Module SXP-1006:
Health & Welfare Issues

Module Facts

Run by School of History, Philosophy and Social Sciences

20 Credits or 10 ECTS Credits

Semester 1 & 2

Organiser: Dr Julianne Law

Overall aims and purpose

The purpose of this module is to provide students with a broad introduction to the challenges involved in securing satisfactory provision of health services, social care and income security to citizens. It will explore the choices and restraints facing policy makers, service providers and individuals. It will enable students to identify and analyse problems which we face in our daily lives using perspectives offered by social policy and other social sciences. It will explore: 1. The political, financial and organisational contexts in which health and welfare services are delivered, received and experienced. 2. The effects of demographic changes on health and welfare policies and provision, such as an ageing society and migration. 3. The nature of the ‘mixed economy’ of health and welfare provision. 4. The nature and causes of inequalities in income, health outcomes and life chances. 5. The ways in which social, economic and technological change is affecting the nature of modern welfare strategies. 6. How devolution has changed the nature of health and social care policy and provision in the UK. 7. How different ethical theories may be applied to dilemmas faced in medical ethics, with special reference to health and social care. 8. The options for individuals in determining their own need for health and social care services.

Course content

This module will provide an exploration of the ways and means by which welfare is delivered to service users and patients. It will examine personal, social, economic and political aspects of health and social care, and consider some of the moral and philosophical issues raised. The course also traces the development and use of concepts such as social need, health care need, welfare, social justice and equality, citizenship and social exclusion amongst others within the framework of the policy process. Students will consider a series of substantive issues, e.g. the care of older people, child protection, services for people with mental health problems, etc. Students will become familiar with a variety of theoretical perspectives used by the social sciences. They will examine the main institutions of health and welfare, and consider some of the main dilemmas of our age, e.g. how to balance individual and collective responsibilities; how to balance the needs of carers, and those receiving care; and how to address some of the ethical issues raised by modern medicine. To what extent should the state be involved in the provision of welfare - residually or universally? To what extent does the state amplify or produce social inequalities?

Assessment Criteria

threshold

A threshold student will be able to: Demonstrate a basic understanding (perhaps with some inaccuracies) of the 'mixed economy of welfare'; and show an appreciation of the costs of care systems. Describe some of the major theories and concepts that are basic to a study of social welfare policy and demonstrate some awareness of the role of values in social policy making Discuss meanings of the word ‘health’, and consider the range of human predicaments where ‘social care’ is required. Describe the main institutions of care, and explain the roles of institutional and community care. Show awareness of the nature, causes and welfare consequences of social inequality and disadvantage.

good

A good student will be able to: Demonstrate a good understanding of the 'mixed economy of welfare’; and show a sound appreciation of the costs of care systems. Describe a number of the major theories and concepts that are basic to a study of social welfare policy and demonstrate good awareness of the role of values in social policy making Discuss meanings of the word ‘health’, and consider the range of human predicaments where ‘social care’ is required. Accurately describe the main institutions of care, and explain the roles of institutional and community care. Show good awareness of the nature, causes and welfare consequences of social inequality and disadvantage.

excellent

An excellent student will be able to: Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the 'mixed economy of welfare’; and show a full appreciation of the costs of care systems. Describe and evaluate the major theories and concepts relevant to a study of social welfare policy and demonstrate good knowledge of the role of values in social policy making Discuss meanings of the word ‘health’, and consider the range of human predicaments where ‘social care’ is required. Accurately describe and analyse the main institutions of care, and explain the roles of institutional and community care. Show full awareness of the nature, causes and welfare consequences of social inequality and disadvantage.

Learning outcomes

  1. Demonstrate a basic understanding of key theoretical perspectives on welfare

  2. Show an understanding of the concept of the 'mixed economy' of welfare and an appreciation of the possible advantages and disadvantages of different modes of welfare delivery

  3. Identify some of the causes and consequences of resource inequalities.

  4. Show an understanding of the administrative and financial context within which health and welfare policies are constructed, including the impact of devolution on health and welfare structures.

  5. Demonstrate an awareness of the role of values in social welfare policy and practice

Assessment Methods

Type Name Description Weight
Essay 1,500 words s1 50
Exam 2 hours s2 50

Teaching and Learning Strategy

Hours
Seminar 10
Private study 166
Lecture 24

Transferable skills

  • Literacy - Proficiency in reading and writing through a variety of media
  • Computer Literacy - Proficiency in using a varied range of computer software
  • Self-Management - Able to work unsupervised in an efficient, punctual and structured manner. To examine the outcomes of tasks and events, and judge levels of quality and importance
  • Exploring - Able to investigate, research and consider alternatives
  • Information retrieval - Able to access different and multiple sources of information
  • Inter-personal - Able to question, actively listen, examine given answers and interact sensitevely with others
  • Critical analysis & Problem Solving - Able to deconstruct and analyse problems or complex situations. To find solutions to problems through analyses and exploration of all possibilities using appropriate methods, rescources and creativity.
  • Caring - Showing concern for others; caring for children, people with disabilities and/or the elderly
  • Argument - Able to put forward, debate and justify an opinion or a course of action, with an individual or in a wider group setting

Subject specific skills

  • Ability to formulate and investigate sociologically informed questions.
  • Use the theories and concepts of social policy and other social sciences to analyse policy problems and issues

Courses including this module

Compulsory in courses:

Optional in courses: