Module QXE-4028:
Myth and Early Modern Writer

Module Facts

Run by School of Languages, Literatures and Linguistics

30 Credits or 15 ECTS Credits

Organiser: Prof Andrew Hiscock

Overall aims and purpose

1. an understanding of the expectations and textual discussion of myth in early modern period. In addition, postgraduates will become familiar with the conditions in which the set texts were produced. 2. an informed understanding of selected authors. 3. an understanding of differing critical approaches to myth and early modern textual culture, including issues of authorship and textual transmission

Course content

This module will explore a wide selection of published and manuscript texts which deal with the highly complex and fluid concept of myth in terms of cultural appetites for narratives of: origination and belonging; eschatology and the representation of supernature; extraordinary grandeur in which the human condition may be pondered. Particular attention will be paid to the roles of the translator, the natural philosopher, the dramatist and the poet as creative purveyors of mythological narrative for early modern consumption. This module will offer opportunities for the postgraduate to explore analogies between the written text and the visual arts and the development of music in the period. In the course of this module, the postgraduate will be encouraged to pursue research with frequently neglected texts. Moreover, there will be ample time during the semester for the postgraduate to shape and develop their own enquiries.

Assessment Criteria

threshold

50-59% A Pass (C) candidate’s work will show many of the following qualities: • A satisfactory level of knowledge, analysis and expression. • Some familiarity with, and understanding of, relevant theoretical issues. • Generally sound organisation of argument, with some critical ability. • Accurate expression. • Competent use of quotation and references.

good

60-69% A Pass (B) candidate’s work reaching Merit will show many of the following qualities: • An advanced level of factual knowledge. • Significant [substantial] knowledge of relevant theories and types of analysis. • Some evidence of original thought. • The ability to organise and argue effectively, make balanced judgements, and demonstrate critical thought. • Fluent and accurate expression. • Competent use of quotation and references

excellent

70% and above (A) Typically, the work of a candidate reaching Distinction will show many of the following qualities: • Thorough knowledge and understanding of relevant theories and types of analysis. • Thorough knowledge of a range of sources and the capacity to engage these critically. • Introduction and discussion of original ideas. • Relevant, well-organised and sophisticated argument. • High ratio of analysis to exposition. • Maturity, clarity and cogency of expression. • Excellent handling of quotation and references.

Learning outcomes

  1. Understand and discuss the selected course set texts at an advanced level.
  2. Consider differing critical attitudes to course set texts at an advanced level
  3. Show an awareness of the interrelationships of text, context, authorship and textual transmission at an advanced level.

Assessment Methods

Type Name Description Weight
Essay - 5000 words 90
Presentation and discussion questions 10

Teaching and Learning Strategy

Hours
  1. 11 x 1-hour tutorial, weekly. 2. 11 hours of structured activities, such as critical reading groups, study groups, research seminars and colloquia.  
  1. 11 x 1-hour tutorial, weekly. 2. 11 hours of structured activities, such as critical reading groups, study groups, research seminars and colloquia.  

Courses including this module