Module SXY-3015:
Crime & Power

Module Facts

Run by School of History, Philosophy and Social Sciences

20 Credits or 10 ECTS Credits

Semester 2

Organiser: Prof Martina Feilzer

Overall aims and purpose

strong textPower relations play a critical role in relation to crime, crime control and criminalisation, three areas that form the core concerns of criminological enquiry. The aim of this module is to enable students to glean a deeper understanding of this critical role. This will be achieved by focusing on discrete areas of inquiry that illustrate the power relations that underpin the state’s management of crime. This module aims to provide the key theoretical concerns and texts on power relationships between individuals, organisations and the state, especially within the framework of crime, violence and criminal justice. It analyses a range of phenomena from organised crime to State and genocidal violence.

Aims 1. The module aims to provide students with a thorough examination of a range of criminal behaviours, with particular reference to transnational crime and
globalisation. 2. It also aims to provide students with a historical, theoretical and comparative understanding of the diverse forms of human behaviour and transgressions. 3. To enhance student's intellectual, critical and theoretical concerns relating to the module's content. 4. The teaching methods in workshops are designed to encourage, further develop and generally support students as independent learners. 5. In order to ensure that students have attained the learning outcomes relating to challenging orthodox representations of the `problem of crime', they are expected to be able to draw upon a relevant variety of supportive evidence in constructing their assignments.

Course content

State crimes: from ghettos to genocide. How does criminology and criminal justice respond when it is the formal State who offends? How do we define crime, justice and victimisation in this context?

Transnational and organised crimes: human trafficking and the international trade in sexual services and illegal substances are examples of crimes which transcend national boundaries.

Interpersonal levels of crime and power: examples may include ‘honour’-based violence and coercion; homophobic hate crimes; gender violence in intimate relationships; what happens when the victim becomes the offender as in the case of battered women who kill? How do the law, society and criminal justice system respond to these forms of crime?

Assessment Criteria

threshold

Threshold students should be able to:- Explain what is meant by power relations within the context of crime, deviance and criminal justice; identify and explain some of the models of justice; appreciate some of the ways in which the application of power is legitimised or criminalised; locate crime and power within a broader explanatory framework.

good

Good students should be able to:- Examine and critically reflect on what is meant by power relations within the context of crime, devaince and criminal justice; explain with accuracy the various models of justice; evaluate and diverse ways in which the application of power is legitimised or criminalised; apply an understanding of crime and power within a broader conceptual framework.

excellent

Excellent students should be able to:- Examine and critically analyse power relations within the context of crime, devaince and criminal justice; critically analyse the various models of justice; demonstrate an insight into the diverse ways in which the application of power is legitimised or criminalised; locate critiques or crime and power within a broader conceptual framework.

Learning outcomes

  1. Apply an understanding of crime and power to broader frameworks, e.g. political and economic.

  2. Understand what is meant by power relations between and amongst individuals, organisations and the State in the context of crime, deviance and criminal justice

  3. Understand the different ways in which power can be used and abused.

  4. Acquire a knowledge of the mechanisms that help to protect individuals and organisations from these abuses.

  5. Appreciate the diverse ways in which the application of power is legitimised or criminalised.

Assessment Methods

Type Name Description Weight
Powerpoint presentation 30
3,000 word essay s2 70

Teaching and Learning Strategy

Hours
Workshop

There will be 12 x 2 hour workshops on a weekly basis. This will incorporate both lecture format and will also provide opportunites for collaborative learning and incorporate group work.

24
Private study 176

Transferable skills

  • Literacy - Proficiency in reading and writing through a variety of media
  • Self-Management - Able to work unsupervised in an efficient, punctual and structured manner. To examine the outcomes of tasks and events, and judge levels of quality and importance
  • Exploring - Able to investigate, research and consider alternatives
  • Information retrieval - Able to access different and multiple sources of information
  • Inter-personal - Able to question, actively listen, examine given answers and interact sensitevely with others
  • Critical analysis & Problem Solving - Able to deconstruct and analyse problems or complex situations. To find solutions to problems through analyses and exploration of all possibilities using appropriate methods, rescources and creativity.
  • Presentation - Able to clearly present information and explanations to an audience. Through the written or oral mode of communication accurately and concisely.
  • Teamwork - Able to constructively cooperate with others on a common task, and/or be part of a day-to-day working team
  • Argument - Able to put forward, debate and justify an opinion or a course of action, with an individual or in a wider group setting

Subject specific skills

  • Capacity to identify and describe the causes and consequences of social order and change in specific contexts.
  • Ability to formulate and investigate sociologically informed questions.
  • Appreciate a range of research designs and strategies and how they may be applied to sociological investigations.
  • Competence to carry out a piece of sociological research using either primary or secondary data, or both.
  • Undertake either on their own, or in collaboration with others, investigations of social questions, issues and problems, using statistical and other data derived from research publications.
  • The ability to identify criminological problems, formulate questions and investigate them
  • Competence in using criminological theory and concepts to understand crime, victimisation, responses to crime and deviance; and representations of crime, victimisation, and responses to these, as presented in the traditional and new media and official reports
  • The capacity to analyse, assess and communicate empirical information about crime, victimisation, responses to crime and deviance, and representations of crime

Resources

Resource implications for students

Students are not required to purchase any resources.

Talis Reading list

http://readinglists.bangor.ac.uk/modules/sxy-3015.html

Reading list

Key texts are available via Talis reading list. This has been created and approved. Other resources such as websites are available online.

Pre- and Co-requisite Modules

Courses including this module

Compulsory in courses:

Optional in courses: