Modules for course M101 | LLB/LAW2
LLB Law (2 year)

These were the modules for this course in the 2017–18 academic year.

You can also view the modules offered in the years: 2018–19; 2019–20.

Find out more about studying and applying for this degree.

Use the buttons after the module titles (where available) to see a brief description of the content, or:
Show all descriptions
Hide all descriptions

Year 2 Modules

Compulsory Modules

Semester 1

  • SXL-2113: Criminal Law (20)
    The module will allow the student to study the modern English criminal law, in particular the law relating to: Introduction; Actus Reus; Mens Rea; Negligence and Strict Liability; General Defences; Parties to Crime; Inchoate Offences; Homicide; Non-fatal Offences against the Person; Offences under the Theft Acts 1968 and 1978: Theft and Related Offences; Offences involving Deception; Further Offences under the Theft Act; Criminal Damage; Sexual Offences.
  • SXL-2210: Public Law (20)
    The module comprises two distinct areas of law: constitutional law and administrative law. In addition, it provides students with an introduction to human rights law and the key provisions of the Human Rights Act 1998. Lectures on constitutional law include the sources of constitutional law, constitutional doctrines, the institutions of the Constitution and the influence of human rights law and EU Law on the Constitution. The section of the course devoted to administrative law provides an introduction to this area of law and focuses on the role of the judiciary and the workings of judicial review.
  • SXL-2211: Equity and Trusts (20)
    The module will allow the student to study the relationship between Equity and Common Law and cover areas of trusts as used for family or commercial or for public charitable purposes. A study will be made of express, resulting and constructive trusts of property, trustees powers and obligations and the nature and scope of fiduciary obligations. The student will be able to identify the nature and scope of equitable rights and equitable remedies including tracing, freezing injunctions, search orders, specific performance, imposition of personal liability to account as constructive trustee, estoppel entitlements to property or compensation and the developing principle of unconscionability.
  • SXL-2212: Contract Law (20)
    The module will provide the student with the foundations governing the formation and enforceability of contracts (promise, acceptance and agreement), areas of capacity, intention, legality and certainty of terms. The module includes the remedies available to the parties to a contract and the doctrine of privity of contract. The module will also cover an outline of the law of restitution.
  • SXL-2213: Introduction to Law (20)
    The module introduces the student to the English Legal System, providing a framework to study what is Law, how the system operates and the system in a social context. The module examines the court structure, both civil and criminal, the judiciary, lawyers and the role and significance of lay participation in the system (magistrates, juries and tribunal members) and the development of Human Rights Law. Where relevant, comparisons will be drawn to the Welsh body of law that is emerging from the devolved administration. Students will be encouraged to develop a critical analysis of the system as it moves into the 21st century, in comparison with other countries and with attention to its history.
  • SXL-2215: Legal Skills (20)
    The module introduces the student to practical legal study skills such as: effective note-taking, legal essay writing, legal problem solving, presenting an argument, mooting, team working, effective time management, revision techniques etc. Students will be guided in effective application of these skills to researching the law (using the law library, on-line sources, finding legislation, finding cases etc.), reading the law (reading legislation, reading law reports, reading academic legal literature etc.), constructing oral argument and defending legal argument, and analysing and evaluating the law.

Semester 2

  • SXL-2113: Criminal Law
    The module will allow the student to study the modern English criminal law, in particular the law relating to: Introduction; Actus Reus; Mens Rea; Negligence and Strict Liability; General Defences; Parties to Crime; Inchoate Offences; Homicide; Non-fatal Offences against the Person; Offences under the Theft Acts 1968 and 1978: Theft and Related Offences; Offences involving Deception; Further Offences under the Theft Act; Criminal Damage; Sexual Offences.
  • SXL-2210: Public Law
    The module comprises two distinct areas of law: constitutional law and administrative law. In addition, it provides students with an introduction to human rights law and the key provisions of the Human Rights Act 1998. Lectures on constitutional law include the sources of constitutional law, constitutional doctrines, the institutions of the Constitution and the influence of human rights law and EU Law on the Constitution. The section of the course devoted to administrative law provides an introduction to this area of law and focuses on the role of the judiciary and the workings of judicial review.
  • SXL-2211: Equity and Trusts
    The module will allow the student to study the relationship between Equity and Common Law and cover areas of trusts as used for family or commercial or for public charitable purposes. A study will be made of express, resulting and constructive trusts of property, trustees powers and obligations and the nature and scope of fiduciary obligations. The student will be able to identify the nature and scope of equitable rights and equitable remedies including tracing, freezing injunctions, search orders, specific performance, imposition of personal liability to account as constructive trustee, estoppel entitlements to property or compensation and the developing principle of unconscionability.
  • SXL-2212: Contract Law
    The module will provide the student with the foundations governing the formation and enforceability of contracts (promise, acceptance and agreement), areas of capacity, intention, legality and certainty of terms. The module includes the remedies available to the parties to a contract and the doctrine of privity of contract. The module will also cover an outline of the law of restitution.
  • SXL-2213: Introduction to Law
    The module introduces the student to the English Legal System, providing a framework to study what is Law, how the system operates and the system in a social context. The module examines the court structure, both civil and criminal, the judiciary, lawyers and the role and significance of lay participation in the system (magistrates, juries and tribunal members) and the development of Human Rights Law. Where relevant, comparisons will be drawn to the Welsh body of law that is emerging from the devolved administration. Students will be encouraged to develop a critical analysis of the system as it moves into the 21st century, in comparison with other countries and with attention to its history.
  • SXL-2215: Legal Skills
    The module introduces the student to practical legal study skills such as: effective note-taking, legal essay writing, legal problem solving, presenting an argument, mooting, team working, effective time management, revision techniques etc. Students will be guided in effective application of these skills to researching the law (using the law library, on-line sources, finding legislation, finding cases etc.), reading the law (reading legislation, reading law reports, reading academic legal literature etc.), constructing oral argument and defending legal argument, and analysing and evaluating the law.

Year 3 Modules

Compulsory Modules

Semester 1

  • SXL-3111: Land Law (20)
    The module will allow the student to study English and Welsh land law, including the nature of land, the development of land law, the law relating to land registration and the distinction between registered and unregistered land, title to land, settlements of land, trusts of land and co-ownership, the law relating to freehold and leasehold estates in land, licences, easements and profits a prendre, freehold covenants, and the regulation of mortgages.
  • SXL-3210: European Union Law (20)
    The module will provide the student with a comprehensive overview of the political institutions and processes of the European Union and will include The European Court of Justice and its jurisdiction; the sources and general principles of the Law of the European Union, the relationship between the Law of the European Union and National Law. There will be an introduction to the main area of substantive law of the European Union and detailed focus on the law related to the free movement of persons, goods and services.

Semester 2

  • SXL-3111: Land Law
    The module will allow the student to study English and Welsh land law, including the nature of land, the development of land law, the law relating to land registration and the distinction between registered and unregistered land, title to land, settlements of land, trusts of land and co-ownership, the law relating to freehold and leasehold estates in land, licences, easements and profits a prendre, freehold covenants, and the regulation of mortgages.
  • SXL-3212: Tort (20)
    The module will allow the student to study the modern English law of torts, in particular the law relating to: negligence, nuisance, liability for psychiatric injury, occupiers liability, product liability, trespass to the person, defamation and other major torts to allow the students to apply the general principles and defences.

Optional Modules

60 credits from:

  • SXL-3026: Forensic Linguistics in Court (10) (Semester 1)
  • SXL-3113: Dissertation (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    The module will provide students with the opportunity to develop their research skills; an opportunity to develop their skills of written presentation; and an opportunity to research a topic in more depth than is otherwise possible during their undergraduate studies.
  • SXL-3120: Administrative Justice (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    This course will examine core issues in the history, theory and contemporary legal doctrines of English and Welsh administrative law. In particular it will examine the intricacies of key conceptual arguments supporting certain grounds of judicial review and the relative constitutional and institutional competency of certain public bodies. It will differentiate between English and the developing Welsh administrative law where appropriate. The module examines the foundations of judicial review of public body actions and decisions, and the development of the central grounds of judicial review from the late 19th Century to the present day. Students will examine the place of judicial review in a constitutional democracy and draw comparisons with the administrative law systems of other common law countries. Specific reference will be paid to the importance of human rights review in administrative law, special procedures for accessing judicial review, and the mechanisms of dispute resolution, namely the Administrative Court, relevant tribunals and ombudsmen.
  • SXL-3121: Company Law (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    The module will allow the student to study the modern English company law and partnership law, in particular the law relating to the registered company, corporate personality, corporate governance, small business and groups of companies, investor protection and liquidation. The module will also adopt an international perspective in that students will be required to undertake some comparative research.
  • SXL-3125: Evidence (20) (Semester 2)
    The module will allow the student to study the modern English and Welsh law of evidence, including the law relating to: the burden and standard of proof, hearsay, confessions and the right to silence, corroboration, competence and compellability, identification evidence, opinion evidence, evidence of character, and similar fact evidence.
  • SXL-3126: Family & Welfare Law (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    The module will allow the student to study modern English and Welsh family and welfare law, in particular the law relating to adult relationships and family property, the relationship between children and adults, the resolution of disputes concerning children, the protection of children and the law of adoption, legal responses to domestic violence, and the law relating to homelessness and the protection of elderly and vulnerable adults.
  • SXL-3127: Jurisprudence (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    This course examines key issues in jurisprudence and legal philosophy such as legal positivism and natural law, the relationship of law and morals, theories of justice and rights and the nature of the good life. Students will critically examine selected legal philosophies with reference to key current concerns such as the relationship between different branches of the State, domestic and international political issues including terrorism and security, the right to privacy and the rule of law principle. Students will be expected to address these issues with respect to standard and more advanced jurisprudential theories and concepts and to develop a critical personal opinion based on assessment of the theories examined during this course.
  • SXL-3128: Employment Law (20) (Semester 1)
    The module provides a historical outline and an evaluation of the rules of the various institutions involved. The substantive content includes contract formation, equality rights, family friendly policies, employment protection, collective action, and comparative analysis.
  • SXL-3135: Legal Research Jurisprudence (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    This course examines key issues in jurisprudence and legal philosophy such as legal positivism and natural law, the relationship of law and morals, theories of justice and rights and the nature of the good life. Students will critically examine selected legal philosophies with reference to key current concerns such as the relationship between different branches of the State, domestic and international political issues including terrorism and security, the right to privacy and the rule of law principle.
  • SCL-3141: Y Gyfraith ar Waith (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
  • SXL-3144: International Human Rights Law (10) (Semester 2)
  • SXL-3145: Public International Law (10) (Semester 1)
  • SXL-3148: Expert Evidence in Court (10) (Semester 2)
  • SXL-3149: Medical Law and Ethics (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
  • SXL-3150: Commercial Law (20) (Semester 1)
  • SXL-3151: Startup Law (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    This module addresses the need of students wishing to move into legal practice of having an experiential contact with situations inspired in reality through a made up scenario. Students will be put in the position of having to help a tech-based startup go through different legal issues it faces. Before the week seminar the students will have a lecture to introduce them to the key points on the legal area being discussed that week. Each of the seminars will be roughly focused on a discussion around a specific area of law but as the module progresses the decisions taken in earlier seminars inform the content of the following ones. For instance, the decisions on what company type is the most adequate are going to have consequences on the commercial law and tax law sessions. For example, on Seminar 1, students will be explained what is expected from them and the scenario will be set. Their preparation for seminar two will entail finding out if a certain name can be registered as a trademark and what its cost and process. They will also need to find out how a company can be incorporated and the costs involved. The outcome of Seminar 1 will then feed into Seminar 2 (dedicated to company law) where the students will have to think about what content should be included in the articles of incorporation and draft a founder’s agreement. The remaining seminars will follow the same structure of short “fact finding” homework feeding into the next seminar. Tentatively, the remaining seminars will be focused on commercial law, intellectual property, taxation, raising finance, negotiation, employment law and e-commerce, consumer protection and data protection.
  • SXL-3432: Intro to EU Public Procurement (10) (Semester 1)
    The main areas to be studied include: • Introduction to Public Procurement and EU Procurement Policy. • Procurement under the EU Treaty: objectives and the application of Treaty principles to public procurement: o free movement o equal treatment o transparency and o proportionality • European Union Procurement Directives o evolution of procedural rules on Public Procurement; o the rules on coverage (public sector and utilities) and types of contracts; o the tendering procedures and methods; o the procurement process including specification, advertisement, qualification, invitation to tender and evaluation; o the standstill requirements; o debrief and contract award; o the remedies regime. • Public Procurement in the United Kingdom o evolution of the regime, implication of devolution on the UK public procurement framework; o the key rules on advertisement, pre-qualification, invitation to tender and evaluations, standstill, debriefing and contract award and contract award); o the remedies regime • Community and national initiatives on public procurement, such as the framework on Collaborative Procurement Agenda, Efficiency reforms, Shared Services, and Transparency in Public Procurement; • Special issues – Concession contracts, defence procurement, SMEs, Third Sector organisations
  • SXL-3436: Intro to Interna'l Procurement (10) (Semester 2)
    The “International Procurement Regimes” module involves the study of the main principles, main rules and the functioning of UNCITRAL Model Law on Procurement, the Agreement on Government Procurement (GPA) of the WTO and the procurement rules of selected international finance institutions, all of which have impacted on legal principles in national procurement regimes. Students will gain an appreciation of the main features of international procurement regimes and will be provided with an examination of interesting aspects of the legal regimes, through an integrated study of focusing on the political and economic contexts of the rules and important contemporary developments. Specifically the course of study will involve examination of: 1. The objectives and rationales for regulating procurement 2. The United Nations Model Law on Procurement of Goods, Construction and Services - a model procurement framework? 3. The WTO Agreement on Government Procurement. 4. Regulation of procurement in international finance institutions. 5. Recent regulatory reforms in Public Procurement – examination of experiences from selected countries
  • Students directly entering year 3 of the LLB Law degree must take SXL3311 Equity and Trusts and SXL3143 Criminal Law in order to graduate with a qualifying law degree.