Module FXX-2209:
Tutorials

Module Facts

Run by School of Natural Sciences

10 Credits or 5 ECTS Credits

Semester 1 & 2

Organiser: Dr Vera Fitzsimmons-Thoss

Overall aims and purpose

The aims of this module are:- i) To reinforce knowledge of topics covered in second year chemistry modules (FXX 2201, 2203, 2205 - Semester 1 & FXX 2202, 2204, 2206 - Semester 2). ii) To enable students to apply that knowledge to a wide range of chemistry related problems. iii) To encourage students to improve their chemistry communication (written and oral) skills (formative skills)

Course content

This tutorial module uses workshops to reinforce knowledge gained on topics in inorganic chemistry (main group, d and f blocks, solid state), organic chemistry (carbanions, retrosynthesis, aromatics, radicals and polymers) and physical chemistry (group theory, bonding, kinetics and theoretical spectroscopy, applied maths for chemistry) using a problem solving approach.

Students will work in small peer groups within the larger class to discuss and defend approaches to problem solving. They will be given opportunities to informally present some of their strategies and answers to the larger class.

RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS ESSENTIAL READING 1. Chemistry3 Burrows et al. Publisher Open University Press (OUP), Organic Chemistry, Clayden, Greeves, Warren and Wothers (OUP) 2. Molecular Symmetry and Group Theory, Vincent 2nd ed (Wiley) 3. Inorganic Chemistry, C E Housecroft, A G Sharp (Prentice Hall) 4. Physical Chemistry, Atkins (OUP) *Most Recent editions of these as they are regularly updated Most Recent editions of these as they are regularly updated.

Assessment Criteria

threshold

Threshold (40%). Knowledge and understanding of the content covered in the course is basic; Problems of a routine nature are generally adequately solved.

excellent

Excellent (>70%). Knowledge base is extensive and extends well beyond the work covered in the module. Conceptual understanding is outstanding. Problems of a familiar and unfamiliar nature are solved with efficiency and accuracy; problem-solving procedures are adjusted to the nature of the problem.

good

Good (~60%). Knowledge base covers all essential aspects of subject matter dealt with in the programme and shows good evidence of enquiry beyond this. Conceptual understanding is good. Problems of a familiar and unfamiliar nature are solved in a logical manner; solutions are generally correct and acceptable.

Learning outcomes

  1. On successful completion of the module the student will be able to demonstrate problem solving skills to a range of problems whose subject matter is related to a range of 2nd year chemistry topics (content defined in modules FXX2201, 2202,2203, 2204, 2205, 2206).

  2. On successful completion of the module students will be able to demonstrate that they can communicate confidently (written) in the professional chemistry language on a intermediate user level

Assessment Methods

Type Name Description Weight
CLASS TEST Blackboard Test Semester 1

Open book Class Test - Timed and invigilated in computer room on site

50
CLASS TEST Blackboard Test Semester2:

Open book Class Test - Timed and invigilated in computer room on site

Exact date to be confirmed when semester 2 timetable is published

50

Teaching and Learning Strategy

Hours
Private study 88
Tutorial

Tutorials: Problem solving group sessions - 16 hours total timetabled at 4 x2 hour sessions once every two weeks each semester. Contact time 16 hours

12

Transferable skills

  • Literacy - Proficiency in reading and writing through a variety of media
  • Numeracy - Proficiency in using numbers at appropriate levels of accuracy
  • Computer Literacy - Proficiency in using a varied range of computer software
  • Self-Management - Able to work unsupervised in an efficient, punctual and structured manner. To examine the outcomes of tasks and events, and judge levels of quality and importance
  • Inter-personal - Able to question, actively listen, examine given answers and interact sensitevely with others
  • Critical analysis & Problem Solving - Able to deconstruct and analyse problems or complex situations. To find solutions to problems through analyses and exploration of all possibilities using appropriate methods, rescources and creativity.
  • Presentation - Able to clearly present information and explanations to an audience. Through the written or oral mode of communication accurately and concisely.
  • Teamwork - Able to constructively cooperate with others on a common task, and/or be part of a day-to-day working team

Subject specific skills

  • CC3 Skills in the practical application of theory using computational methodology and models
  • CC7 Information technology and data-processing skills, relating to chemical information and data.
  • PS1 Communication skills, covering both written and oral communication with a variety of audiences
  • PS3 Problem-solving skills, relating to qualitative and quantitative information
  • PS4 Numeracy and mathematical skills, including handling data, algebra, functions, trigonometry, calculus, vectors and complex numbers, alongside error analysis, order-of-magnitude estimations, systematic use of scientific units and different types of data presentation
  • PS8 Time management and organisational skills, as evidenced by the ability to plan and implement efficient and effective ways of working
  • SK2 Demonstrate a systematic understanding of fundamental physicochemical principles with the ability to apply that knowledge to the solution of theoretical and practical problems
  • SK3 Gain knowledge of a range of inorganic and organic materials
  • SK5 Demonstrate an understanding of the qualitative and quantitative aspects of chemical metrology and the importance of traceability
  • CC1 the ability to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of essential facts,concepts,principles and theories relating to theSubject areasCovered in theirProgramme
  • CC2 the ability to applysuch knowledge and understanding to thesolution of qualitative and quantitativeProblems that are mostly of a familiar nature

Resources

Resource implications for students

Expected that students will purchase or have ready access to the essential text books above

Talis Reading list

http://readinglists.bangor.ac.uk/modules/fxx-2209.html

Reading list

RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS ESSENTIAL READING 1. Chemistry3 Burrows et al. Publisher Open University Press (OUP), Organic Chemistry, Clayden, Greeves, Warren and Wothers (OUP) 2. Molecular Symmetry and Group Theory, Vincent 2nd ed (Wiley) 3. Inorganic Chemistry, C E Housecroft, A G Sharp (Prentice Hall) 4. Physical Chemistry, Atkins (OUP) *Most Recent editions of these as they are regularly updated Most Recent editions of these as they are regularly updated.

Pre- and Co-requisite Modules

Courses including this module