Modules for course M1R4 | LLB/LS
LLB Law with Spanish

These were the modules for this course in the 2017–18 academic year.

You can also view the modules offered in the years: 2018–19; 2019–20.

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Year 4 Modules

Compulsory Modules

Semester 1

  • LZS-3030: Spanish Language 2 (30) Core
    This 30 credit module running throughout the year promotes appropriate use of style and register in all written and oral work and ensures that students can deal with variations in register and idiomatic expression in a confident and accurate manner. Through exposure to selected texts, complex grammatical structures and audiovisual materials, students acquire reading, writing, aural and oral skills which match the required standard of final year linguists. No set text is given for this language module, although students are highly encouraged to purchase a copy of the following books for self-study: Butt, John and Carmen Benjamin (2011) A New Reference Grammar of Modern Spanish, London and Oxford: Arnold. Pountain, Christopher, Teresa de Carlos and Angela Howkins (2011) Practicing Spanish Grammar: A Workbook, London & Oxford: Arnold. Any other learning resources: Students are given two module dossiers at the beginning of the year containing all the necessary materials for their classes. Students are encouraged to complete the School’s Self-Study Portfolio (available from SMLC website)
    or
    LCS-3030: Iaith Sbaeneg 2 (30) Core
    Nod y modiwl 30 credyd hwn sy'n para trwy'r flwyddyn yw hyrwyddo defnydd priodol o arddull a chywair ym mhob darn o waith ysgrifenedig a sicrhau bod myfyrwyr yn gallu ymdrin ag amrywiadau cywair a mynegiant idiomatig mewn modd hyderus a chywir. Trwy ddarllen testunau amrywiol a gweld strwythurau gramadegol cymhleth, disgwylir i fyfyrwyr feithrin sgiliau darllen ac ysgrifennu sy'n cyfateb i safon myfyrwyr yn eu blwyddyn olaf.
  • SXL-3111: Land Law (20)
    The module will allow the student to study English and Welsh land law, including the nature of land, the development of land law, the law relating to land registration and the distinction between registered and unregistered land, title to land, settlements of land, trusts of land and co-ownership, the law relating to freehold and leasehold estates in land, licences, easements and profits a prendre, freehold covenants, and the regulation of mortgages.
  • SXL-3121: Company Law (20)
    The module will allow the student to study the modern English company law and partnership law, in particular the law relating to the registered company, corporate personality, corporate governance, small business and groups of companies, investor protection and liquidation. The module will also adopt an international perspective in that students will be required to undertake some comparative research.

Semester 2

  • LZS-3030: Spanish Language 2
    This 30 credit module running throughout the year promotes appropriate use of style and register in all written and oral work and ensures that students can deal with variations in register and idiomatic expression in a confident and accurate manner. Through exposure to selected texts, complex grammatical structures and audiovisual materials, students acquire reading, writing, aural and oral skills which match the required standard of final year linguists. No set text is given for this language module, although students are highly encouraged to purchase a copy of the following books for self-study: Butt, John and Carmen Benjamin (2011) A New Reference Grammar of Modern Spanish, London and Oxford: Arnold. Pountain, Christopher, Teresa de Carlos and Angela Howkins (2011) Practicing Spanish Grammar: A Workbook, London & Oxford: Arnold. Any other learning resources: Students are given two module dossiers at the beginning of the year containing all the necessary materials for their classes. Students are encouraged to complete the School’s Self-Study Portfolio (available from SMLC website)
    or
    LCS-3030: Iaith Sbaeneg 2
    Nod y modiwl 30 credyd hwn sy'n para trwy'r flwyddyn yw hyrwyddo defnydd priodol o arddull a chywair ym mhob darn o waith ysgrifenedig a sicrhau bod myfyrwyr yn gallu ymdrin ag amrywiadau cywair a mynegiant idiomatig mewn modd hyderus a chywir. Trwy ddarllen testunau amrywiol a gweld strwythurau gramadegol cymhleth, disgwylir i fyfyrwyr feithrin sgiliau darllen ac ysgrifennu sy'n cyfateb i safon myfyrwyr yn eu blwyddyn olaf.
  • SXL-3111: Land Law
    The module will allow the student to study English and Welsh land law, including the nature of land, the development of land law, the law relating to land registration and the distinction between registered and unregistered land, title to land, settlements of land, trusts of land and co-ownership, the law relating to freehold and leasehold estates in land, licences, easements and profits a prendre, freehold covenants, and the regulation of mortgages.
  • SXL-3121: Company Law
    The module will allow the student to study the modern English company law and partnership law, in particular the law relating to the registered company, corporate personality, corporate governance, small business and groups of companies, investor protection and liquidation. The module will also adopt an international perspective in that students will be required to undertake some comparative research.

Optional Modules

20 to 40 credits from:

  • SXL-3026: Forensic Linguistics in Court (10) (Semester 1)
  • SXL-3113: Dissertation (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    The module will provide students with the opportunity to develop their research skills; an opportunity to develop their skills of written presentation; and an opportunity to research a topic in more depth than is otherwise possible during their undergraduate studies.
  • SXL-3120: Administrative Justice (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    This course will examine core issues in the history, theory and contemporary legal doctrines of English and Welsh administrative law. In particular it will examine the intricacies of key conceptual arguments supporting certain grounds of judicial review and the relative constitutional and institutional competency of certain public bodies. It will differentiate between English and the developing Welsh administrative law where appropriate. The module examines the foundations of judicial review of public body actions and decisions, and the development of the central grounds of judicial review from the late 19th Century to the present day. Students will examine the place of judicial review in a constitutional democracy and draw comparisons with the administrative law systems of other common law countries. Specific reference will be paid to the importance of human rights review in administrative law, special procedures for accessing judicial review, and the mechanisms of dispute resolution, namely the Administrative Court, relevant tribunals and ombudsmen.
  • SXL-3125: Evidence (20) (Semester 2)
    The module will allow the student to study the modern English and Welsh law of evidence, including the law relating to: the burden and standard of proof, hearsay, confessions and the right to silence, corroboration, competence and compellability, identification evidence, opinion evidence, evidence of character, and similar fact evidence.
  • SXL-3126: Family & Welfare Law (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    The module will allow the student to study modern English and Welsh family and welfare law, in particular the law relating to adult relationships and family property, the relationship between children and adults, the resolution of disputes concerning children, the protection of children and the law of adoption, legal responses to domestic violence, and the law relating to homelessness and the protection of elderly and vulnerable adults.
  • SXL-3127: Jurisprudence (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    This course examines key issues in jurisprudence and legal philosophy such as legal positivism and natural law, the relationship of law and morals, theories of justice and rights and the nature of the good life. Students will critically examine selected legal philosophies with reference to key current concerns such as the relationship between different branches of the State, domestic and international political issues including terrorism and security, the right to privacy and the rule of law principle. Students will be expected to address these issues with respect to standard and more advanced jurisprudential theories and concepts and to develop a critical personal opinion based on assessment of the theories examined during this course.
  • SXL-3128: Employment Law (20) (Semester 1)
    The module provides a historical outline and an evaluation of the rules of the various institutions involved. The substantive content includes contract formation, equality rights, family friendly policies, employment protection, collective action, and comparative analysis.
  • SXL-3135: Legal Research Jurisprudence (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    This course examines key issues in jurisprudence and legal philosophy such as legal positivism and natural law, the relationship of law and morals, theories of justice and rights and the nature of the good life. Students will critically examine selected legal philosophies with reference to key current concerns such as the relationship between different branches of the State, domestic and international political issues including terrorism and security, the right to privacy and the rule of law principle.
  • SCL-3141: Y Gyfraith ar Waith (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
  • SXL-3144: International Human Rights Law (10) (Semester 2)
  • SXL-3145: Public International Law (10) (Semester 1)
  • SXL-3148: Expert Evidence in Court (10) (Semester 2)
  • SXL-3149: Medical Law and Ethics (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
  • SXL-3150: Commercial Law (20) (Semester 1)
  • SXL-3151: Startup Law (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    This module addresses the need of students wishing to move into legal practice of having an experiential contact with situations inspired in reality through a made up scenario. Students will be put in the position of having to help a tech-based startup go through different legal issues it faces. Before the week seminar the students will have a lecture to introduce them to the key points on the legal area being discussed that week. Each of the seminars will be roughly focused on a discussion around a specific area of law but as the module progresses the decisions taken in earlier seminars inform the content of the following ones. For instance, the decisions on what company type is the most adequate are going to have consequences on the commercial law and tax law sessions. For example, on Seminar 1, students will be explained what is expected from them and the scenario will be set. Their preparation for seminar two will entail finding out if a certain name can be registered as a trademark and what its cost and process. They will also need to find out how a company can be incorporated and the costs involved. The outcome of Seminar 1 will then feed into Seminar 2 (dedicated to company law) where the students will have to think about what content should be included in the articles of incorporation and draft a founder’s agreement. The remaining seminars will follow the same structure of short “fact finding” homework feeding into the next seminar. Tentatively, the remaining seminars will be focused on commercial law, intellectual property, taxation, raising finance, negotiation, employment law and e-commerce, consumer protection and data protection.
  • SXL-3432: Intro to EU Public Procurement (10) (Semester 1)
    The main areas to be studied include: • Introduction to Public Procurement and EU Procurement Policy. • Procurement under the EU Treaty: objectives and the application of Treaty principles to public procurement: o free movement o equal treatment o transparency and o proportionality • European Union Procurement Directives o evolution of procedural rules on Public Procurement; o the rules on coverage (public sector and utilities) and types of contracts; o the tendering procedures and methods; o the procurement process including specification, advertisement, qualification, invitation to tender and evaluation; o the standstill requirements; o debrief and contract award; o the remedies regime. • Public Procurement in the United Kingdom o evolution of the regime, implication of devolution on the UK public procurement framework; o the key rules on advertisement, pre-qualification, invitation to tender and evaluations, standstill, debriefing and contract award and contract award); o the remedies regime • Community and national initiatives on public procurement, such as the framework on Collaborative Procurement Agenda, Efficiency reforms, Shared Services, and Transparency in Public Procurement; • Special issues – Concession contracts, defence procurement, SMEs, Third Sector organisations
  • SXL-3436: Intro to Interna'l Procurement (10) (Semester 2)
    The “International Procurement Regimes” module involves the study of the main principles, main rules and the functioning of UNCITRAL Model Law on Procurement, the Agreement on Government Procurement (GPA) of the WTO and the procurement rules of selected international finance institutions, all of which have impacted on legal principles in national procurement regimes. Students will gain an appreciation of the main features of international procurement regimes and will be provided with an examination of interesting aspects of the legal regimes, through an integrated study of focusing on the political and economic contexts of the rules and important contemporary developments. Specifically the course of study will involve examination of: 1. The objectives and rationales for regulating procurement 2. The United Nations Model Law on Procurement of Goods, Construction and Services - a model procurement framework? 3. The WTO Agreement on Government Procurement. 4. Regulation of procurement in international finance institutions. 5. Recent regulatory reforms in Public Procurement – examination of experiences from selected countries
  • Students taking Law with another subject choose 20 or 40 credits of optional modules depending on the number of compulsory modules for their degree programme. You need to ensure you have a total of 80 credits in Law modules and 40 credits in the other subject and that you have a balance of credits between semeters (preferably 60 credits in each if possible)

10 credits from: