Modules for course M1MB | LLB/LWCR1
LLB Law with Criminology (4 yr with Incorporated Foundation)

These are the modules currently offered on this course in the 2019–20 academic year.

You can also view the modules offered in the years: 2018–19.

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Year 0 Modules

Year 1 Modules

Compulsory Modules

Semester 1

  • SXY-1007: Intro to Criminal Justice (20)
    Part One of this module is intended to provide Level One students with a sound understanding of the ways in which in England and Wales, crime comes to the attention of the authorities, how crime is measured and investigated, how accused persons are brought to trial, and those who are convicted are sentenced and punished. This module takes an historical view of criminal law, the police, the criminal courts and the prision system, examining the significant social, economic, and philosophical changes that have helped to shape the modern criminal justice and penal systems. It examines the functions of the criminal justice agencies, explores some of the predominant ideas and theories about how the system operates and raises critical questions about the ways in which criminal justice is done and punishment is delivered. In Part Two the aim is to provide students with a thorough familiarity of major ways of thinking about crime, with reference to some of the main theoretical perspectives within criminology. This module provides an introduction to a range of criminological thought. Theoretical perspectives have been developed in an attempt to explain why people commit crime, and the history of thought on this question will be examined. The module considers the shifting definitions of crime and to offenders. Empirical concerns are likely to include to role of the media in crime construction, the use and abuse of drugs, the experiences of victims of crime and attitudes towards white-collar and organised crime.
    or
    SCY-1002: Cyflwyniad i Gyf Troseddol (20)
    Cyflwyniad i'r modd yr ymchwilir i drosedd yn Lloegr a Chymru, triniaeth y sawl sydd wedi eu cyhuddo ac ar brawf, yr euogfarnedig a systemau cosb. Edrychir yn hanesyddol ar wreiddiau cyfraith troseddol, llysoedd a'r carchar ynghyd â sut mae newid economaidd, athronyddol a chymdeithasol wedi siapio'r system gyfiawnder a chosb. Trafodir swyddogaethau'r asiantaethau cyfiawnder troseddol, prif syniadau a theoriau ar weithredu'r systemau, a chwestiynir yn feirnadol y modd y trosglwyddir cyfiawnder a chosb.
  • SXL-1110: Public Law (20)
    The module comprises two distinct areas of law: constitutional law and administrative law. In addition, it provides students with an introduction to human rights law and the key provisions of the Human Rights Act 1998. Lectures on constitutional law include the sources of constitutional law, constitutional doctrines, the institutions of the Constitution and the influence of human rights law and EU Law on the Constitution. The section of the course devoted to administrative law provides an introduction to this area of law and focuses on the role of the judiciary and the workings of judicial review.
  • SXL-1112: Contract Law (20)
    The module will provide the student with the foundations governing the formation and enforceability of contracts (promise, acceptance and agreement), areas of capacity, intention, legality and certainty of terms. The module includes the remedies available to the parties to a contract and the doctrine of privity of contract. The module will also cover an outline of the law of restitution.
  • SXL-1113: Legal System England & Wales (20)
    The module introduces the student to the English Legal System, providing a framework to study what is Law, how the system operates and the system in a social context. The module examines the court structure, both civil and criminal, the judiciary, lawyers and the role and significance of lay participation in the system (magistrates, juries and tribunal members) and the development of Human Rights Law. Where relevant, comparisons will be drawn to the Welsh body of law that is emerging from the devolved administration. Students will be encouraged to develop a critical analysis of the system as it moves into the 21st century, in comparison with other countries and with attention to its history.
  • SXL-1115: Legal Skills (20)
    The module introduces the student to practical legal study skills such as: effective note-taking, legal essay writing, legal problem solving, presenting an argument, mooting, team working, effective time management, revision techniques etc. Students will be guided in effective application of these skills to researching the law (using the law library, on-line sources, finding legislation, finding cases etc.), reading the law (reading legislation, reading law reports, reading academic legal literature etc.), constructing oral argument and defending legal argument, and analysing and evaluating the law.

Semester 2

  • SXY-1005: Introduction to Criminology (20)
    This module is intended to provide Level One students with a thorough familiarity with the major ways of thinking about crime, with reference to some of the main theoretical perspectives within criminology. This module provides an introduction to criminological thought, ranging from classical to strain theories of crime. Theoretical perspectives have been developed in an attempt to explain why people commit crime, and the history of thought on this question will be examined. The module considers the shifting definitions of crime over time and space, and explores the ways in which society responds to crime and criminals. Empirical concerns are likely to include the role of the media in crime construction, the use and abuse of drugs, the experiences of victims of crime and attitudes towards white-collar and organised crime.
    or
    SCY-1004: Cyflwyniad i Droseddeg (20)
    Mae'r fodiwl yn eich cyflwyno at faes trosedd a chyfiawnder troseddol. Trafodir theorïau a themau allweddol a ddefnyddir i egluro ymddygiad droseddol sy'n cynnwys esboniadau clasurol i'r rhai mwyaf cyfoes; y mesurau a ddatblygwyd i atal trosedd, ynghyd â gorolwg o'r system gyfiawnder troseddol sy'n cynnwys prif asiantaethau cyfiawnder troseddol, datblygiad hanesyddol, strwythur ac atebolrwydd y system.
  • SXL-1110: Public Law
    The module comprises two distinct areas of law: constitutional law and administrative law. In addition, it provides students with an introduction to human rights law and the key provisions of the Human Rights Act 1998. Lectures on constitutional law include the sources of constitutional law, constitutional doctrines, the institutions of the Constitution and the influence of human rights law and EU Law on the Constitution. The section of the course devoted to administrative law provides an introduction to this area of law and focuses on the role of the judiciary and the workings of judicial review.
  • SXL-1112: Contract Law
    The module will provide the student with the foundations governing the formation and enforceability of contracts (promise, acceptance and agreement), areas of capacity, intention, legality and certainty of terms. The module includes the remedies available to the parties to a contract and the doctrine of privity of contract. The module will also cover an outline of the law of restitution.
  • SXL-1113: Legal System England & Wales
    The module introduces the student to the English Legal System, providing a framework to study what is Law, how the system operates and the system in a social context. The module examines the court structure, both civil and criminal, the judiciary, lawyers and the role and significance of lay participation in the system (magistrates, juries and tribunal members) and the development of Human Rights Law. Where relevant, comparisons will be drawn to the Welsh body of law that is emerging from the devolved administration. Students will be encouraged to develop a critical analysis of the system as it moves into the 21st century, in comparison with other countries and with attention to its history.
  • SXL-1115: Legal Skills
    The module introduces the student to practical legal study skills such as: effective note-taking, legal essay writing, legal problem solving, presenting an argument, mooting, team working, effective time management, revision techniques etc. Students will be guided in effective application of these skills to researching the law (using the law library, on-line sources, finding legislation, finding cases etc.), reading the law (reading legislation, reading law reports, reading academic legal literature etc.), constructing oral argument and defending legal argument, and analysing and evaluating the law.

Year 2 Modules

Compulsory Modules

Semester 1

  • SXY-2001: Criminological Theory (20)
    SXY2001 is a 20-credit module, taught over the course of a single semester. It focuses on the main theoretical approaches and ideas in the contemporary study of crime, deviance and social control. The time period runs from the late 18 hundreds to the present day. The approaches and ideas are situated in their intellectual and historical contexts, and the writings of key thinkers will be critically examined. The chief purpose of the module is to show the relevance of criminological ideas to a range of current crime/criminal justice issues. Among the perspectives and topics covered are the following: Merton’s theory of anomie; subcultural theory; neutralization and disengagement techniques; symbolic interactionism; labelling and stigma; moral crusade; critical criminology; shaming; rational choice theory; and crime and the emotions.
  • SXL-2110: European Union Law (20)
    The module will provide the student with a comprehensive overview of the political institutions and processes of the European Union and will include the European Court of Justice and its jurisdiction; the sources and general principles of the Law of the European Union; the relationship between the Law of the European Union and National Law. There will also be an introduction to the main area of substantive law of the European Union.
  • SXL-2112: Tort (20)
    The module will allow the student to study the modern English law of torts, in particular the law relating to: negligence, nuisance, liability for psychiatric injury, occupiers liability, product liability, trespass to the person, defamation and other major torts to allow the students to apply the general principles and defences.
  • SXL-2113: Criminal Law (20)
    The module will allow the student to study the modern English criminal law, in particular the law relating to: Introduction; Actus Reus; Mens Rea; Negligence and Strict Liability; General Defences; Parties to Crime; Inchoate Offences; Homicide; Non-fatal Offences against the Person; Offences under the Theft Acts 1968 and 1978: Theft and Related Offences; Offences involving Deception; Further Offences under the Theft Act; Criminal Damage; Sexual Offences.
  • SXL-2211: Equity and Trusts (20)
    The module will allow the student to study the relationship between Equity and Common Law and cover areas of trusts as used for family or commercial or for public charitable purposes. A study will be made of express, resulting and constructive trusts of property, trustees powers and obligations and the nature and scope of fiduciary obligations. The student will be able to identify the nature and scope of equitable rights and equitable remedies including tracing, freezing injunctions, search orders, specific performance, imposition of personal liability to account as constructive trustee, estoppel entitlements to property or compensation and the developing principle of unconscionability.

Semester 2

  • SXY-2002: Crime & Justice in Mod Britain (20)
    This module aims to build on the introduction to the criminal justice system in England and Wales provided in Year 1 through SXY1007. It will reinforce and advance students' understanding of various measures of crime, and how the main criminal justice agencies operate in particular circumstances and under the demands of increasing international concerns about certain types of crime. Thus, the role, responsibilities and levels of accountability of the main criminal justice agencies will be reviewed in the context of contemporary concerns about specific types of crimes and criminals, such as youth crime, terrorism and state crime, white collar, cyber and organised crime. The module will focus on advancing the discussion of the most dominant debates in criminal justice and penology. In doing so the module aims to advance students’ understanding of criminal justice statistics as well as the value of comparative analysis of criminal justice practices and procedures. Indicative Course content: - Understanding crime and criminal justice by numbers – breaking the back of crime statistics - Controlling youth crime - Controlling ‘clean’ crime – cyber-crime, business crime and white collar crime - Controlling ‘terror’ – state crime, organised crime and terrorism Underpinning these different topics will be an engagement with concepts of social harm and how criminal justice agencies are adapting to control the different types of crimes and criminals, nationally as well as internationally.
    or
    SCY-2003: Trosedd a Chyfiawnder (20)
  • SXL-2112: Tort
    The module will allow the student to study the modern English law of torts, in particular the law relating to: negligence, nuisance, liability for psychiatric injury, occupiers liability, product liability, trespass to the person, defamation and other major torts to allow the students to apply the general principles and defences.
  • SXL-2113: Criminal Law
    The module will allow the student to study the modern English criminal law, in particular the law relating to: Introduction; Actus Reus; Mens Rea; Negligence and Strict Liability; General Defences; Parties to Crime; Inchoate Offences; Homicide; Non-fatal Offences against the Person; Offences under the Theft Acts 1968 and 1978: Theft and Related Offences; Offences involving Deception; Further Offences under the Theft Act; Criminal Damage; Sexual Offences.
  • SXL-2211: Equity and Trusts
    The module will allow the student to study the relationship between Equity and Common Law and cover areas of trusts as used for family or commercial or for public charitable purposes. A study will be made of express, resulting and constructive trusts of property, trustees powers and obligations and the nature and scope of fiduciary obligations. The student will be able to identify the nature and scope of equitable rights and equitable remedies including tracing, freezing injunctions, search orders, specific performance, imposition of personal liability to account as constructive trustee, estoppel entitlements to property or compensation and the developing principle of unconscionability.

Year 3 Modules

Compulsory Modules

Semester 1

  • SXL-3111: Land Law (20)
    The module will allow the student to study English and Welsh land law, including the nature of land, the development of land law, the law relating to land registration and the distinction between registered and unregistered land, title to land, settlements of land, trusts of land and co-ownership, the law relating to freehold and leasehold estates in land, licences, easements and profits a prendre, freehold covenants, and the regulation of mortgages.
  • SXL-3121: Company Law (20)
    The module will allow the student to study the modern English company law and partnership law, in particular the law relating to the registered company, corporate personality, corporate governance, small business and groups of companies, investor protection and liquidation. The module will also adopt an international perspective in that students will be required to undertake some comparative research.

Semester 2

  • SXL-3111: Land Law
    The module will allow the student to study English and Welsh land law, including the nature of land, the development of land law, the law relating to land registration and the distinction between registered and unregistered land, title to land, settlements of land, trusts of land and co-ownership, the law relating to freehold and leasehold estates in land, licences, easements and profits a prendre, freehold covenants, and the regulation of mortgages.
  • SXL-3121: Company Law
    The module will allow the student to study the modern English company law and partnership law, in particular the law relating to the registered company, corporate personality, corporate governance, small business and groups of companies, investor protection and liquidation. The module will also adopt an international perspective in that students will be required to undertake some comparative research.

Optional Modules

40 credits from:

  • SXL-3026: Forensic Linguistics in Court (10) (Semester 1)
  • SXL-3110: Int. Law & Contemporary Issues (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    The aim of this module is to enhance students’ understanding about human rights in an international context. Students will begin with the building blocks, starting with some of the fundamental principles of Public International Law which are required learning for all students of International Human Rights Law. These will include the nature of international law and how it relates to domestic legal systems, international legal personality including Statehood and the human person in the international system, sources of international law including treaty law, and the law of responsibility. On grasping these core principles students will be well placed to move forward to more sophisticated examination of international human rights law. Students will examine the leading philosophical and political debates about the nature of the human person in the international system. They will assess the evolution and significance of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and the sea change that it inspired in regard to the rights of the human person internationally and domestically. Students will study mechanisms for the resolution of human rights disputes, such as the United Nations, international courts and tribunals and domestic bodies. This course will situate the study of the international law pertaining to human rights in the context of broader current affairs and will address leading recent cases and international legal and political controversies that impact upon the most basic fundamental rights of human beings.
  • SXL-3113: Dissertation (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    The module will provide students with the opportunity to develop their research skills; an opportunity to develop their skills of written presentation; and an opportunity to research a topic in more depth than is otherwise possible during their undergraduate studies.
  • SXL-3125: Evidence (20) (Semester 2)
    The module will allow the student to study the modern English and Welsh law of evidence, including the law relating to: the burden and standard of proof, hearsay, confessions and the right to silence, corroboration, competence and compellability, identification evidence, opinion evidence, evidence of character, and similar fact evidence.
  • SXL-3126: Family & Welfare Law (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    The module will allow the student to study modern English and Welsh family and welfare law, in particular the law relating to adult relationships and family property, the relationship between children and adults, the resolution of disputes concerning children, the protection of children and the law of adoption, legal responses to domestic violence, and the law relating to homelessness and the protection of elderly and vulnerable adults.
  • SXL-3127: Jurisprudence (20) (Semester 2)
    This course examines key issues in jurisprudence and legal philosophy such as legal positivism and natural law, the relationship of law and morals, theories of justice and rights and the nature of the good life. Students will critically examine selected legal philosophies with reference to key current concerns such as the relationship between different branches of the State, domestic and international political issues including terrorism and security, the right to privacy and the rule of law principle. Students will be expected to address these issues with respect to standard and more advanced jurisprudential theories and concepts and to develop a critical personal opinion based on assessment of the theories examined during this course.
  • SXL-3128: Employment Law (20) (Semester 1)
    The module provides a historical outline and an evaluation of the rules of the various institutions involved. The substantive content includes contract formation, equality rights, family friendly policies, employment protection, collective action, and comparative analysis.
  • SXL-3130: Media Law (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    The module will allow the student to study modern English & Welsh and some aspects of European Union media law in the context of the operation of the modern media, in particular the law relating to issues such as freedom of the press, defamation, contempt of court, protection of journalists’ sources, freedom of information and privacy. It will also examine the legal regulation of broadcasting in the UK and Europe, with particular attention to licensing, freedom of transmission and reception of programmes, broadcasting standards, the role of the Office of Communications (OFCOM) and European Union broadcasting policy and the impact of the EU Audio-Visual Media Services Directive.
  • SXL-3135: Legal Research Jurisprudence (20) (Semester 2)
    This course examines key issues in jurisprudence and legal philosophy such as legal positivism and natural law, the relationship of law and morals, theories of justice and rights and the nature of the good life. Students will critically examine selected legal philosophies with reference to key current concerns such as the relationship between different branches of the State, domestic and international political issues including terrorism and security, the right to privacy and the rule of law principle.
  • SXL-3136: Intellectual Property Law (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    The course will consist of a historical overview of the development of intellectual property law in the UK, at European Union level and internationally. It will examine the law of copyright in relation to literary, musical, dramatic and artistic works as well as in broadcasts, films and sound recordings. It will also examine performers’ rights in their performances. It will also examine the law of trade secrets, patent law, the registration and protection of designs and trade marks and the common law tort of passing-off. In each of the areas, the scope of protection will be examined, the rights conferred on the holders of the rights, dealings in the rights and remedies, both civil and criminal, against infringers of rights
  • SCL-3141: Y Gyfraith ar Waith (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
  • SXL-3142: International Law of the Sea (20) (Semester 2)
    The International Law of the Sea module will cover a myriad of emerging uses of the sea and the legal problems that these bring to the international forum. The module also touches on aspects of maritime law, international law, and environmental law. The module commences with a brief introduction, and the history and development of the law of the sea before moving on to focus on the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea 1982 (LOSC). The first part of the module looks at each maritime zone in detail as laid out by LOSC, before moving on to examine regulatory issues in part two, such as: • Whaling • Environmental disasters and the protection of the marine environment • Underwater cultural heritage and the salvage of historic shipwrecks • Fisheries and illegal fishing practices • Piracy • Proliferation of WMDs and arms at sea • Marine scientific research and the mining of resources • Settlement of disputes
  • SXL-3148: Expert Evidence in Court (10) (Semester 2)
  • SXL-3150: Commercial Law (20) (Semester 2)
  • SXL-3153: Canadian Constitutional Law (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
  • SXL-3432: Intro to EU Public Procurement (10) (Semester 1)
    The main areas to be studied include: • Introduction to Public Procurement and EU Procurement Policy. • Procurement under the EU Treaty: objectives and the application of Treaty principles to public procurement: o free movement o equal treatment o transparency and o proportionality • European Union Procurement Directives o evolution of procedural rules on Public Procurement; o the rules on coverage (public sector and utilities) and types of contracts; o the tendering procedures and methods; o the procurement process including specification, advertisement, qualification, invitation to tender and evaluation; o the standstill requirements; o debrief and contract award; o the remedies regime. • Public Procurement in the United Kingdom o evolution of the regime, implication of devolution on the UK public procurement framework; o the key rules on advertisement, pre-qualification, invitation to tender and evaluations, standstill, debriefing and contract award and contract award); o the remedies regime • Community and national initiatives on public procurement, such as the framework on Collaborative Procurement Agenda, Efficiency reforms, Shared Services, and Transparency in Public Procurement; • Special issues – Concession contracts, defence procurement, SMEs, Third Sector organisations
  • SXL-3436: Intro to Interna'l Procurement (10) (Semester 2)
    The “International Procurement Regimes” module involves the study of the main principles, main rules and the functioning of UNCITRAL Model Law on Procurement, the Agreement on Government Procurement (GPA) of the WTO and the procurement rules of selected international finance institutions, all of which have impacted on legal principles in national procurement regimes. Students will gain an appreciation of the main features of international procurement regimes and will be provided with an examination of interesting aspects of the legal regimes, through an integrated study of focusing on the political and economic contexts of the rules and important contemporary developments. Specifically the course of study will involve examination of: 1. The objectives and rationales for regulating procurement 2. The United Nations Model Law on Procurement of Goods, Construction and Services - a model procurement framework? 3. The WTO Agreement on Government Procurement. 4. Regulation of procurement in international finance institutions. 5. Recent regulatory reforms in Public Procurement – examination of experiences from selected countries
  • SXL-3500: Britain and the EU (10) (Semester 1)
  • Students must ensure you have a total of 80 credits in Law modules and 40 credits in the other subject and that you have a balance of credits between semesters (preferably 60 credits in each if possible)

40 credits from:

  • SXY-3007: Policing & Society (20) (Semester 2)
    • Introduction: The nature and functions of policing • Historical developments of modern policing in England and Wales • Police Governance and Accountability • Police Occupational Sub-Cultures • Globalising and Policing • Commodification of policing • Policing different communities • Structures of security – surveillance and architecture • The Future of Policing?
    or
    SCY-3004: Yr Heddlu a Chymdeithas Gyfoes (20) (Semester 1)
    Amcan pennaf y fodiwl yw trafod ein dealltwriaeth o'r heddlu, ac yn ehangach, eu swyddogaeth mewn cymdeithas gyfoes. Yn y blynyddoedd diweddar, mae'r heddlu fel sefydliad wedi profi newid sylweddol a bydd y pwysau gan y Llywodraeth am ddiwygiadau pellach yn parhau. Ystyriwn polisiau ac ymarfer gwaith cyfoes yr heddlu a'r fframwaith statudol y maent yn gweithredu. Trafodir y newid yng nghyd-destun polisi cyfiawnder troseddol:- eu prif swyddogaethau; yr heddlu a'r cyfryngau; atal trosedd a gweithio mewn partneriaeth; datblygiadau mewn polisi cyffuriau; yr heddlu; trefn gyhoeddus ac iawnderau dynol; asesu cyfrifoldeb, ansawdd a pherfformiad; cyfle cyfartal a rheoli i'r dyfodol.
  • SXY-3014: Crime and Punishment (20) (Semester 1)
    SXY3014 is a 20-credit module, taught over the course of a single semester. It focuses on the use or threat of punitive control and violence as a response to serious criminal wrongdoing and perceived security threats. Punitive control refers to the different ways in state or non-state political agents respond coercively to behaviour and people they regard as criminal, deviant, problematic, worrying, threatening, troublesome or undesirable in some way or another. The main emphasis of the course will be on violent punitive control: control that works through inflicting physical harm and destruction on human bodies. Focusing on a number of topical case-studies, the course deals centrally with the moral question of how (if at all) punitive control can be morally justified. What is punitive control and how can it be justified? What is punishment and is it necessarily a good thing? What should be done about - or to - people who commit terrible crimes? Should murderers be maimed or killed? What would be a just punishment for rape? Can torture ever be justified? Is terrorism ever right or morally understandable? When is it right to fight? What is pre-emptive war, and when (if ever) is it necessary? One of the key objectives of the course will be to provide a framework for thinking clearly about these kinds of questions.
  • SXY-3015: Crime & Power (20) (Semester 2)
    State crimes: from ghettos to genocide. How does criminology and criminal justice respond when it is the formal State who offends? How do we define crime, justice and victimisation in this context? Transnational and organised crimes: human trafficking and the international trade in sexual services and illegal substances are examples of crimes which transcend national boundaries. Interpersonal levels of crime and power: examples may include ‘honour’-based violence and coercion; homophobic hate crimes; gender violence in intimate relationships; what happens when the victim becomes the offender as in the case of battered women who kill? How do the law, society and criminal justice system respond to these forms of crime?
  • SXY-3021: Perspectives on Youth Crime (20) (Semester 1)
    Indicative content • Introduction: Youth crime and youth justice – reasons for a separate category • Theoretical perspectives on youth justice • Nature and prevalence of youth crime • Young people as folk devils • Youth justice in a devolved nation • International perspectives on youth justice • Effect of crime control on young people • Youth justice policy – historical and comparative perspectives • The future of youth justice