Modules for course L300 | BA/S
BA Sociology

This is a provisional list of modules to be offered on this course in the 2019–20 academic year.

The list may not be complete, and the final course content may be different.

You can also view the modules offered in the years: 2017–18; 2018–19.

Find out more about studying and applying for this degree.

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Year 1 Modules

Compulsory Modules

Semester 1

  • HPS-1002: Power, Freedom & the State (20) or
    SCY-1004: Cyflwyniad i Droseddeg (20)
    Mae'r fodiwl yn eich cyflwyno at faes trosedd a chyfiawnder troseddol. Trafodir theorïau a themau allweddol a ddefnyddir i egluro ymddygiad droseddol sy'n cynnwys esboniadau clasurol i'r rhai mwyaf cyfoes; y mesurau a ddatblygwyd i atal trosedd, ynghyd â gorolwg o'r system gyfiawnder troseddol sy'n cynnwys prif asiantaethau cyfiawnder troseddol, datblygiad hanesyddol, strwythur ac atebolrwydd y system.
  • SXY-1007: Intro to Criminal Justice (20)
    Part One of this module is intended to provide Level One students with a sound understanding of the ways in which in England and Wales, crime comes to the attention of the authorities, how crime is measured and investigated, how accused persons are brought to trial, and those who are convicted are sentenced and punished. This module takes an historical view of criminal law, the police, the criminal courts and the prision system, examining the significant social, economic, and philosophical changes that have helped to shape the modern criminal justice and penal systems. It examines the functions of the criminal justice agencies, explores some of the predominant ideas and theories about how the system operates and raises critical questions about the ways in which criminal justice is done and punishment is delivered. In Part Two the aim is to provide students with a thorough familiarity of major ways of thinking about crime, with reference to some of the main theoretical perspectives within criminology. This module provides an introduction to a range of criminological thought. Theoretical perspectives have been developed in an attempt to explain why people commit crime, and the history of thought on this question will be examined. The module considers the shifting definitions of crime and to offenders. Empirical concerns are likely to include to role of the media in crime construction, the use and abuse of drugs, the experiences of victims of crime and attitudes towards white-collar and organised crime.

Semester 2

  • HPS-1001: From the Cradle to the Grave? (20) or
    HAC-1001: Y Wladwriaeth Les (20)
  • SXY-1005: Introduction to Criminology (20)
    This module is intended to provide Level One students with a thorough familiarity with the major ways of thinking about crime, with reference to some of the main theoretical perspectives within criminology. This module provides an introduction to criminological thought, ranging from classical to strain theories of crime. Theoretical perspectives have been developed in an attempt to explain why people commit crime, and the history of thought on this question will be examined. The module considers the shifting definitions of crime over time and space, and explores the ways in which society responds to crime and criminals. Empirical concerns are likely to include the role of the media in crime construction, the use and abuse of drugs, the experiences of victims of crime and attitudes towards white-collar and organised crime.
    or
    SCY-1002: Cyflwyniad i Gyf Troseddol (20)
    Cyflwyniad i'r modd yr ymchwilir i drosedd yn Lloegr a Chymru, triniaeth y sawl sydd wedi eu cyhuddo ac ar brawf, yr euogfarnedig a systemau cosb. Edrychir yn hanesyddol ar wreiddiau cyfraith troseddol, llysoedd a'r carchar ynghyd â sut mae newid economaidd, athronyddol a chymdeithasol wedi siapio'r system gyfiawnder a chosb. Trafodir swyddogaethau'r asiantaethau cyfiawnder troseddol, prif syniadau a theoriau ar weithredu'r systemau, a chwestiynir yn feirnadol y modd y trosglwyddir cyfiawnder a chosb.

Optional Modules

40 credits from:

  • HXH-1002: Birth of Modern Europe (20) (Semester 2)
    The Renaissance; state formation; multiple monarchies (Valois France, the Habsburg Dominions, centre and peripheries in Britain and Ireland); the Reformation in Britain and on the Continent.
    or
    HXC-1003: Genedigaeth yr Ewrop Fodern (20) (Semester 2)
  • SXU-1002: Doing Social Research (20) (Semester 1)
    The course will cover the following topics: • What is Social Research? • Research design • The importance of ethics in social science research • Quantitative data collection, analysis and presentation (sampling, surveys, interviews, questionnaire research, content analysis and the use of secondary data in social research). • Qualitative data collection, analysis and presentation (ethnographies, qualitative interviews, observational research, focus groups, the uses of documents in social research. • An introduction to multi-method research. • Preparing for your dissertation
    or
    SCU-1001: Ymchwil Cymdeithasol (20) (Semester 2)
    Mae'r modiwl hwn yn canolbwyntio ar ddatblygu sgiliau ymchwil ar lefel gyffredinol a fydd yn sail i waith mwy ymarferol yn yr ail flwyddyn. Byddwch yn dysgu am seiliau cysyniadol a methodoleg ymchwil yn gyffredinol, a'r dewisiadau sydd ynghlwm wrth ddewis dull ymchwil arbennig. Bydd hyn yn eich paratoi ar gyfer sgiliau ar lefel mwy ymarferol ar draws y cwricwlwm ac yn enwedig parthad gwaith Treathawd Hir yn yr ail flwyddyn.
  • SXU-1003: Understanding Society (20) (Semester 1)
    This module introduces students to Sociology. The module runs over two semesters giving students a comprehensive sociological foundation to some of the key sociological issues and debates. The module introduces following aspects of social sciences: Semester 1 The nature of social sciences and relations between key disciplines and methods (2 weeks). Interaction and communication (2 weeks) Life course and the family (2 weeks) Gender and socialisation (2 weeks) Culture and media (2 weeks) Semester 2 Social stratification, Education and work (2 weeks) Organisations and institutions (2 weeks) The environment, urbanisation (2 weeks) Political Sociology and social movements (2 weeks) Globalisation (2 weeks)
    or
    SCS-1004: Cymdeithaseg a'r Byd Cyfoes (20) (Semester 1)
    Ceir cyflwyniad i'r prif theorïau cymdeithasegol, gan ganolbwyntio ar bersbectifau ffwythiannaeth a theori gwrthdaro. Edrychir ar waith Emile Durkheim a Karl Marx a'u gwaith arloesol mewn ffurfio theorïau cymdeithasegol cynnar. Yna edrychir ar sefydliadau cymdeithasol yn y gymdeithas gyfoes, gan gymhwyso'r theorïau a'r persbectifau at ddadansoddi sefydliadau fel y teulu, addysg, gwaith a dosbarth cymdeithasol.
  • HXC-1006: Cymru yn y Byd Modern (20) (Semester 1)
    Wythnos 1: Darlith: Deall Cymru fodern ac amcanion y modiwl Dim seminar Wythnos 2: Darlith: Meithrin Cymru fodern (i): Diwydiant ac economi Seminar: Siartiaeth a Beca Wythnos 3: Darlith: Meithrin Cymru fodern (ii): Trosedd, cosb a moesoldeb Seminar: Y Gymru fywgraffiadol: David Lloyd George fel astudiaeth achos Wythnos 4: Darlith: Themâu (i): Mewnfudo ac allfudo Seminar: Mewnfudo Wythnos 5: Darlith: Themâu (ii): Iaith, addysg a chrefydd yn y 19eg ganrif Seminar: Cenedlaetholdeb, Tynged yr Iaith Wythnos 6: Darlith: Themâu (iii): Effaith y ddau ryfel byd Seminar: Y Gymru Lafurol Gweithdy: Eidalwyr yng Nghymru Wythnos 7: WYTHNOS DDARLLEN Wythnos 8: Darlith: Themâu (iv): Merched a llunio Cymru fodern Seminar: Cerddoriaeth boblogaidd Wythnos 9: Darlith: Themâu (v): Diwylliant poblogaidd a newid cymdeithasol Seminar: Merched mewn llenyddiaeth Gymreig Wythnos 10: Darlith: Themâu (vi): Chwaraeon a hunaniaeth Seminar: Hunaniaeth Wythnos 11: Darlith: Materion (i): Y frwydr am hunan-reolaeth Seminar: Y Cwestiwn Cenedlaethol Wythnos 12: Darlith: Materion (ii): Creu Cymru newydd? Seminar: Sesiwn adolygu
    or
    HXW-1010: Wales since 1789 (20) (Semester 1)
  • HXH-1012: Modern Politics in Action (20) (Semester 2) or
    HXC-1012: GweithreduGwleidyddiaethFodern (20) (Semester 2)
  • HCH-1050: The Past Unwrapped (20) (Semester 1)
    1. Introduction: From Past to Present: Some ideas on how to make the best of your existing skills as you move to university-level study. Learn some of the basics of studying History and/or Archaeology at Bangor. 2. Library skills and making intelligent use of the web: Looking at what to expect in the university library, how to use reading lists, how much to read and what to do with all those electronic resources at your disposal. 3. From chaos to order: organisation and note-taking. How to plan and organise your work, and how to make wise decisions when taking notes from books, articles and lectures. 4. Avoiding plagiarism: Learn why cutting and pasting from the web is bad practice, and why academic misconduct is treated very seriously. Learn as well how to avoid this by referencing effectively i.e. using evidence, footnotes and compiling solid bibliographies. 5. Essays and making a good (grammatical) impression: Understand what the essay question actually wants you to do, how to structure your work, and how to develop an argument. Gain insight into some of the common errors in History and Archaeology essays, and see why good spelling and punctuation are crucial. 6. Historiography: How to make sense of all these academics saying different things and disagreeing with each other. What are the differences (and similarities) between ‘academic’ and ‘popular’ history? 7. Analysis and critical thinking: Or, how to move beyond just describing the past. Understand what your tutor means by telling you to be more critical. 8. Make your voice heard: competent communication: Understand why it’s important for you to communicate your ideas clearly, and how you can prepare effectively for presentations. 9. Documents and sources: Learn how historians use different types of documents and artefacts, and explore how you can analyse them yourself. 10. Far-reaching feedback: What is the purpose of feedback, and how are different types of assignments marked? Learn that you need to look beyond your mark to improve your work. 11. Exam technique: How to keep it together in exams, and how to deduce what exam questions actually want you to do.
    or
    HCC-1050: Dechrau o'r Dechrau (20) (Semester 1)
    1. Rhagarweiniad: O'r Gorffennol i'r Presennol: Rhai syniadau ar sut i wneud y defnydd gorau o'ch sgiliau presennol wrth i chi symud ymlaen i astudio ar lefel prifysgol. Dysgu rhai o egwyddorion sylfaenol astudio Hanes ac/neu Archaeoleg ym Mangor. 2. Sgiliau llyfrgell a defnyddio'r we yn ddeallus: Edrych ar yr hyn y dylech ei ddisgwyl yn llyfrgell y brifysgol, sut i ddefnyddio rhestrau darllen, faint i'w ddarllen a beth i'w wneud gyda'r holl adnoddau electroneg hynny sydd ar gael i chi. 3. O anrhefn i drefn: rhoi trefn ar bethau a chymryd nodiadau. Sut i gynllunio a threfnu eich gwaith, a sut i wneud penderfyniadau doeth wrth gymryd nodiadau o lyfrau, erthyglau a darlithoedd. 4. Osgoi llên-ladrad: Dysgu sut mae torri a phastio deunydd o'r we yn ffordd wael iawn o weithio a pham mae camymddwyn academaidd yn cael ei drin fel mater difrifol iawn. Dysgu'n ogystal sut i osgoi hyn drwy gyfeirnodi effeithiol, h.y. defnyddio tystiolaeth, troednodiadau a llunio llyfryddiaethau cadarn. 5. Traethodau a gwneud argraff (ramadegol) dda: Deall beth yn union mae cwestiwn y traethawd eisiau i chi ei wneud, sut i drefnu eich gwaith a sut i ddatblygu dadl. Cael golwg ar rai camgymeriadau cyffredin mewn traethodau Hanes ac Archaeoleg a gweld pam fod sillafu da ac atalnodi yn allweddol. 6. Hanesyddiaeth: Sut i wneud synnwyr o'r holl academyddion hyn yn dweud pethau gwahanol ac anghytuno â'i gilydd. Beth yw'r gwahaniaethau (a'r tebygrwydd) rhwng hanes 'academaidd' a 'phoblogaidd'? 7. Dadansoddi a meddwl yn feirniadol: Neu, sut i fynd ymhellach na dim ond disgrifio'r gorffennol. Deall beth mae eich tiwtor yn ei olygu pan fydd yn dweud wrthych am fod yn fwy beirniadol. 8. Cyfle i ddweud eich dweud: cyfathrebu medrus: Deall pam mae'n bwysig i chi gyfathrebu eich syniadau'n glir, a sut y gellwch baratoi'n effeithiol at gyflwyniadau. 9. Dogfennau a ffynonellau: Dysgu sut mae haneswyr yn defnyddio gwahanol fathau o ddogfennau ac arteffactau ac edrych sut y gellwch eu dadansoddi eich hun. 10. Adborth (sylwadau) pellgyrhaeddol: Beth yw diben adborth (sylwadau ar eich gwaith), a sut y caiff mathau gwahanol o aseiniadau eu marcio? Dysgu bod angen i chi edrych y tu hwnt i'ch marc i wella eich gwaith. 11. Sut i weithredu mewn arholiadau: Sut i beidio â chynhyrfu a gwneud yn dda mewn arholiadau, a gweld beth yn union mae cwestiynau arholiad yn gofyn i chi ei wneud.
  • VPR-1106: Intro: Judaism & Christianity (20) (Semester 1)
    The module outlines of some of the basic tenets of the Jewish faith as reflected in the Old Testament and the Christian faith as reflected in the New Testament. Among issues considered will be the contribution to the Jewish faith by the rabbis and the controversies faced by Judaism over the centuries, culminating in a discussion of issues relating to the holocaust. Among Jewish philosophers discussed will be Maimonides and Martin Buber. The modules will then turn to the Christian faith and will examine some of the theological issues arising from the New Testament, with a particular focus on Paul’s theology and the Early Church Fathers, such as Origen and Eusebius. There will also be a discussion of a representative sample of major Christian thinkers over the centuries.
  • VPR-1109: Introduction to Islam (20) (Semester 1)
    Islam is the world’s fastest growing religion, yet for most people its beliefs and practice remain obscure despite having close religious connection with Judaism and Christianity. For this reason, this module has been designed to provide a comprehensive introduction to Islamic faith, philosophy and practice. The module will introduce students to the study of Islamic theology by exploring the emergence and development of Islam, from its origins in the seventh century to its modern revival. Therefore, the module will guide students through the following aspects of the study of Islam: (1) Introduce students to the history and development of early and modern Islam (against the background of social and cultural contexts); (2) Examine core Islamic beliefs and practices; and (3) Investigate the wider Islamic tradition by surveying Islamic law, philosophy and mysticism.
  • Above is a list of suggested "optional" modules typically taken by students in the School of Social Sciences. However, you have the option of taking other "optional" year 1 modules from elsewhere in the University if you wish, subject to the approval of the home department and as long as the module from the other School does not clash with modules on your personal timetable. Please seek advice from your Personal Tutor or Year Co-ordinator. Alternatively, ask the Administrator for assistance [College Admin Building]

Year 2 Modules

Compulsory Modules

Semester 1

  • SXU-2001: Social & Political Research (20)
    This module is an introduction to social research. Primarily it is a practical course in the practices of research in social science. Covering the main elements of research design, question formulation, data collection and analysis it informs students of good practice in the area of survey design, cases studies and evaluation methods.
    or
    SCU-2001: Dulliau Ymchwil (20)
    Edrychir ar seiliau athronyddol ymchwil gymdeithasol, a'r gwahanol ddulliau sy'n deillio ohonynt. Trwy ddefnyddio'r syniad o'r 'Broses Ymchwil Ddelfrydol', gwelir sut mae angen datblygu bob cam o ymchwil maes mewn modd disgybledig a gofalus, er mwyn sicrhau dilysrwydd a dibynadwyedd. Ystytir sut i weithrediadu cysyniadau, adolygu'r lenyddiaeth berthnasol, ffurfio'r broblem i'w hastudio, diffinio'r newidynnau, creu damcaniaeth, dethol dulliau addas, samplo, a chreu offeryn ymchwil (holiadur/atodlen gyfweld).
  • SXU-2002: Contemporary Social Debates (20)
    There will be no set curriculum - rather this will emerge each time the module is taught depending on staff and student interests. The approach adopted will be to devote the first workshop to identifying themes and issues to be addressed, and to draw up the curriculum for that academic session in collaboration between staff and students. The workshop style of teaching and learning will allow emerging issues and contemporary debates to be addressed. Possible topics to be covered: Should drugs be legalised? Social control and the media Thinking critically about criminology Should there be a sociology of the environment? Exploring disaster capitalism Girls will be girls and boys will be boys – debunking the myth of gender. Exploring the relationship between inequality and capitalism Radicalisation, immigration, identity and racism. The Arab Spring Riots and civil liberties Thinking beyond the norm – the rationalization of ‘them’ and ‘us’
  • SXS-2035: Classical Social Theory (20)
    The module introduces the classic contributions of Marx, Tocqueville, Tonnies, Weber, Durkheim and Simmel and the development of their thinking concerning modernity, capitalism, rationalisation and bureaucracy, and the question of moral and social order. The module then considers how the classic tradition has been transformed and new paths have been pursued in the contexts of Parsons' 'system theory', symbolic interactionism, critical theory and feminist social theory.

Semester 2

  • SXS-2011: Identity & Diversity (20)
    The structure of the module covers following topics: 1. The nature of social diversity and identies. 2. The scope of social inequalities in the global, national and local contexts; 3. the class and economic inequalities; 4. Gender inequalities and sexualities; 5. Race and ethnicities; 6. Nationality; 7. Consumer culture and subcultures 8. New types of inequalities in global age.

Optional Modules

40 credits from:

  • HPS-2001: Work Placement - Semester 1 (20) (Semester 1) or
    HAC-2001: Lleoliad Gwaith - Semester 1 (20) (Semester 1)
  • SXY-2002: Crime & Justice in Mod Britain (20) (Semester 2)
    This module aims to build on the introduction to the criminal justice system in England and Wales provided in Year 1 through SXY1007. It will reinforce and advance students' understanding of various measures of crime, and how the main criminal justice agencies operate in particular circumstances and under the demands of increasing international concerns about certain types of crime. Thus, the role, responsibilities and levels of accountability of the main criminal justice agencies will be reviewed in the context of contemporary concerns about specific types of crimes and criminals, such as youth crime, terrorism and state crime, white collar, cyber and organised crime. The module will focus on advancing the discussion of the most dominant debates in criminal justice and penology. In doing so the module aims to advance students’ understanding of criminal justice statistics as well as the value of comparative analysis of criminal justice practices and procedures. Indicative Course content: - Understanding crime and criminal justice by numbers – breaking the back of crime statistics - Controlling youth crime - Controlling ‘clean’ crime – cyber-crime, business crime and white collar crime - Controlling ‘terror’ – state crime, organised crime and terrorism Underpinning these different topics will be an engagement with concepts of social harm and how criminal justice agencies are adapting to control the different types of crimes and criminals, nationally as well as internationally.
    or
    SCY-2003: Trosedd a Chyfiawnder (20) (Semester 2)
  • SXY-2004: Crime & the Media (20) (Semester 2)
    Media stories on crime and law are numerous. They form an object of inexhaustible interest to audiences. Many people learn about crime and law from the media, especially from newspapers, books and films. Media portrayals often contributed decisively to changes in public opinion and politics. Also, deviant behaviour can be influenced by media. Media construct deviance (e.g. by identifying `folk devils`), but media also offer cultural templates for people involved in deviant activities. The class deals with the cultural and political significance of media portrayals of crime and law. Students learn about economic, political, legal and other backgrounds. Major narratives employed by the media will be identified. The standard patterns of telling and other technical means of the media are analysed. The audience's reaction to media portrayals and its use of media also form a topic for the class.
  • HPS-2005: Work Placement - Semester 2 (20) (Semester 2) or
    HAC-2005: Lleoliad Gwaith - Semester 2 (20) (Semester 2)
  • SXP-2010: World Poverty and Inequality (20) (Semester 2)
    This module will examine the explanations for, and the experience of, poverty in the UK and in comparative perspective. It will aim to address the following aspects: 1. Defining poverty – how is poverty defined? What is social exclusion? How important is inequality? 2. Explaining poverty - how has the persistence of poverty been explained? This will look particularly at ‘pathological’ explanations involving a ‘culture of poverty’ or the existence of an ‘underclass’ 3. The risk of poverty – who is most at risk of being poor, and what are the possible consequences? 4. Experiencing poverty - what does it mean to be poor in the UK today? 5. Dimensions of poverty - what are the various dimensions of poverty, including income, wealth, health, education and housing. 6. International issues – can we ‘make poverty history’? 7. Confronting poverty – what policies are most effective against poverty? Is poverty or inequality the real problem?
  • SXP-2050: Issues in Equality (20) (Semester 1)
    Workshop topics include: How to help young people who are not in education, employment or training needs (NEETS); Encouraging more men into in care related professions; How to create inclusive work places for transgender employees and understanding/tackling hate crime.
  • VPR-2218: Sociology of Religion (20) (Semester 2)
    This module provides a comprehensive discussion of the classical and modern theoretical underpinnings of the sociological study of religion. The module will cover several theoretical topics and issues: Firstly, the origins of religious belief and practice will be explored by reviewing the major theories related to the debates on the social origin of religion. Secondly, the module will provide different theoretical foundations for understanding religion in modern social life, its culture and institutions. Thirdly, the module will identify common themes across religious traditions, providing broader insight into different understandings of religion, of those who practice religion, and how religious motivations and justifications affect the social world. Fourthly, these common themes will be examined within a sociological framework, which will be built on the contributions of both classical sociologists, such as Durkheim, Marx, Troeltsch and Weber, and recent sociologists.
  • VPR-2301: 20th Century Phil of Religion (20) (Semester 2)
    The module begins by clarifying the state of the analytic philosophy of religion at the turn of the 20th century, reflecting upon its inheritance of 19th century ‘modernity’. This is contrasted with some concurrent developments in the continental tradition (German Romanticism, Dostoevsky, Nietzsche). This is the context from which, and into which, Wittgenstein speaks. We will cover the early, middle, and late eras of Wittgenstein’s thought, and show the revolutionary impact that his thought had for the philosophy of religion. We track the various directions in which Wittgenstein’s influence was felt; for example, in A. J. Ayer’s verificationism, or those overtly ‘Wittgensteinian’ philosophers of religion such as D. Z. Phillips. The ‘meta-philosophy of religion’ is introduced throughout, as we tackle the question of how best to philosophise about religion.

Year 3 Modules

Compulsory Modules

Semester 1

  • SXS-3003: Theorizing Society & Politics (20)
    This module explores the origins, nature and significance of sociological theories and concepts developed in the 20th and 21st century. It examines the strengths and weaknesses of such approaches as critical theory (Adorno, Horkheimer, Marcuse et al) structuralism and neo-structuralism (Levi-Strauss, Foucault, Bourdieu), and feminist standpoint theory. It considers a range of theories which seek to address knowledge, power and subordination in terms of gender divisions and differences of class, race or sexuality. The module seeks to ask questions about the relationship between social theory, social action, sociological research and everyday life. This in turn encourages students to reflect on their own position as participants in social interaction.
  • SXS-3030: Globalisation & Social Change (20)
    Topics include: • theories of social change • demographical changes to the modern societies • debating and explaining globalisation • migration • capitalism and globalisation • politics, the state and globalisation • power and inequality in the global economy • globalisation movements • global culture

20 to 40 credits from:

  • HPS-3006: Dissertation (40) (Semester 1 + 2) or
    HAC-3006: Traethawd Hir (40) (Semester 1 + 2)
  • SXU-3010: Dissertation (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    The dissertation is a substantial piece of work. The completed dissertation submitted at level 6 (year 3) consists of a written piece of work of 10,000 words. Within this module students will build on work begun at level 5, and work towards the completion of the dissertation. This will involve the refinement or expansion of the literature review begun at level 5, and will include discussion of major themes arising from the literature. Research for the dissertation may include a small amount of primary empirical research, for example a qualitative or quantitative study conducted by the student under the direction of their supervisor. Throughout the module, students will be engaged mainly in developing their analysis of the literature and any other data collected, and in writing the dissertation.
    or
    SCU-3010: Traethawd Hir (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    Mae Traethawd Hir yn ddarn sylweddol o waith, yn cael ei gwblhau ar lefelau 2 a 3. Mae'r traethawd terfynol tua 10,000 o eiriau, ac yn cael ei gyflwyno yn y drydedd flwyddyn. Mae'n cyfrif fel pedair modiwl tuag at eich dyfarniad gradd terfynol. Yn y modiwl yma, byddwch yn parhau a'r gwaith a gychwynwyd gennych ar Lefel 2, a byddwch yn mynd ati i gwblhau'r Traethawd Hir. Bydd hyn yn cynnwys datblygu'r adolygiad llenyddiaeth a gychwynwyd gennych eisoes ar Lefel 2, sy'n trafod prif themau eich testun. Mae'n bosib y byddwch wedi cwblhau rhywfaint o ymchwil gwreiddiol (ond mae hyn yn opsiynol) - er enghraifft, peth gwaith ymchwil meintiol neu ansoddol gwreiddiol y byddwch wedi ei gynnal gyda chymorth a chyfarwyddyd eich goruchwyliwr/aig. Drwy gydol y modiwl, byddwch yn datblygu eich dadansoddiad o'r lenyddiaeth ac unrhyw ddata a gasglwyd, ac yn ysgrifennu eich traethawd.

Optional Modules

40 to 60 credits from:

  • HPS-3001: Work Placement - Semester 1 (20) (Semester 1) or
    HAC-3001: Lleoliad Gwaith - Semester 1 (20) (Semester 1)
  • HPS-3003: Race democracy * pol ideaology (20) (Semester 2)
  • SXY-3015: Crime & Power (20) (Semester 2)
    State crimes: from ghettos to genocide. How does criminology and criminal justice respond when it is the formal State who offends? How do we define crime, justice and victimisation in this context? Transnational and organised crimes: human trafficking and the international trade in sexual services and illegal substances are examples of crimes which transcend national boundaries. Interpersonal levels of crime and power: examples may include ‘honour’-based violence and coercion; homophobic hate crimes; gender violence in intimate relationships; what happens when the victim becomes the offender as in the case of battered women who kill? How do the law, society and criminal justice system respond to these forms of crime?
  • SXS-3040: Gender Perspectives (20) (Semester 2)
    Conceptualizing gender Feminisms Men and masculinities Social movements Families, intimacy and sexuality Gender and schooling Gender and work Gender and the media Representations of gender in popular culture Cyberspace and technology Methodologies Gender mainstreaming Gender from a worldwide perspective
  • SXP-3210: Issues in Housing (20) (Semester 1)
    This module introduces students to some of the key current issues in housing policy, concentrating on the three key areas of quantity, quality and affordability. It examines the factors affecting the supply of, and demand for, housing, and explores the characteristics of the different tenures people may experience during their housing careers, looking at contemporary issues in each housing tenure. The module will also examine housing standards, and the policies for maintaining housing quality, together issues of housing finance. It will explore the managerial context of social rented housing which has undergone considerable change both governmentally [through devolution] and administratively [through a changing mix of local authorities, housing associations and other social rented housing agencies].
  • NHS-3221: The Addicted Body (20) (Semester 2)