Module ICL-1004:
Database Design and Management

Module Facts

Run by School of Computer Science and Electronic Engineering

20 Credits or 10 ECTS Credits

Semester 1 & 2

Overall aims and purpose

This module will provide the learners with the skills required to design, create and maintain a relational database. The skills gained will then help the learners to enter a commercially operated database environment and to administer the system to the requirements of the industry.

Firstly, the module is designed to develop an understanding of the fundamentals behind the efficient and effective organisation of data and data relationships. Secondly, it is designed to develop, by means of practical examples, the skills involved in using the SQL to create a database system and also how to manage and interrogate the information contained within the system.

Course content

● Fundamentals of database design – For example, Relationships between tables, Primary and Foreign Key, data integrity, fields, Data types(such as TEXT, DATE, NUMBER etc)

● Conceptual data modelling (Entity Relationship Model) – For example Logical relationships including One to one, one to many and Many to Many

● Relational design – functional dependency and normalisation (up to third normal form)

● Create a database structure using a suitable front end database. (Create tables, reports, forms and query the database)

● Create a database structure using SQL commands

● Develop SQL commands to maintain a database (CREATE, INSERT, UPDATE, ROLLBACK, COMMIT, JOIN, ALTER etc)

Assessment Criteria

excellent

The student’s understanding of the knowledge and skills base developed through this module is excellent, evidenced by the thorough application of theory linked to practice. At this level, the student has demonstrated a clear understanding of the scenario and practical concepts. The work should be of an excellent standard overall. The ERD designs will be correct on the whole and most of the cardinality or optionality, within the relationships will be correct. The student has included the relevant entities and attributes and has modelled them in an efficient manner to cover the scenario.

threshold

The student’s understanding of the knowledge and skills base developed through this module is limited, evidenced by the narrow application of theory linked to practice. At this level, the student has demonstrated limited understanding of the scenario and practical concepts. The work should be of a satisfactory standard but may have significant shortcomings in some areas. The ERD designs will show a lack of understanding. The student has included the relevant entities and attributes but may not have modelled them in an efficient manner leaving the final solution weak with many areas for improvement.

good

The student’s understanding of the knowledge and skills base developed through this module is rational, evidenced by the application of theory linked to practice. At this level, the student has demonstrated a good understanding of the scenario and practical concepts. The work should be of a good standard but may have missed some opportunities to improve in some areas. The ERD designs will be essentially correct but the student may have missed some of the cardinality or optionality, within the relationships. The student has included the relevant entities and attributes and has modelled them in an efficient manner but may have some areas for improvement.

Learning outcomes

  1. Demonstrate understanding of the principles of the relational database model, normalisation and functional dependencies.

  2. Analyse the data requirements of a system to a design and a relational model.

  3. Build a database to satisfy the data requirements.

  4. Demonstrate understanding of the principles of SQL

  5. Use reflection to assess personal performance.

Assessment Methods

Teaching and Learning Strategy

Hours
Tutorial

The tutor directed student learning will be supported by online learning materials hosted or signposted on the Grŵp VLE.

140
Lecture

The classroom-based element will include student-centred learning methods such as interactive lectures, case studies, group discussions and practical workshops.

60

Transferable skills

  • Literacy - Proficiency in reading and writing through a variety of media
  • Computer Literacy - Proficiency in using a varied range of computer software
  • Self-Management - Able to work unsupervised in an efficient, punctual and structured manner. To examine the outcomes of tasks and events, and judge levels of quality and importance
  • Critical analysis & Problem Solving - Able to deconstruct and analyse problems or complex situations. To find solutions to problems through analyses and exploration of all possibilities using appropriate methods, rescources and creativity.

Resources

Reading list

Beighly, L., 2007. Head First SQL , O’Reilly

Carter, J., 2003. Database design and programming with Access, SQL and Visual Basic . 2 nd ed. McGraw-Hill

Date, C.J., 2003. Introduction to Database Systems : 8 th ed. Addison Wesley.

Date, CJ and Darwen, H., 2006. Databases, Types and the Relational Model: The Third Manifesto , Addison Wesley.

Taylor, A.G., 2013. SQL for Dummies : 8 th ed. Wiley & Sons

Courses including this module

Compulsory in courses: