuss with different stakeholders and collect information relevant to a specific research topic. The assessment develops students' understanding of: (1) the similarities and differences between current forestry policies in England, Scotland and Wales; (2) the impact of forest policy on state, private-sector and community forest management.

Course content

Forestry policies in England, Scotland and Wales: history, development and current policies; financial incentives and forestry grant schemes. Implications of forestry policies for forest management: case studies (by field visit) of state, private sector and community forests in England, Scotland and Wales. Ecosystem services from forests: provisioning, regulating and cultural services. Wood production as a provisioning service: case study (by field visit) of three forestry-wood-chains in south-west Scotland; determination of the profitability of the three chains. Recreation as a cultural service: case study (by field visit) of forests in northern England; evaluation of recreational facilities and their use.

Assessment Criteria

good

Grade C- to B+ Students will have a well-grounded understanding of current forestry policies in England, Scotland and Wales and their implications for forest management. They will be able to identify and give examples of the ecosystem services provided by forests, and explain their relative importance in England, Scotland and Wales. They will be able to give detailed descriptions of forestry-wood-chains and be able to describe and evaluate the recreational uses of forests.

excellent

Grade A- and above Students will have a comprehensive understanding of the current forestry policies in England, Scotland and Wales and be able to evaluate their implications for forest management. They will be able to describe and give numerous examples of the ecosystem services provided by forests, and be to discuss in detail their relative importance in England, Scotland and Wales. They will be able to give comprehensive and quantitative descriptions of forestry-wood-chains and be able to evaluate the recreationbal uses of forests in qualitative and quantitative terms.

threshold

Grade D- to D+ Students will be able to identify the main features of current forestry policies in England, Scotland and Wales and show some understanding of their implications for forest management. They will be able to identify the ecosystem services provided by forests. They will be able to give straightforward descriptions of forestry-wood-chains and the recreational uses of forests.

Learning outcomes

  1. Explain current forestry policies in England, Scotland and Wales

  2. Discuss the implications of these policies for state, private sector and community forest management

  3. Understand how to describe and analyse the multifunctional use of forests, and be able to apply this understanding to a particular forest situation

Assessment Methods

Type Name Description Weight
GROUP PRESENTATION Comparison of Forestry Strategies within the UK 25
LOGBOOK OR PORTFOLIO Study tour logbook 25
REPORT Individual report 50

Teaching and Learning Strategy

Hours
Private study

Private and guided self-study

156
Seminar

4*2 hour seminars

8
Fieldwork

5*6 hours of field practicals (including nights away from Bangor)

30
Seminar

1*6 hour conference

6

Transferable skills

  • Literacy - Proficiency in reading and writing through a variety of media
  • Numeracy - Proficiency in using numbers at appropriate levels of accuracy
  • Computer Literacy - Proficiency in using a varied range of computer software
  • Self-Management - Able to work unsupervised in an efficient, punctual and structured manner. To examine the outcomes of tasks and events, and judge levels of quality and importance
  • Exploring - Able to investigate, research and consider alternatives
  • Information retrieval - Able to access different and multiple sources of information
  • Inter-personal - Able to question, actively listen, examine given answers and interact sensitevely with others
  • Critical analysis & Problem Solving - Able to deconstruct and analyse problems or complex situations. To find solutions to problems through analyses and exploration of all possibilities using appropriate methods, rescources and creativity.
  • Safety-Consciousness - Having an awareness of your immediate environment, and confidence in adhering to health and safety regulations
  • Presentation - Able to clearly present information and explanations to an audience. Through the written or oral mode of communication accurately and concisely.
  • Teamwork - Able to constructively cooperate with others on a common task, and/or be part of a day-to-day working team
  • Mentoring - Able to support, help, guide, inspire and/or coach others
  • Argument - Able to put forward, debate and justify an opinion or a course of action, with an individual or in a wider group setting

Subject specific skills

  • Develop and identify research question(s) and/or hypotheses as the basis for investigation.
  • Conduct fieldwork and/or laboratory work competently with awareness of appropriate risk assessment and ethical considerations
  • Recognize and apply appropriate theories and concepts from a range of disciplines.
  • Consider issues from a range of interdisciplinary perspectives.
  • Apply subject knowledge to the understanding and addressing of problems.
  • Collect, analyse and interpret primary and/or secondary data using appropriate qualitative and/or quantitative techniques.
  • Awareness of the concepts of spatial and temporal scale in understanding processes and relationships.
  • Appreciation of the reciprocal nature of human-environmental relationships.
  • Apply appropriate techniques for presenting spatial and/or temporal trends in data.
  • Preparation of effective maps, diagrams and visualizations.
  • Engagement with current developments in the biosciences and their application.
  • Appreciation of the complexity and diversity of life processes through the study of organisms.
  • Understand the provisional nature of information and appreciate competing and alternative explanations.
  • Recognize the moral, ethical and social issues relating to the subject.
  • Collect and record data generated by a diverse range of methods.
  • Demonstrate awareness of the importance of risk assessment and relevant legislation
  • Demonstrate awareness of the importance of risk assessment and relevant legislation

Resources

Resource implications for students

Students will have to provide their subsistence costs for two meals, daily and will need water proof notebooks, waterproof clothing and boots.

Talis Reading list

http://readinglists.bangor.ac.uk/modules/dxx-2016.html

Reading list

This material is also posted via Blackboard and additional material is provided by host organisations and companies is posted on Blackboard

Courses including this module