Modules for course F103 | BSC/CIE
BSC Chem with Ind Exper

These are the modules currently offered on this course in the 2018–19 academic year.

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Year 1 Modules

Compulsory Modules

Semester 1

  • FXX-1101: Foundation of Chemistry 1 (10)
    Structure and bonding (12 lectures) - - Breakdown of classical mechanics, Bohr model of the atom, problems with Bohr's model, wave nature of particles, L de Broglie wave/particle duality, particle in a 1D box, extension to 2D, 3D. Born interpretation of the wavefunction, Heisenberg's uncertainty principle. Hydrogen atom (3 quantum numbers) and inclusion of spin, multi-electron atoms, radial distribution function. Pauli exclusion principle, bonding in diatomics, evaluating dipole moments. Covalent and Ionic bonding, shapes of molecules, and Periodic Table and periodicity (12 lectures/workshops) -: Bonding overview: covalent and ionic bonding overview. Shapes of molecules by VSEPR. Periodic properties including atomic and ionic radli, ionization energies, electron gain energies and electronegativities. Introduction to s, p and d-block chemistry. Organic chemistry (12 lectures). Brief overview on bonding theories, and the concept of resonance. The shape, hybridisation and bonding of alkanes, alkenes, and alkynes. Drawing structures and mechanisms: fundamental chemistry of alcohols, alkyl halides, alkenes and alkynes. Stereogenic centres its introduction to fundamental reaction mechanisms (substitution, elimination and addition). Acids/bases/nucleophiles and electrophile. Basic theory of aromaticity (Huckle rule, resonance etc) Course Team: Dr Dr K Hughes (12 lectures), Dr L Murphy (12 lectures), Dr I Perepichka (12 lectures), (Employability x 1hr - non credit bearing). RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS ESSENTIAL READING 1. Chemistry3 Burrows et al.* Publisher Open University Press (OUP) RECOMMENDED READING 1. Inorganic Chemistry, Housecroft and Sharpe, Publisher: Pearson* 2. Physical Chemistry P.W. Atkins, and J. De Paula, Publisher: OUP,*. 3. Organic Chemistry, J. Claydon, N. Greeves, S. Warren and P. Wothers*, Publisher: OUP*, 4. Periodic Table at a Glance, M.A. Beckett and A.W.G. Platt, Publishes: Blackwell, 2006 *Most Recent editions of these as they are regularly updated. SPECIFIC RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS FOR STUDENTS It is expected that students purchase essential textbooks.
  • FXX-1105: Instrumentation & Analytical M (20) Core
    CORE MODULE. This module is CORE to your degree programme. In order to progress to the next year of study you MUST successfully complete and pass this module. (1) Thin Layer Chromatography (2) Quantification of metals and non metals (3) Infrared (4) Mass spectrometry (5) Nuclear magnetic resonance (6) Using Techniques in Combination (7) UV/Vis (8) Basic electrochemistry (9) X-ray and electron diffraction, (10) Radiochemsitry (11) Gas Chromatography (12) High Pressure Liquid Chromatography Course Team: Dr E H Harper Laboratory & Teaching Academic (Lab Supervision). Semester 1 Introductory Lectures Dr L Jones, Dr M A Beckett, Dr P J Murphy, Dr L Murphy, Prof B Paizs Semester 2 Introductory Lectures Dr J Thomas, Dr L Jones, Dr I Butler, Dr C Gwenin, RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS ESSENTIAL READING - None RECOMMENDED READING 1. The Spectrometric Identification of Organic Compounds by Robert M. Silverstein, Francis X. Webster, and David Kiemle -John Wiley & Sons, 2005 2. Analytical Chemistry by Seamus P.J. Higson (2003) - OUP 3. Chemical Instrumentation (Oxford Chemistry Primers) by Richard P. Wayne 4. Fundamentals of Analytical Chemistry by Douglas A. Skoog, Donald M. West James F Holler (2003) - Brooks Cole 5.Crystal Structure Determination (Oxford Chemistry Primers) by William Clegg (1998) SPECIFIC RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS FOR STUDENTS - None
  • FXX-1106: Chemistry Laboratory 1 (10) Core
    Pre-requisites: A2 Chemistry CORE MODULE. This module is CORE to your degree programme. In order to progress to the next year of study you MUST successfully complete and pass this module. This practical course consists of a series of experiments covering the three principal areas of chemistry, namely inorganic, organic and physical chemistry. The experiments are chosen to familiarise with primary skills required for experimental chemistry and to illuminate theoretical background covered during chemistry lecture modules. Course Team : Dr E H Harper Laboratory & Teaching Academic (Lab Supervision). Semester 1 Introductory Lectures Dr L Murphy, Dr M Lahmann, Dr M A Beckett, Dr E H Harper RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS ESSENTIAL READING - None RECOMMENDED READING 1. Practical Skills in Chemistry (2nd Edition) John Dean, Alan M Jones , David Holmes , Rob Reed, Allan Jones, Jonathan Weyers SPECIFIC RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS FOR STUDENTS - None
  • FXX-1111: Computational and Study skills (10)
    This course provides a basic introduction to a range of topics that underpin undergraduate chemistry. Study skills including introduction to Bangor intranet and Blackboard, effective note taking, writing and oral communication, plagiarism and effective revision strategies will be delivered by chemistry staff. In addition a range of programs and databases which are utilised routinely by chemists will be introduced including Chemdraw and Web of knowledge. Course Team: Chemistry Study Skills Dr L Murphy (5 X 2 hr lectures/workshops), Computational Chemistry Dr M Lahmann (3 x 2hr (2 groups) workshops) RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS ESSENTIAL READING 1. Study and communication skills for the chemical sciences - Overton, Tina c2011 RECOMMENDED READING - None SPECIFIC RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS FOR STUDENTS Expected that students will purchase or have ready access to the essential text book above
  • FXX-1112: Maths Skills for Chemists (10)
    Basic arithmetic (18 hrs) - simple and partial fractions; algebra: BODMAS, quadratics and re-arranging equations; powers, logarithms and plotting data; the Binomial theorem and its applications to Mass Spectrometry and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Differential calculus (18 hrs) - proof by induction, functions and limits; simple derivatives; Chain / Quotient / Product rules; identification of stationary points; partial differentiation; indefinite and definite integrals; integration by substitution / parts; simple multiple integrals Course Team: Dr R A Davies RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS ESSENTIAL READING RECOMMENDED READING 1. 'Maths for Chemistry', P. Monk, OUP, 2nd Ed. 2. ‘Maths for Chemists’, M. Cockett, RSC Publishing, 2nd Ed SPECIFIC RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS FOR STUDENTS
  • FXX-1113: Working Chemistry 1 (10)
    This module reinforces fundamental concepts in inorganic (periodic properties, shapes of molecules using VSEPR), organic (functional groups, basic nomenclature of organic molecules, first reaction mechanisms, curly arrows), and physical chemistry (discrete energy, bonding and hybridisation) using a problem solving approach. Course Team: Dr E H Harper RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS ESSENTIAL READING 1. Chemistry3 Burrows et al.* Publisher Open University Press (OUP) *Most Recent editions of these as they are regularly updated RECOMMENDED READING - None SPECIFIC RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS FOR STUDENTS Expected that students will purchase or have ready access to the essential text book above

Semester 2

  • FXX-1103: Foundation of Chemistry 2 (20)
    Transition metal chemistry: (12h) Introduction to complexes and ligand types, coordination geometries and isomerism. Reactivity of aqua ions with NH3, OH-, and Cl-. Stability and formation constants. Qualitative description of complexes as labile or inert. The chelate effect (qualitative as an entropic effect) and polydentate ligands. Crystal field theory and ligand field theory applied to octahedral, square planar and tetrahedral complexes. OSSE. Consequences of spliting of d-orbitals - magnetic and optical properties. High spin and low spin complexes. Paramagnetism and spin-only formula. Colour of complexes and the spectrochemical series. Solid state structures: (12h) Packing of solids (close packed and non-closed packed structures). Metallic structures - ccp, hcp, bcc. Crystal structures of simple ionic compounds AB (ZnS, NaCl, CsCl) and AB2 (CaF2, TiO2,SiO2) systems. Radius ratio rule. Miller indices, crystal planes, and Bragg's Law. Polarizabilty of ions (Fajan's Rules) and giant covalent structures. Thermodynamics: (18h) Gas laws, expansion of gases under reversible and irreversible conditions. First law of thermodynamics, heat capacities, enthalpy, Derive expressions for thermodynamic (TD) quantities under reversible, irreversible, isothermal and adiabatic conditions. Thermochemistry Spontaneity and Entropy -> 2nd law of TD. Derive expressions for entropy under reversible, irreversible, isothermal and adiabatic conditions. 3rd law of TD, free energy - Gibbs and Helmholtz. Relationship between TD quantities, Gibbs energy changes with pressure, temperature, Define chemical potential. Chemical potential for multi-component and open systems, chemical equilibrium, Phase transformations, Mixtures. Kinetics: (6h) Relation to TD, definitions - reaction rate, reaction order, rate constant, molecularity. Derivation of 0th, 1st and 2nd order rate laws. Pseudo-1st order rns. Half lifes - 1st order and 2nd order. Temperature dependence of rate constant - Arrhenious expression, collision theory of bimolecular gas phase reactions. Extensions of the approach - steric effects, harpoon mechanism. Liquid phase processes. Functional group chemistry 2 (synthesis and reactions) (24h) Oxidation and reduction.,Aldehydes and ketones Enols and Enolates Carboxylic acids and derivatives.Reaction mechanisms (oxidation, reduction, esterification, hydrolysis) Retrosynthesis 1: functional group interconversions. Course Team: Dr M A Beckett (12 lectures), Prof B Paizs (18 lectures), Dr J Thomas (6 lectures), Dr P J Murphy (24 lectures), Dr L Jones (12 lectures), Employability (1 lecture - non credit bearing). RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS ESSENTIAL READING 1. Chemistry3 Burrows et al.* Publisher Open University Press (OUP) 2. Periodic Table at a Glance, M.A. Beckett and A.W.G. Platt, Publishes: Blackwell, 2006 RECOMMENDED READING 1. Inorganic Chemistry, Housecroft and Sharpe, Publisher: Pearson* 2. Physical Chemistry P.W. Atkins, and J. De Paula, Publisher: OUP,*. 3. Organic Chemistry, J. Claydon, N. Greeves, S. Warren and P. Wothers*, Publisher: OUP*, 4. Essential of Inorganic Chemistry 1 and 2, M.M.P. Mingos OUP, 1998. 5. Physical Chemistry Mortimer. 6. Thermodynamics of chemical processes. G. Price, OUP, 1998. 7. Structure and Bonding J. Barrett, RSC. 8. Core Carbonyl Chemistry, J.Jones, OUP,1997. 9. Organic Chemistry, M. Jones, Norton press, 2000. 10. *Most Recent editions of these as they are regularly updated. SPECIFIC RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS FOR STUDENTS It is expected that students purchase essential textbooks.
  • FXX-1104: The Chemistry of Us (10)
    This module introduces the major classes of biomacromolecules and medicinally active natural compounds and their relationships and relevant analytical techniques. Topics covered include an introduction to biomacromolecules (eg proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids), functional group chemistry of natural products, and a case study of medicinally active compounds. Trace elements, cofactors and vitamins will be introduced. A special emphasis will be placed on examples of chemistry relating to everyday life. This module illustrates key chemical principles through the chemistry found in nature, including reactivity, intermolecular interactions, structure, and function. This is achieved through a mixture of lectures, workshops and in-course assignments and problem-solving sessions. Course Team : Prof B Paizs, Dr M Lahmann, Dr L Murphy, Dr J Thomas The module comprises 7 hours lectures Dr Lahmann 6 hours lectures Prof Paizs 6 hours lectures Dr L Murphy 6 hours video lectures (timetabled directed self-study) 8 hours workshops (including 2 hours presentations) Dr J Thomas RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS ESSENTIAL READING 1. Chemistry3 Burrows et al.* Publisher Open University Press (OUP) RECOMMENDED READING - None SPECIFIC RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS FOR STUDENTS It is expected that students will purchase or have ready access to the essential text book above
  • FXX-1105: Instrumentation & Analytical M
    CORE MODULE. This module is CORE to your degree programme. In order to progress to the next year of study you MUST successfully complete and pass this module. (1) Thin Layer Chromatography (2) Quantification of metals and non metals (3) Infrared (4) Mass spectrometry (5) Nuclear magnetic resonance (6) Using Techniques in Combination (7) UV/Vis (8) Basic electrochemistry (9) X-ray and electron diffraction, (10) Radiochemsitry (11) Gas Chromatography (12) High Pressure Liquid Chromatography Course Team: Dr E H Harper Laboratory & Teaching Academic (Lab Supervision). Semester 1 Introductory Lectures Dr L Jones, Dr M A Beckett, Dr P J Murphy, Dr L Murphy, Prof B Paizs Semester 2 Introductory Lectures Dr J Thomas, Dr L Jones, Dr I Butler, Dr C Gwenin, RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS ESSENTIAL READING - None RECOMMENDED READING 1. The Spectrometric Identification of Organic Compounds by Robert M. Silverstein, Francis X. Webster, and David Kiemle -John Wiley & Sons, 2005 2. Analytical Chemistry by Seamus P.J. Higson (2003) - OUP 3. Chemical Instrumentation (Oxford Chemistry Primers) by Richard P. Wayne 4. Fundamentals of Analytical Chemistry by Douglas A. Skoog, Donald M. West James F Holler (2003) - Brooks Cole 5.Crystal Structure Determination (Oxford Chemistry Primers) by William Clegg (1998) SPECIFIC RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS FOR STUDENTS - None
  • FXX-1107: Chemistry Laboratory 2 (10) Core
    Pre-requisite: A2 Chemistry, FXX1106 CORE MODULE. This module is CORE to your degree programme. In order to progress to the next year of study you MUST successfully complete and pass this module. This practical course consists of a series of experiments covering the three principal areas of chemistry, namely inorganic, organic and physical chemistry. As a continuation of FXX1106, the experiments are chosen to further primary skills required for experimental chemistry and to illuminate theoretical background covered during chemistry lecture modules. Course Team: Dr E H Harper Laboratory & Teaching Academic (Lab Supervisor). Semester 2 - Introductory Lectures Dr R A Davies, Dr E H Harper, Dr M A Beckett. RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS ESSENTIAL READING - None RECOMMENDED READING 1. Practical Skills in Chemistry (2nd Edition) John Dean, Alan M Jones , David Holmes , Rob Reed, Allan Jones, Jonathan Weyers SPECIFIC RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS FOR STUDENTS - None
  • FXX-1114: Working Chemistry 2 (10)
    This module reinforces fundamental concepts in inorganic (coordination chemistry, transition metal chemistry, packing of solids, crystal systems), organic (functional groups, expanded nomenclature of organic molecules, reaction mechanisms, FGI), and physical chemistry (kinetics and thermodynamics) using a problem solving approach Course Team: Dr L M Murphy, Dr E H Harper RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS ESSENTIAL READING 1. Chemistry3 Burrows et al.* Publisher Open University Press (OUP) *Most Recent editions of these as they are regularly updated RECOMMENDED READING - None SPECIFIC RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS FOR STUDENTS Expected that students will purchase or have ready access to the essential text book above

Year 2 Modules

Year 3 Modules

Compulsory Modules

Semester 1

  • FXX-9000: Industrial Placement one year (120) Core
    You will attend a work placement, as arranged by yourself in conjunction with the School of Chemistry and taking into account personal preferences, for the duration of the academic year (minimum 9 months). The School will maintain contact with you throughout the year through your personal tutor. This contact will be by telephone, letter, visit or e-mail. You will be assigned an industrial supervisor at the placement location, who will be responsible for the day-to-day management of your work placement. A brief description of the plan for your placement (up to one A4 page) should be drawn up prior to commencing the placement and this should be sent to the Placement Officer in Chemistry. The nature of the placement can take many forms (e.g. one project that runs for the whole placement or several smaller projects). The placement can be in any area of chemistry (from commercial issues right through to research and development work). However, it is expected that your placement activities should contain an element of project work which can be written up in a report at the end of the placement (see below). At the end of the placement period, the industrial supervisor will be asked to complete a questionnaire on your attributes and progress and these marks will be a major component of the assessment of your industrial year (please see details below). The placement officer will be able to advise on this procedure if required. You will be expected to write-up your activities in the form of a final report (25-30 pages) which is assessed by your personal tutor and one other academic from the School of Chemistry. If deemed appropriate by the Company, part or all of this report can be marked as confidential and it will be marked and handled accordingly You will be expected to undertake academic work in addition to the industrial work during your placement year. This additional work will comprise 4 pieces as follows:- (1) Coursework - deadline end of September of the following year (2) Oral presentation to your industrial supervisor and your personal tutor. This will take place around Easter. You will be asked to arrange a convenient date for yourself, your industrial supervisor and your personal tutor. (3) Report on your industrial placement - deadline end of September of the following year (4) Oral Examination on your placement report - this exam should take place in November of the following year. The year in industry placement mark (year 3) will be incorporated into your final mark which determines your degree classification as follows:- Four Year BSc (Hons) Chemistry with Industrial Experience (F103) Four Year BSc (Hons) Environmental Chemistry with Industrial Experience (F142) Year 2 (16.5%), Year 3 (year in industry) (16.5%), Year 4 (67%) Five year MChem (Hons) Chemistry with Industrial Experience (F101) Year 2 (8.5%), Year 3 (year in industry) (8.5%), Year 4 (33%), Year 5 (50%) Course Team: Dr C Gwenin and Industrial Supervisor RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS ESSENTIAL READING - None RECOMMENDED - None SPECIFIC RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS FOR STUDENTS Students will be based at companies that may not be local to Bangor and will need to make appropriate accomodation/travel arrangements.

Semester 2

  • FXX-9000: Industrial Placement one year
    You will attend a work placement, as arranged by yourself in conjunction with the School of Chemistry and taking into account personal preferences, for the duration of the academic year (minimum 9 months). The School will maintain contact with you throughout the year through your personal tutor. This contact will be by telephone, letter, visit or e-mail. You will be assigned an industrial supervisor at the placement location, who will be responsible for the day-to-day management of your work placement. A brief description of the plan for your placement (up to one A4 page) should be drawn up prior to commencing the placement and this should be sent to the Placement Officer in Chemistry. The nature of the placement can take many forms (e.g. one project that runs for the whole placement or several smaller projects). The placement can be in any area of chemistry (from commercial issues right through to research and development work). However, it is expected that your placement activities should contain an element of project work which can be written up in a report at the end of the placement (see below). At the end of the placement period, the industrial supervisor will be asked to complete a questionnaire on your attributes and progress and these marks will be a major component of the assessment of your industrial year (please see details below). The placement officer will be able to advise on this procedure if required. You will be expected to write-up your activities in the form of a final report (25-30 pages) which is assessed by your personal tutor and one other academic from the School of Chemistry. If deemed appropriate by the Company, part or all of this report can be marked as confidential and it will be marked and handled accordingly You will be expected to undertake academic work in addition to the industrial work during your placement year. This additional work will comprise 4 pieces as follows:- (1) Coursework - deadline end of September of the following year (2) Oral presentation to your industrial supervisor and your personal tutor. This will take place around Easter. You will be asked to arrange a convenient date for yourself, your industrial supervisor and your personal tutor. (3) Report on your industrial placement - deadline end of September of the following year (4) Oral Examination on your placement report - this exam should take place in November of the following year. The year in industry placement mark (year 3) will be incorporated into your final mark which determines your degree classification as follows:- Four Year BSc (Hons) Chemistry with Industrial Experience (F103) Four Year BSc (Hons) Environmental Chemistry with Industrial Experience (F142) Year 2 (16.5%), Year 3 (year in industry) (16.5%), Year 4 (67%) Five year MChem (Hons) Chemistry with Industrial Experience (F101) Year 2 (8.5%), Year 3 (year in industry) (8.5%), Year 4 (33%), Year 5 (50%) Course Team: Dr C Gwenin and Industrial Supervisor RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS ESSENTIAL READING - None RECOMMENDED - None SPECIFIC RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS FOR STUDENTS Students will be based at companies that may not be local to Bangor and will need to make appropriate accomodation/travel arrangements.

Year 4 Modules

Compulsory Modules

Semester 1

  • FXX-3116: Project - Quadruple Module (40) Core
    CORE MODULE. This module is CORE to your degree programme. In order to progress to the next year of study or qualify for a degre you MUST successfully complete and pass this module. This practical module concentrates on an area of research in a sub-discipline (organic, inorganic, physical) of your choosing. You will be required to undertake chemical laboratory / computational / instrumental research for a considerable period of time each week (approx. 18 hours) and to write-up a 40 page report on your findings. Course Team: Project Supervisor, Research Committee Members (2) RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS ESSENTIAL READING - None RECOMMENDED READING - None SPECIFIC RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS FOR STUDENTS - None
  • FXX-3201: Separation Science (10)
  • FXX-3503: Research Skills (10)
    The main topics covered are:- 1. Identifying and retrieving chemical research information (from peer reviewed journals and academic databases) 2. Organising, summarising and integrating the chemical literature 3. Public understanding of science 4. Project management tasks- focusing on project planning and monitoring. 5. Understanding nature of the scientific method and ethics. 6. Have an awareness of current chemistry research (RSC lectures) 7. Participate in career/employability workshops. Course Team: Dr R Davies (3 lectures), Dr M Lahmann (3 lectures), Dr H Tai (6 lectures), Dr L Murphy (6 lectures), Dr M Beckett (3 lectures), Employability (1 lecure) non credit bearing. RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS ESSENTIAL READING 1. Study and Communication Skills for the Chemical Sciences Tina Overton, Stuart Johnson, and Jon Scott 2011 (OUP) RECOMMENDED READING none SPECIFIC RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS FOR STUDENTS It is expected that students will purchase or have ready access to the essential text books above
  • FXX-3507: Advanced Physical Chemistry (10)
    Techniques in Quantum Chemistry (12 hours) - Techniques in Quantum Chemistry - Introductory matrix algebra. Potential surfaces, minima and transition structures. Molecular mechanics. Hartree-Fock and density functional theories. Emphasis is on the techniques, reliability and current applications (including computer packages) of modern computational quantum chemistry in electronic structure theory. Techniques of geometry optimization. Chemical Dynamics (12 hours) The course begins with a brief introduction to statistical thermodynamics with the goal of introducing partition functions. Transition State theory is then discussed followed by a review and classification of potential energy surfaces. The course then focusses on quantum dynamics where the time-dependent Schroedinger equation is introduced. Course Team : Professor B Paizs, Dr K Hughes RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS ESSENTIAL READING Physical Chemistry, Atkins (OUP)* *Most recent editions of this as it is regularly updated. RECOMMENDED READING 1. Chemical Modeling from Atoms to Liquids, A Hinchcliffe, (John Wiley & Sons Ltd 1999) 2. Atoms in Molecules: Quantum Theory (The International Series of Monographson Chemistry No 22), Richard F. W. Bader, (OUP) 3. Reaction Dynamics, M. Brouard (Oxford Chemistry Primer 1998) 4. Chemical Kinetics and Dynamics, J.I. Steinfield, J.S. Francisco, W.L. Hase, 2nd edition, 1999 SPECIFIC RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS FOR STUDENTS It is expected that students will purchase or have ready access to the essential text books above
  • FXX-3510: Core Organic Chemical Concepts (10)
    Physical organic chemistry and synthesis This section details some principal physical-organic aspects. The characteristics of reactions, with emphasis on cyclization reactions, will be discussed in terms of the Frontier Orbital Theory and the Hammond principle. Organic chemistry inspired by Nature During this unit examples of natural product synthesis will be discussed and compared with the chemistry in biological systems. Some fundamental organic reactions will be revisited and related to the biological pathways. Course Team: Professor M Baird (10 lectures), Dr P Murphy (10 lectures) RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS ESSENTIAL READING 1. Organic Chemistry, Jonathan Clayden, Nick Greeves, Stuart Warren and Peter Wothers (2nd Ed 2012) RECOMMENDED READING 1. March's Advanced Organic Chemistry Reactions, Mechanisms and Structure, M B Smith and J. March (McGraw-Hill 2001) 2. Physical Basis of Organic Chemistry , H Maskill (OUP 1993) 3. Molecular Orbitals and Organic Chemical Reactions: by Ian Fleming. Student Edition Paperback 2009 Publisher Wiley-Blackwell SPECIFIC RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS FOR STUDENTS

Semester 2

  • FXX-3116: Project - Quadruple Module
    CORE MODULE. This module is CORE to your degree programme. In order to progress to the next year of study or qualify for a degre you MUST successfully complete and pass this module. This practical module concentrates on an area of research in a sub-discipline (organic, inorganic, physical) of your choosing. You will be required to undertake chemical laboratory / computational / instrumental research for a considerable period of time each week (approx. 18 hours) and to write-up a 40 page report on your findings. Course Team: Project Supervisor, Research Committee Members (2) RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS ESSENTIAL READING - None RECOMMENDED READING - None SPECIFIC RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS FOR STUDENTS - None
  • FXX-3505: Organomet Chem & Catalysis (10)
    The first section of the lecture course covers organometallic compounds and compounds. Basic concepts and terminology of organometallic chemistry, 18e Rule; electron counting. Survey of metal ligand bonding. The synthesis and reactions of organometallic compounds - eta1-alkyls; eta2-carbenes, alkenes, alkynes, eta3-allyls, eta4-butadienes, eta5-pentadienyls, eta6-arenes. The important reactions: oxidative insertion, reductive elimination, group migration (insertion), metathesis, dimerization, oligomerization and polymerisation. The focus is on the development of a basic understanding of organometallic ligands to give the ability to understand organometallic compounds in catalysis. The relative importance and value of heterogeneous and homogenous catalysis is studied. Catalytic reactions are selected from: hydroformylation (OXO process), Monsanto acetic acid process, alkene hydrogenations, asymmetric hydrogenations and metathesis reactions. Organics and Organometallics/Catalysis The synthesis of natural and non-natural compounds using organometallic chemistry particularly catalytic methodologies. Topics including nucleophilic substitution, cross coupling, cyclisation chemistry and metathesis will be covered. Course Team: Dr L Jones (12 lectures), Prof I Perepichka (12 lectures) RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS ESSENTIAL READING - None RECOMMENDED READING 1. Organometallics 1 - Complexes with transition-metal-carbon sigma-bonds, M Bochman, (OUP 1999) 2. Organometallics 2 - Complexes with transition-metal-carbon pi-bonds, M Bochman, (OUP 1999) SPECIFIC RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS FOR STUDENTS - None
  • FXX-3506: General Skills (10)
    This module also consists of sessions involving problem solving in organic, physical and inorganic chemistry. There is also a group based problem solving session. The course involves the students in précis writing and presentational skills as part of the assessment of this module. Course Team: Dr C Gwenin, Dr K Hughes, Dr I Butler. Dr L Murphy, Dr M Beckett, Dr P Murphy, Prof I Perepichka (Teaching) All Academic staff (assessments). RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS ESSENTIAL READING 1. Organic Chemistry, Clayden, Greeves, Warren and Wothers (OUP)* 2. Inorganic Chemistry, C E Housecroft, A G Sharp (Prentice Hall)* 3. Physical Chemistry, Atkins (OUP)* *Most Recent editions of these as they are regularly updated. RECOMMENDED READING none SPECIFIC RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS FOR STUDENTS It is expected that students will purchase or have ready access to the essential text books above
  • FXX-3508: Core Physical Chem Concepts (10)
    This module is comprised of two taught lecture courses containing materials on dynamic electrochemistry, crystallography, basic surface kinetics. Electrode Dynamics This part of the course aims to provide detailed analysis of the kinetics of reactions at metallic electrodes. Modern techniques for studying rates of electron transfer and mass transport will be discussed in detail. The course will terminate with examples on electrocatalysis and corrosion, to show how modern electrochemical techniques can be used to study electrode kinetics. X-ray/Neutron diffraction Revision of basic crystallography, reciprocal lattice, generators, atomic bases, calculation of structure factors from atomic scattering factors (6 lectures): Adsorption: comparison of different isotherms (e.g. Langmuir vs BET), basic surface kinetics (6 lectures). Course Team: Dr C Gwenin (12 lectures), Dr J Thomas (12 lectures). RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS ESSENTIAL READING 1. Physical Chemistry, Atkins (OUP)* *Most recent edition of this as it is regularly updated. 2. Electrode Dynamics (Oxford Chemistry Primers) A. C. Fisher RECOMMENDED READING 1. A first course in electrode processes: D. Pletcher 2. Electrochemical Methods: Bard and Faulkner Instrumental methods in Electrochemistry; Southampton Electrochemistry group SPECIFIC RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS FOR STUDENTS It is expected that students will purchase or have ready access to the essential text books above
  • FXX-3509: Advanced Org and Inorg Chem (10)
    This module covers inorganic reaction mechanisms and advanced organic synthesis with focus on asymmetric synthesis. Reaction Mechanisms. Classification of inorganic reaction mechanisms. What is a reaction mechanism? How are reaction mechanism studied? Kinetics. Reaction profiles for A, Ia Id and D mechanisms. Substitution at 4-coordinate transition-metal sites: Tetrahedral - Co-ordinatively saturated complexes (D mechanism); unsaturated complexes (A mechanism); competing mechanisms and temperature effects. Square-planar - Associative mechanisms and the role of solvent; evidence for a solvent intermediate; stereochemistry of substitution; influence of entering group (nucleophilicity scales); influence of spectator ligand (trans effect); influence of leaving group; dissociative mechanisms at square planar sites. Substitution at six-coordinate octahedral sites: role of solvent; the solvolysis reaction (leaving group; spectator ligands and stereochemistry); displacement of coordinated solvent (solvent exchange, inert/labile, CFAE, Eigen-Wilkins Id mechanism). Direct substitution without solvent interaction. Base catalysed hydrolysis (Dcb mechanism, tbp intermediate); acid catalysed hydrolysis; redox catalysed substitution. Electron-transfer reactions; classification of reactions: stoichiometry (complementary and noncomplementary reactions), mechanism (inner sphere and outer sphere); differentiation between inner and outer sphere reactions. Outer sphere reactions: self-exchange reactions and Marcus cross theory. This section of the module will revise and expand core concepts of selectivity and specificity, kinetic vs. thermodynamic control, regio- and stereo control. Also, strategies and challenges in ring formation will be discussed. The material will be illustrated with examples of total synthesis, examined both from the synthetic, retrosynthetic and mechanistic perspective. A particular emphasis will be on diastereoselective and asymmetric synthesis (resolution, asymmetric induction, chiral auxiliary, chiral pool, organo catalysis, bio catalysis, asymmetric catalysis) in the view of both research and industrial applications. Course Team: Dr M Beckett (12 lecutres), Dr M Lahmann (12 lectures) RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS ESSENTIAL READING 1. Inorganic Chemistry, 3rd Ed., C E Housecroft & A G Sharpe (Prentice Hall), 2008. 2. Organic Chemistry Jonathan Clayden, Nick Greeves, Stuart Warren and Peter Wothers (2nd Ed 2012) RECOMMENDED READING 1..Advanced Inorganic Chemistry, 5th Ed., Cotton & Wilkinson (Wiley) SPECIFIC RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS FOR STUDENTS - None