Module NHS-3115:
Emergency Practitioner

Module Facts

Run by School of Health Sciences

60 Credits or 30 ECTS Credits

Organiser: Mrs Gillian Roberts

Overall aims and purpose

This module aims to strengthen and develop competence in emergency practitioners in order to enhance and optimise patient care. A variety of areas reflecting the diverse nature of minor injury management are covered including trauma, mental health, pediatrics, minor injuries and contemporary professional issues.

The module is designed to facilitate and guide the student to care effectively and efficiently for patients presenting with a range of conditions and injuries and aims to build on existing knowledge and skills to be knowledgeable practitioners in the dynamic field of emergency and unscheduled care provision. The module will guide students to develop critical thinking skills and translate their knowledge and skills into the clinical setting to meet patient’s needs.

Course content

Topics may include:

  • History taking and Examination
  • Physical assessment skills
  • Documentation (medical documentation)
  • Forming a diagnosis
  • Clinical Governance
  • Paediatrics Ethics
  • Consent & Legal issues
  • Anatomy
  • Radiology: Upper Limb IRmer Lower Limb X-ray interpretation and good practice
  • Head & Neck
  • Pharmacology
  • Pain management
  • Spine Pelvis
  • Skin Local anaesthetics
  • Trauma
  • Mechanism and patterns of injury
  • Clinical Conditions Limb Injuries, Head injuries (minor)
  • Fractures, Sprains ,Wound management, Suturing, Burns, Knee injuries and conditions. Shoulder and Elbow.
  • Hand Infections
  • Common Ophthalmic presentations
  • Ear Nose and Throat
  • Bites and stings

Assessment Criteria

threshold

Basic understanding of the facts and principles specific to the topics covered in this module. Basic understanding of issues relating to chronic disease. Students will be required to achieve a minimum of D- grade in order to pass the theory component of the module.

C- to C+

Good understanding of the facts and principles specific to the topics covered in this module. . Good understanding of issues relating to the emergency practitioner. This equates to a minimum mark of Grade C- in the Grading Criteria

good

Very Good understanding of the facts and principles specific to the topics covered in this module. Good understanding of issues relating to the emergency practitioner. This equates to a minimum mark of Grade B-in the Grading Criteria.

excellent

An excellent understanding of the facts and principles specific to the topics covered in this module and evidence of additional evidence gained by the student. Very good understanding of issues relating to the emergency practitioner. This equates to a minimum mark of Grade A- in the Grading Criteria

Learning outcomes

  1. Display a mastery of physical examination techniques and be able to critically evaluate the process used in order to make a clinical decision.

  2. Appraise and critically evaluate the legal and ethical issues involved in patient management and through advancing practice.

  3. Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the underlying anatomy of both normal function and common minor injuries.

  4. Assess, diagnose, manage, treat or refer patients presenting with a minor injury appropriately with minimal medical supervision.

Assessment Methods

Type Name Description Weight
Essay 50
Exam 50
OSCE 0
CLINICAL COMPETENCIES 0

Teaching and Learning Strategy

Hours
Lecture

Lectures - 100 hours

100
Tutorial

OSCE’s – 10 hours

10
Practical classes and workshops

Clinical demonstrations – 10 hours

10
Private study

Workbooks and e-learning

180
Fieldwork

Clinical mentorship/completion of competencies 300hrs

300

Transferable skills

  • Literacy - Proficiency in reading and writing through a variety of media
  • Computer Literacy - Proficiency in using a varied range of computer software
  • Self-Management - Able to work unsupervised in an efficient, punctual and structured manner. To examine the outcomes of tasks and events, and judge levels of quality and importance
  • Exploring - Able to investigate, research and consider alternatives
  • Information retrieval - Able to access different and multiple sources of information
  • Inter-personal - Able to question, actively listen, examine given answers and interact sensitevely with others
  • Critical analysis & Problem Solving - Able to deconstruct and analyse problems or complex situations. To find solutions to problems through analyses and exploration of all possibilities using appropriate methods, rescources and creativity.
  • Safety-Consciousness - Having an awareness of your immediate environment, and confidence in adhering to health and safety regulations
  • Presentation - Able to clearly present information and explanations to an audience. Through the written or oral mode of communication accurately and concisely.
  • Teamwork - Able to constructively cooperate with others on a common task, and/or be part of a day-to-day working team
  • Mentoring - Able to support, help, guide, inspire and/or coach others
  • Caring - Showing concern for others; caring for children, people with disabilities and/or the elderly
  • Management - Able to utilise, coordinate and control resources (human, physical and/or financial)
  • Argument - Able to put forward, debate and justify an opinion or a course of action, with an individual or in a wider group setting
  • Self-awareness & Reflectivity - Having an awareness of your own strengths, weaknesses, aims and objectives. Able to regularly review, evaluate and reflect upon the performance of yourself and others
  • Leadership - Able to lead and manage, develop action plans and objectives, offer guidance and direction to others, and cope with the related pressures such authority can result in

Resources

Resource implications for students

None (apart from finance to complete module)

Talis Reading list

http://readinglists.bangor.ac.uk/modules/nhs-3115.html

Reading list

Core texts: Graham Douglas, E. Fiona Nicol, Colin Robertson (2013) Macleod's clinical examination. Churchill Livingstone Elsevier. Edinburgh. New York. Thirteenth edition.

Purcell, D (2010) Minor Injuries, a clinical guide.Churchill Livingstone Elsevier. Edinburgh. New York.

Jonathan P. Wyatt, Mike Clancy, Colin Robertson (2012) Oxford Handbook of Emergency Medicine. Oxford University Press. New York, Oxford. 4th

Bradley, D (2013) Managing Musculoskeletal injuries. A workbook for autonoumous clinical practise. John Wiley & Sons Ltd