Module HXH-1004:
Intro Modern History1815-1914

Module Facts

Run by School of History, Philosophy and Social Sciences

20 Credits or 10 ECTS Credits

Semester 1

Organiser: Mr Martin Hanks

Overall aims and purpose

This module approaches the time between the Congress of Vienna and the outbreak of the First World War from a wide perspective, ranging from social structure to political and military history and from cultural trends to imperialism. It centres on Europe (including the British Isles). Students are expected to attend all lectures in order to gain a sense of the broad themes and how they interlock. Part of the module will introduce study skills and methodological approaches.

Course content

This module provides an introduction to nineteenth-century history, in particular: - Key events and dates - The political geography of Europe - Population and family structure - Urbanisation and emigration - Industrial Revolutions - Workers - Workers’ Political Movements - Revolutions - Middle Classes - Liberalism and Conservatism - Elites - Nationalism and Regionalism - State-building and Democracy - European imperialism

It also provides an introduction to basic study skills, in particular: - Searching literature and compiling a bibliography - Essay writing - Historiography - References, footnotes, plagiarism - Exam techniques and strategies

Assessment Criteria

threshold

Threshold students (D range) will demonstrate an appropriate range or depth of knowledge of at least parts of the relevant field and will make partly successful attempts to frame an argument that engages with historiographical controversies.

good

Good students (B range) will show a solid level of achievement in all learning outcomes. Work will be graded by considering content (the range of knowledge displayed); the directness and clarity of the argument; analysis (the ability to judge between interpretations and back arguments with evidence); and presentation [see Student Handbook for assessment criteria in these areas]. Answers will be expected to draw on specific examples and evidence; and to engage with current historiographical controversies.

excellent

Excellent students (A range) will show this level of achievement across the criteria combined with particularly impressive depths of knowledge and/or subtlety of analysis.

Learning outcomes

  1. Demonstrate a basic knowledge of the major issues, concepts and problems in nineteenth-century history.

  2. Show awareness that history may be interpreted in different ways.

  3. Apply basic study skills (e.g. compile a bibliography).

  4. Present historical arguments in essays and examinations, and back them with evidence.

Assessment Methods

Type Name Description Weight
Bibliography 20
2000-2500 word Essay 50
Essay Plan 30

Teaching and Learning Strategy

Hours
Lecture

Leture topics include: - Key events and dates - The political geography of Europe - Population and family structure - Urbanisation and emigration - Industrial Revolutions - Workers - Workers’ Political Movements - Revolutions - Middle Classes - Liberalism and Conservatism - Elites - Nationalism and Regionalism - State-building and Democracy - European imperialism - Searching literature and compiling a bibliography - Essay writing - Historiography - References, footnotes, plagiarism - Exam techniques and strategies

20
Seminar

There are no seminar presentations, but students are expected to come prepared to discuss the relevant issues. In order to be prepared for the seminar discussion, students should read the items listed for each week in the module handbook and take notes on their reading. You may wish to read further making use of the reading lists provided.

10
Private study

For each lecture topic (which are also the topics studied in essays) there is a reading list. Many of these identify key texts that are useful in studying a topic. This is not an A-level course, and the topics and reading are more complicated than at A-level. You must expect to read a good deal.

170

Transferable skills

  • Literacy - Proficiency in reading and writing through a variety of media
  • Numeracy - Proficiency in using numbers at appropriate levels of accuracy
  • Computer Literacy - Proficiency in using a varied range of computer software
  • Self-Management - Able to work unsupervised in an efficient, punctual and structured manner. To examine the outcomes of tasks and events, and judge levels of quality and importance
  • Exploring - Able to investigate, research and consider alternatives
  • Information retrieval - Able to access different and multiple sources of information
  • Inter-personal - Able to question, actively listen, examine given answers and interact sensitevely with others
  • Critical analysis & Problem Solving - Able to deconstruct and analyse problems or complex situations. To find solutions to problems through analyses and exploration of all possibilities using appropriate methods, rescources and creativity.
  • Presentation - Able to clearly present information and explanations to an audience. Through the written or oral mode of communication accurately and concisely.
  • Teamwork - Able to constructively cooperate with others on a common task, and/or be part of a day-to-day working team
  • Argument - Able to put forward, debate and justify an opinion or a course of action, with an individual or in a wider group setting
  • Self-awareness & Reflectivity - Having an awareness of your own strengths, weaknesses, aims and objectives. Able to regularly review, evaluate and reflect upon the performance of yourself and others

Subject specific skills

  • problem solving to develop solutions to understand the past
  • understanding the complexity of change over time; in specific contexts and chronologies
  • being sensitive to the differences, or the "otherness" of the past, and the difficulty to using it as a guide to present or future action
  • being sensitive to the role of perceptions of the past in contemporary cultures
  • producing logical and structured arguments supported by relevant evidence
  • planning, designing, executing and documenting a programme of research, working independently
  • marshalling and critically appraising other people's arguments, including listening and questioning
  • demonstrating a positive and can-do approach to practical problems
  • demonstrating an innovative approach, creativity, collaboration and risk taking
  • preparing effective written communications for different readerships
  • making effective and appropriate use of relevant information technology
  • making critical and effective use of information retrieval skills using paper-based and electronic resources
  • collaborating effectively in a team via experience of working in a group
  • appreciating and being sensitive to different cultures and dealing with unfamiliar situations
  • critical evaluation of one's own and others' opinions
  • engaging with relevant aspects of current agendas such as global perspectives, public engagement, employability, enterprise, and creativity

Resources

Resource implications for students

None, other than perhaps the acquisition of a few books.

Talis Reading list

http://readinglists.bangor.ac.uk/modules/hxh-1004.html

Courses including this module

Compulsory in courses:

Optional in courses: