Modules for course M1V1 | LLB/LH
LLB Law with History

These are the modules currently offered on this course in the 2019–20 academic year.

You can also view the modules offered in the years: 2018–19.

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Year 1 Modules

Compulsory Modules

Semester 1

  • SXL-1110: Public Law (20)
    The module comprises two distinct areas of law: constitutional law and administrative law. In addition, it provides students with an introduction to human rights law and the key provisions of the Human Rights Act 1998. Lectures on constitutional law include the sources of constitutional law, constitutional doctrines, the institutions of the Constitution and the influence of human rights law and EU Law on the Constitution. The section of the course devoted to administrative law provides an introduction to this area of law and focuses on the role of the judiciary and the workings of judicial review.
  • SXL-1112: Contract Law (20)
    The module will provide the student with the foundations governing the formation and enforceability of contracts (promise, acceptance and agreement), areas of capacity, intention, legality and certainty of terms. The module includes the remedies available to the parties to a contract and the doctrine of privity of contract. The module will also cover an outline of the law of restitution.
  • SXL-1113: Legal System England & Wales (20)
    The module introduces the student to the English Legal System, providing a framework to study what is Law, how the system operates and the system in a social context. The module examines the court structure, both civil and criminal, the judiciary, lawyers and the role and significance of lay participation in the system (magistrates, juries and tribunal members) and the development of Human Rights Law. Where relevant, comparisons will be drawn to the Welsh body of law that is emerging from the devolved administration. Students will be encouraged to develop a critical analysis of the system as it moves into the 21st century, in comparison with other countries and with attention to its history.
  • SXL-1115: Legal Skills (20)
    The module introduces the student to practical legal study skills such as: effective note-taking, legal essay writing, legal problem solving, presenting an argument, mooting, team working, effective time management, revision techniques etc. Students will be guided in effective application of these skills to researching the law (using the law library, on-line sources, finding legislation, finding cases etc.), reading the law (reading legislation, reading law reports, reading academic legal literature etc.), constructing oral argument and defending legal argument, and analysing and evaluating the law.

Semester 2

  • SXL-1110: Public Law
    The module comprises two distinct areas of law: constitutional law and administrative law. In addition, it provides students with an introduction to human rights law and the key provisions of the Human Rights Act 1998. Lectures on constitutional law include the sources of constitutional law, constitutional doctrines, the institutions of the Constitution and the influence of human rights law and EU Law on the Constitution. The section of the course devoted to administrative law provides an introduction to this area of law and focuses on the role of the judiciary and the workings of judicial review.
  • SXL-1112: Contract Law
    The module will provide the student with the foundations governing the formation and enforceability of contracts (promise, acceptance and agreement), areas of capacity, intention, legality and certainty of terms. The module includes the remedies available to the parties to a contract and the doctrine of privity of contract. The module will also cover an outline of the law of restitution.
  • SXL-1113: Legal System England & Wales
    The module introduces the student to the English Legal System, providing a framework to study what is Law, how the system operates and the system in a social context. The module examines the court structure, both civil and criminal, the judiciary, lawyers and the role and significance of lay participation in the system (magistrates, juries and tribunal members) and the development of Human Rights Law. Where relevant, comparisons will be drawn to the Welsh body of law that is emerging from the devolved administration. Students will be encouraged to develop a critical analysis of the system as it moves into the 21st century, in comparison with other countries and with attention to its history.
  • SXL-1115: Legal Skills
    The module introduces the student to practical legal study skills such as: effective note-taking, legal essay writing, legal problem solving, presenting an argument, mooting, team working, effective time management, revision techniques etc. Students will be guided in effective application of these skills to researching the law (using the law library, on-line sources, finding legislation, finding cases etc.), reading the law (reading legislation, reading law reports, reading academic legal literature etc.), constructing oral argument and defending legal argument, and analysing and evaluating the law.

Optional Modules

40 credits from:

  • HXH-1002: Birth of Modern Europe (20) (Semester 2)
    The Renaissance; state formation; multiple monarchies (Valois France, the Habsburg Dominions, centre and peripheries in Britain and Ireland); the Reformation in Britain and on the Continent.
    or
    HXC-1003: Genedigaeth yr Ewrop Fodern (20) (Semester 2)
  • HXH-1005: Intro to History and Heritage (20) (Semester 1)
    Definitions of history, heritage and archaeology; the development of museums; cabinets of curiosities; new heritage sites; heritage agencies; the state and heritage management; heritage and landscape conservation; industrial heritage; heritage and identity.
  • HPS-1006: Ess. Skills for Ac. Success (20) (Semester 1) or
    HAC-1006: Ess. Skills for Ac. Success (20) (Semester 1)
  • HXW-1007: Wales: Princes to Tudors (20) (Semester 2)
    Wales in the age of Owain Gwynedd and Lord Rhys; Gerald of Wales; rise of Llywelyn ap Iorwerth in Gwynedd and over much of the rest of Wales; the reign of Dafydd ap Llywelyn and succession to Gwynedd; the hegemony and downfall of Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, prince of Wales; poetry and history writing in medieval Wales; Welsh political aspirations in l4th century; Owain Glyndŵr and his movement; Brutus, 1485 and political prophecy; Wales and the Reformation; Wales and the Renaissance; Wales and 16th-century politics – the Acts of Union.
    or
    HXC-1007: Cymru: Tywysogion i Duduriaid (20) (Semester 2)
    Oes Owain Gwynedd a'r Arglwydd Rhys; Gerallt Gymro; Llywelyn ap Iorwerth (m. 1240) a'i feibion; Penarglwyddiaeth a chwymp Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, Tywysog Cymru (m. 1282); barddoniaeth a hanes yn yr Oesoedd Canol; dyheadau gwleidyddol Cymreig yn y bedwaredd ganrif ar ddeg; mudiad Glyndwr; Brutus, 1485 a'r traddodiad proffwydol; Cymru a'r Diwygiad Protestannaidd; Cymru a'r Dadeni; Cymru a gwleidyddiaeth yr unfed ganrif ar bymtheg - y Deddfau Uno.
  • HXW-1010: Wales since 1789 (20) (Semester 1) or
    HXC-1006: Cymru yn y Byd Modern (20) (Semester 1)
    Wythnos 1: Darlith: Deall Cymru fodern ac amcanion y modiwl Dim seminar Wythnos 2: Darlith: Meithrin Cymru fodern (i): Diwydiant ac economi Seminar: Siartiaeth a Beca Wythnos 3: Darlith: Meithrin Cymru fodern (ii): Trosedd, cosb a moesoldeb Seminar: Y Gymru fywgraffiadol: David Lloyd George fel astudiaeth achos Wythnos 4: Darlith: Themâu (i): Mewnfudo ac allfudo Seminar: Mewnfudo Wythnos 5: Darlith: Themâu (ii): Iaith, addysg a chrefydd yn y 19eg ganrif Seminar: Cenedlaetholdeb, Tynged yr Iaith Wythnos 6: Darlith: Themâu (iii): Effaith y ddau ryfel byd Seminar: Y Gymru Lafurol Gweithdy: Eidalwyr yng Nghymru Wythnos 7: WYTHNOS DDARLLEN Wythnos 8: Darlith: Themâu (iv): Merched a llunio Cymru fodern Seminar: Cerddoriaeth boblogaidd Wythnos 9: Darlith: Themâu (v): Diwylliant poblogaidd a newid cymdeithasol Seminar: Merched mewn llenyddiaeth Gymreig Wythnos 10: Darlith: Themâu (vi): Chwaraeon a hunaniaeth Seminar: Hunaniaeth Wythnos 11: Darlith: Materion (i): Y frwydr am hunan-reolaeth Seminar: Y Cwestiwn Cenedlaethol Wythnos 12: Darlith: Materion (ii): Creu Cymru newydd? Seminar: Sesiwn adolygu
  • HXH-1011: Europe in the High Middle Ages (20) (Semester 1) or
    HXC-1011: Ewrop yn y Canol Oesoedd Uchel (20) (Semester 1)
  • HXH-1012: Modern Politics in Action (20) (Semester 2) or
    HXC-1012: GweithreduGwleidyddiaethFodern (20) (Semester 2)
  • Students on this degree must take 20 credits in semester 2

Year 2 Modules

Compulsory Modules

Semester 1

  • HCH-2050: Debating History (20)
    The first part of the course is concerned with the use of the past made by historians and commentators such as politicians, the way traditions are invented (and destroyed), and introduces the different historiographical schools. The second part covers some historiographical (ie. concerned with the art of writing history) issues with emphasis on the various ideas about the study and writing of history which have developed over the last two centuries and which students need to understand in order to engage confidently with the different approaches which professional historians take to their work. This is taught through a case-study approach where students can apply the different approaches studied in the first part of the course to specific controversial historical subjects. The course will cover the following topics: Whig and Tory history, Ranke, the professionalisation of the study of history, nations, empire, structuralism, post-structuralism, revisionism, counter-factual history, case studies may change from year to year but will include topics such as The Peasants’ Revolt, The English civil war, the outbreak of world war one; suffrage, consumerism, the Welsh in history, the Reformation. American Civil war, Cold War; Oral history; National identity.
    or
    HCG-2011: Dehongli'r Gorffennol (20)
    Er y byddir yn rhoi peth sylw i rai o haneswyr mawr y bedwaredd ganrif ar bymtheg – fel Ranke, Macaulay a Marx – bydd pwyslais y cwrs ar hanesyddiaeth yr ugeinfed ganrif. Canolbwyntir gan hynny ar feddylwyr a thueddiadau allweddol ym maes hanesyddiaeth yn ystod y ganrif ddiwethaf gan astudio enghreifftiau penodol o gynnyrch y meddylwyr a’r ysgolion dan sylw. Ymysg y pynciau a astudir bydd Ysgol yr Annales, Hanesyddiaeth Farcsaidd, Hanes Merched, Hanes Llafar, a her syniadaeth ôl-strwythurol ac ôl-fodern. Neulltuir yn ogystal ddwy ddarlith i drafod agweddau ar Hanesyddiaeth Cymru yn y cyfnod diweddar.
  • SXL-2110: European Union Law (20)
    The module will provide the student with a comprehensive overview of the political institutions and processes of the European Union and will include the European Court of Justice and its jurisdiction; the sources and general principles of the Law of the European Union; the relationship between the Law of the European Union and National Law. There will also be an introduction to the main area of substantive law of the European Union.
  • SXL-2112: Tort (20)
    The module will allow the student to study the modern English law of torts, in particular the law relating to: negligence, nuisance, liability for psychiatric injury, occupiers liability, product liability, trespass to the person, defamation and other major torts to allow the students to apply the general principles and defences.
  • SXL-2113: Criminal Law (20)
    The module will allow the student to study the modern English criminal law, in particular the law relating to: Introduction; Actus Reus; Mens Rea; Negligence and Strict Liability; General Defences; Parties to Crime; Inchoate Offences; Homicide; Non-fatal Offences against the Person; Offences under the Theft Acts 1968 and 1978: Theft and Related Offences; Offences involving Deception; Further Offences under the Theft Act; Criminal Damage; Sexual Offences.
  • SXL-2211: Equity and Trusts (20)
    The module will allow the student to study the relationship between Equity and Common Law and cover areas of trusts as used for family or commercial or for public charitable purposes. A study will be made of express, resulting and constructive trusts of property, trustees powers and obligations and the nature and scope of fiduciary obligations. The student will be able to identify the nature and scope of equitable rights and equitable remedies including tracing, freezing injunctions, search orders, specific performance, imposition of personal liability to account as constructive trustee, estoppel entitlements to property or compensation and the developing principle of unconscionability.

Semester 2

  • SXL-2112: Tort
    The module will allow the student to study the modern English law of torts, in particular the law relating to: negligence, nuisance, liability for psychiatric injury, occupiers liability, product liability, trespass to the person, defamation and other major torts to allow the students to apply the general principles and defences.
  • SXL-2113: Criminal Law
    The module will allow the student to study the modern English criminal law, in particular the law relating to: Introduction; Actus Reus; Mens Rea; Negligence and Strict Liability; General Defences; Parties to Crime; Inchoate Offences; Homicide; Non-fatal Offences against the Person; Offences under the Theft Acts 1968 and 1978: Theft and Related Offences; Offences involving Deception; Further Offences under the Theft Act; Criminal Damage; Sexual Offences.
  • SXL-2211: Equity and Trusts
    The module will allow the student to study the relationship between Equity and Common Law and cover areas of trusts as used for family or commercial or for public charitable purposes. A study will be made of express, resulting and constructive trusts of property, trustees powers and obligations and the nature and scope of fiduciary obligations. The student will be able to identify the nature and scope of equitable rights and equitable remedies including tracing, freezing injunctions, search orders, specific performance, imposition of personal liability to account as constructive trustee, estoppel entitlements to property or compensation and the developing principle of unconscionability.

Optional Modules

20 credits from:

  • HGH-2112: Civil War: Eng & Wal 1558-1660 (20) (Semester 2)
    The course concentrates upon political and religious history - but social, cultural, economic and intellectual aspects are also considered where they are relevant to the core of the course. Major topics explored include: The ‘crisis’ of the 1590s; The impact of the arrival of the Stuart dynasty; Divisions in English Protestantism; Charles I’s Personal Rule, and the outbreak of civil war; The course of the conflict, and attempts at a settlement; The reasons for the regicide; The English Republic and the restoration, 1649-1660
  • HGH-2118: The United States, 1877-1945 (20) (Semester 1)
    This course module is designed to provide a general but comprehensive introduction to the major themes and events of American History from 1877-1945. Topics covered include: Progressivism; the 'Incorporation' of America and the rise of big business; immigration and migration; the birth of American foreign policy; the First World War; America in the 1920s; the Stock Market Crash and the Great Depression; Pearl Harbour and the Second World War.
  • HTH-2124: Heritage and Identity (20) (Semester 2)
    Individual, group, local, regional, national and global identities; museums; political and cultural role of archaeology and history, the heritage in minority groups, the heritage of elites, oral culture, heritage and the nation state, the creation of heritage-based identities in past societies.
  • HGH-2127: Europe, Early Middle Ages (20) (Semester 1)
    1. The fall of the western Roman empire; 2. The foundation of the `barbarian¿ kingdoms; 3. Merovingians and Carolingians; 4. Charlemagne; 5. The papacy and monasticism; 6. Justinian and the Byzantine revival; 7. Culture and society; 8. Towns and economy; 9. The Vikings and the foundation of Normandy; 10. The birth of Islam and the creation of the caliphate of Cordoba. Students taking the course will study these topics using both primary sources (such as Gregory of Tours, Paul the Deacon, Einhard¿s Life of Charlemagne) and the modern historiography.
  • HGH-2135: Victorian Britain 1837-1901 (20) (Semester 2)
    (1) Victorian values (2) Economy, industry and work (3) Popular culture and leisure (4) Medicine and science (5) Technological developments (6) Poverty and crime (7) Votes for women (8) Eclipse of the elites (9) The British Empire (10) Shadows of war (11) Concluding lecture
  • HGH-2138: Europe 1945-1992 (20) (Semester 1)
  • HTH-2142: Americanisation (20) (Semester 2)
    This module examines American impacts on the rest of the world - in particular Europe - and addresses reactions to these focused by a critical approach to the concepts 'Americanisation' and 'Anti-Americanism'. In particular: . Attraction and resistance: ambivalences of Americanisation . Images and enemy images . The reciprocity of transatlantic cultural transfers . Anti-Americanism as a projection . Anti-Americanism in the inter-war period . Nazi Germany and America . GIs as agents of Americanisation . Americanisation and Sovietisation . Anti-American propaganda in the Cold War . The anti-Americanism of the New Left . Anti-Americanism and Anti-Semitism . Shopping mall, Disneyland and theme park in Europe
  • HTH-2143: The Reign of King Stephen (20) (Semester 2)
    This course offers students the opportunity to study the reign of king Stephen in the period 1135-54. It was, and has remained, controversial. Topics include: the roots of civil war: the reign of Henry I, the origins of civil war, the course of the war and the stalemate in the period1150-54, the role and characters of king Stephen and the Empress Matilda, the role of the barons, the social, economic, political impact of civil war, masculinity, kingship, queenship, women and power, attitudes to war and the role and views of the church.
  • HTH-2149: Britannia Rule the Waves (20) (Semester 1)
    (1) Introduction to the module, British Empire and Imperial Studies (2) Governing the Empire (3) British Policy and Trade (4) Technological Change (5) Scientific Exploration (6) The Empire: Asia (7) The Empire: America (8) The Empire: Africa (9) The Empire: Australasia (10) The British Empire and the Approach of War (11) Concluding lecture
  • HTH-2157: The Age of the Castle (20) (Semester 2)
    This module explores the following themes: 1. Introduction: From the ‘Castle Story’ to Current Thinking; 2. The Origin of the Castle; 3. ‘The King of the Castle’: Great Towers and Keeps; 4. ‘An Englishman’s Home is his Castle’?: The Castle as Lordly Residence; 5. The Castles of the Crusaders 1098-1291; 6. Castles and the Chivalric Ideal; 7. The Castles of Wales 1066-1415; 8. Castles and Elite Landscapes; 9. The Decline of the Castle?; 10. Romantic Ruins? Artists, Poets and the Heritage Industry You will be given an opportunity to focus in-depth on these themes and on the underpinning primary sources in your seminars.
    or
    HTC-2128: Cestyll a Chymdeithas (20) (Semester 2)
    Bydd y modiwl yn edrych ar y themâu canlynol: 1. Cefndir a chyd-destun hanesyddiaethol; 2. Gwreiddiau cestyll y cyfnod; 3. Cestyll a chrefft rhyfela yn y cyfnod; 4. Castell pawb ei dŷ: cestyll fel cartrefi ac anheddau; 5. Astudiaeth achos 1: Cestyll y Croesgadwyr 1098-1291; 6. Cestyll y dychymyg a’r delfryd sifalrig; 7. Astudiaeth achos 2: Cestyll yng Nghymru 1063-1415; 8. Tirlun a phensaernïaeth gastellog; 9. Cestyll a chartrefi caerog yr Oesau Canol Diweddar; 10. Machlud Cestyll yr Oesau Canol? Ceir cyfle yn ystod y seminarau i archwilio’r themâu hyn ymhellach.
  • HTH-2159: History in Practice (20) (Semester 2) or
    HTW-2159: History in Practice (20) (Semester 2)
  • HTH-2163: Nazi Germany 1933-1945 (20) (Semester 1)
  • HTH-2164: Violence in Early Mod Britain (20) (Semester 1)
  • Students taking this degree must take 20 credits of History modules.

Year 3 Modules

Compulsory Modules

Semester 1

  • SXL-3111: Land Law (20)
    The module will allow the student to study English and Welsh land law, including the nature of land, the development of land law, the law relating to land registration and the distinction between registered and unregistered land, title to land, settlements of land, trusts of land and co-ownership, the law relating to freehold and leasehold estates in land, licences, easements and profits a prendre, freehold covenants, and the regulation of mortgages.
  • SXL-3121: Company Law (20)
    The module will allow the student to study the modern English company law and partnership law, in particular the law relating to the registered company, corporate personality, corporate governance, small business and groups of companies, investor protection and liquidation. The module will also adopt an international perspective in that students will be required to undertake some comparative research.

Semester 2

  • SXL-3111: Land Law
    The module will allow the student to study English and Welsh land law, including the nature of land, the development of land law, the law relating to land registration and the distinction between registered and unregistered land, title to land, settlements of land, trusts of land and co-ownership, the law relating to freehold and leasehold estates in land, licences, easements and profits a prendre, freehold covenants, and the regulation of mortgages.
  • SXL-3121: Company Law
    The module will allow the student to study the modern English company law and partnership law, in particular the law relating to the registered company, corporate personality, corporate governance, small business and groups of companies, investor protection and liquidation. The module will also adopt an international perspective in that students will be required to undertake some comparative research.

Optional Modules

40 credits from:

  • SXL-3026: Forensic Linguistics in Court (10) (Semester 1)
  • SXL-3110: Int. Law & Contemporary Issues (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    The aim of this module is to enhance students’ understanding about human rights in an international context. Students will begin with the building blocks, starting with some of the fundamental principles of Public International Law which are required learning for all students of International Human Rights Law. These will include the nature of international law and how it relates to domestic legal systems, international legal personality including Statehood and the human person in the international system, sources of international law including treaty law, and the law of responsibility. On grasping these core principles students will be well placed to move forward to more sophisticated examination of international human rights law. Students will examine the leading philosophical and political debates about the nature of the human person in the international system. They will assess the evolution and significance of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and the sea change that it inspired in regard to the rights of the human person internationally and domestically. Students will study mechanisms for the resolution of human rights disputes, such as the United Nations, international courts and tribunals and domestic bodies. This course will situate the study of the international law pertaining to human rights in the context of broader current affairs and will address leading recent cases and international legal and political controversies that impact upon the most basic fundamental rights of human beings.
  • SXL-3113: Dissertation (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    The module will provide students with the opportunity to develop their research skills; an opportunity to develop their skills of written presentation; and an opportunity to research a topic in more depth than is otherwise possible during their undergraduate studies.
  • SXL-3125: Evidence (20) (Semester 2)
    The module will allow the student to study the modern English and Welsh law of evidence, including the law relating to: the burden and standard of proof, hearsay, confessions and the right to silence, corroboration, competence and compellability, identification evidence, opinion evidence, evidence of character, and similar fact evidence.
  • SXL-3126: Family & Welfare Law (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    The module will allow the student to study modern English and Welsh family and welfare law, in particular the law relating to adult relationships and family property, the relationship between children and adults, the resolution of disputes concerning children, the protection of children and the law of adoption, legal responses to domestic violence, and the law relating to homelessness and the protection of elderly and vulnerable adults.
  • SXL-3127: Jurisprudence (20) (Semester 2)
    This course examines key issues in jurisprudence and legal philosophy such as legal positivism and natural law, the relationship of law and morals, theories of justice and rights and the nature of the good life. Students will critically examine selected legal philosophies with reference to key current concerns such as the relationship between different branches of the State, domestic and international political issues including terrorism and security, the right to privacy and the rule of law principle. Students will be expected to address these issues with respect to standard and more advanced jurisprudential theories and concepts and to develop a critical personal opinion based on assessment of the theories examined during this course.
  • SXL-3128: Employment Law (20) (Semester 1)
    The module provides a historical outline and an evaluation of the rules of the various institutions involved. The substantive content includes contract formation, equality rights, family friendly policies, employment protection, collective action, and comparative analysis.
  • SXL-3130: Media Law (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    The module will allow the student to study modern English & Welsh and some aspects of European Union media law in the context of the operation of the modern media, in particular the law relating to issues such as freedom of the press, defamation, contempt of court, protection of journalists’ sources, freedom of information and privacy. It will also examine the legal regulation of broadcasting in the UK and Europe, with particular attention to licensing, freedom of transmission and reception of programmes, broadcasting standards, the role of the Office of Communications (OFCOM) and European Union broadcasting policy and the impact of the EU Audio-Visual Media Services Directive.
  • SXL-3135: Legal Research Jurisprudence (20) (Semester 2)
    This course examines key issues in jurisprudence and legal philosophy such as legal positivism and natural law, the relationship of law and morals, theories of justice and rights and the nature of the good life. Students will critically examine selected legal philosophies with reference to key current concerns such as the relationship between different branches of the State, domestic and international political issues including terrorism and security, the right to privacy and the rule of law principle.
  • SXL-3136: Intellectual Property Law (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    The course will consist of a historical overview of the development of intellectual property law in the UK, at European Union level and internationally. It will examine the law of copyright in relation to literary, musical, dramatic and artistic works as well as in broadcasts, films and sound recordings. It will also examine performers’ rights in their performances. It will also examine the law of trade secrets, patent law, the registration and protection of designs and trade marks and the common law tort of passing-off. In each of the areas, the scope of protection will be examined, the rights conferred on the holders of the rights, dealings in the rights and remedies, both civil and criminal, against infringers of rights
  • SCL-3141: Y Gyfraith ar Waith (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
  • SXL-3142: International Law of the Sea (20) (Semester 2)
    The International Law of the Sea module will cover a myriad of emerging uses of the sea and the legal problems that these bring to the international forum. The module also touches on aspects of maritime law, international law, and environmental law. The module commences with a brief introduction, and the history and development of the law of the sea before moving on to focus on the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea 1982 (LOSC). The first part of the module looks at each maritime zone in detail as laid out by LOSC, before moving on to examine regulatory issues in part two, such as: • Whaling • Environmental disasters and the protection of the marine environment • Underwater cultural heritage and the salvage of historic shipwrecks • Fisheries and illegal fishing practices • Piracy • Proliferation of WMDs and arms at sea • Marine scientific research and the mining of resources • Settlement of disputes
  • SXL-3148: Expert Evidence in Court (10) (Semester 2)
  • SXL-3150: Commercial Law (20) (Semester 2)
  • SXL-3153: Canadian Constitutional Law (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
  • SXL-3432: Intro to EU Public Procurement (10) (Semester 1)
    The main areas to be studied include: • Introduction to Public Procurement and EU Procurement Policy. • Procurement under the EU Treaty: objectives and the application of Treaty principles to public procurement: o free movement o equal treatment o transparency and o proportionality • European Union Procurement Directives o evolution of procedural rules on Public Procurement; o the rules on coverage (public sector and utilities) and types of contracts; o the tendering procedures and methods; o the procurement process including specification, advertisement, qualification, invitation to tender and evaluation; o the standstill requirements; o debrief and contract award; o the remedies regime. • Public Procurement in the United Kingdom o evolution of the regime, implication of devolution on the UK public procurement framework; o the key rules on advertisement, pre-qualification, invitation to tender and evaluations, standstill, debriefing and contract award and contract award); o the remedies regime • Community and national initiatives on public procurement, such as the framework on Collaborative Procurement Agenda, Efficiency reforms, Shared Services, and Transparency in Public Procurement; • Special issues – Concession contracts, defence procurement, SMEs, Third Sector organisations
  • SXL-3436: Intro to Interna'l Procurement (10) (Semester 2)
    The “International Procurement Regimes” module involves the study of the main principles, main rules and the functioning of UNCITRAL Model Law on Procurement, the Agreement on Government Procurement (GPA) of the WTO and the procurement rules of selected international finance institutions, all of which have impacted on legal principles in national procurement regimes. Students will gain an appreciation of the main features of international procurement regimes and will be provided with an examination of interesting aspects of the legal regimes, through an integrated study of focusing on the political and economic contexts of the rules and important contemporary developments. Specifically the course of study will involve examination of: 1. The objectives and rationales for regulating procurement 2. The United Nations Model Law on Procurement of Goods, Construction and Services - a model procurement framework? 3. The WTO Agreement on Government Procurement. 4. Regulation of procurement in international finance institutions. 5. Recent regulatory reforms in Public Procurement – examination of experiences from selected countries
  • Students must ensure you have a total of 80 credits in Law modules and 40 credits in the other subject and that you have a balance of credits between semesters (preferably 60 credits in each if possible)

40 credits from:

  • HGH-3112: Civil War: Eng & Wal 1558-1660 (20) (Semester 2)
    The course concentrates upon political and religious history - but social, cultural, economic and intellectual aspects are also considered where they are relevant to the core of the course. Major topics explored include: The ‘crisis’ of the 1590s; The impact of the arrival of the Stuart dynasty; Divisions in English Protestantism; Charles I’s Personal Rule, and the outbreak of civil war; The course of the conflict, and attempts at a settlement; The reasons for the regicide; The English Republic and the restoration, 1649-1660
  • HGH-3118: The United States, 1877-1945 (20) (Semester 1)
    The period 1877–1945 saw America transformed from a predominantly rural nation to a dynamic, diverse and industrialised world power. During this era, the United States became overtly active in foreign policy; the character of its population changed dramatically as new immigrant groups came from Eastern and Southern Europe and beyond; many strong challenges were mounted to the status quo as disadvantaged, marginal and minority groups – including working people, black Americans, and women – pressurised for rights and recognition; and the nation involved itself in two world wars and survived a crippling economic depression. The first half of the twentieth century saw the making of ‘modern America’, and many of the changes undergone by the country in this era continue to have repercussions today. This module will provide students with an in-depth understanding of the events and themes of this eventful era, introduce them to competing historical interpretations, and encourage them to study specific aspects of the era in which they take particular interest.
  • HTH-3124: Heritage and Identity (20) (Semester 2)
    Individual, group, local, regional, national and global identities; museums; political and cultural role of archaeology and history, the heritage in minority groups, the heritage of elites, oral culture, heritage and the nation state, the creation of heritage-based identities in past societies
  • HGH-3127: Europe Early Middle Ages (20) (Semester 1)
    1. The fall of the western Roman empire; 2. The foundation of the `barbarian¿ kingdoms; 3. Merovingians and Carolingians; 4. Charlemagne; 5. The papacy and monasticism; 6. Justinian and the Byzantine revival; 7. Culture and society; 8. Towns and economy; 9. The Vikings and the foundation of Normandy; 10. The creation of the caliphate of Cordoba. Students taking the course will study these topics using both primary sources (such as Gregory of Tours, Paul the Deacon, Einhard¿s Life of Charlemagne) and the modern historiography.
  • HGH-3135: Victorian Britain 1837-1901 (20) (Semester 2)
    (1) Victorian values (2) Economy, industry and work (3) Popular culture and leisure (4) Medicine and science (5) Technological developments (6) Poverty and crime (7) Votes for women (8) Eclipse of the elites (9) The British Empire (10) Shadows of war (11) Concluding lecture
  • HTH-3142: Americanisation (20) (Semester 2)
    This module examines American impacts on the rest of the world - in particular Europe ¿and addresses reactions to these focused by a critical approach to the concepts 'Americanisation' and 'Anti-Americanism'. In particular: . Attraction and resistance: ambivalences of Americanisation . Images and enemy images . The reciprocity of transatlantic cultural transfers . Anti-Americanism as a projection . Anti-Americanism in the inter-war period . Nazi Germany and America . GIs as agents of Americanisation . Americanisation and Sovietisation . Anti-American propaganda in the Cold War . The anti-Americanism of the New Left . Anti-Americanism and Anti-Semitism . Shopping mall, Disneyland and theme park in Europe
  • HTH-3143: The Reign of King Stephen (20) (Semester 2)
    This course offers students the opportunity to study the reign of king Stephen in the period 1135-54. It was, and has remained, controversial. Topics include: the roots of civil war: the reign of Henry I, the origins of civil war, the course of the war and the stalemate in the period1150-54, the role and characters of king Stephen and the Empress Matilda, the role of the barons, the social, economic, political impact of civil war, masculinity, kingship, queenship, women and power, attitudes to war and the role and views of the church.
  • HTH-3149: Britannia Rule the Waves (20) (Semester 1)
    (1) Introduction to the module, British Empire and Imperial Studies (2) Governing the Empire (3) British Policy and Trade (4) Technological Change (5) Scientific Exploration (6) The Empire: Asia (7) The Empire: America (8) The Empire: Africa (9) The Empire: Australasia (10) The British Empire and the Approach of War (11) Concluding lecture
  • HTH-3157: The Age of the Castle (20) (Semester 2) or
    HTC-3128: Cestyll a Chymdeithas (20) (Semester 2)
    Bydd y modiwl yn edrych ar y themâu canlynol: 1. Cefndir a chyd-destun hanesyddiaethol; 2. Gwreiddiau cestyll y cyfnod; 3. Cestyll a chrefft rhyfela yn y cyfnod; 4. Castell pawb ei dŷ: cestyll fel cartrefi ac anheddau; 5. Astudiaeth achos 1: Cestyll y Croesgadwyr 1098-1291; 6. Cestyll y dychymyg a’r delfryd sifalrig; 7. Astudiaeth achos 2: Cestyll yng Nghymru 1063-1415; 8. Tirlun a phensaernïaeth gastellog; 9. Cestyll a chartrefi caerog yr Oesau Canol Diweddar; 10. Machlud Cestyll yr Oesau Canol? Ceir cyfle yn ystod y seminarau i archwilio’r themâu hyn ymhellach.
  • HTH-3163: Nazi Germany 1933-1945 (20) (Semester 1)
  • HTH-3164: Violence in Early Mod. Britain (20) (Semester 1)
  • Students taking this degree must take 40 credits of History: 20 credits in semester 1 and 20 credits in semester 2.