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Module UXS-1018:
Creative Practice

Module Facts

Run by School of Music, Drama and Performance

20 Credits or 10 ECTS Credits

Semester 1

Organiser: Dr Dyfrig Jones

Overall aims and purpose

This module will introduce students to a variety of creative elements that will form part of their degree programmes, with particular emphasis on generic skills that can be applied in various areas of media production. This will include developing and researching ideas, basic production techniques and methods, script-writing skills, and creative reflection and evaluation. It will provide a useful foundation for the practice-based elements of the Media and Journalism provision offered in the school, whilst also helping to develop the students’ critical skills. The context of creative media production within the wider framework of the creative industries will also be addressed, as the relationship between creativity and employability will be discussed. This will establish an early awareness of the key links between these elements and the teaching provision subsequently provided on other modules.

Course content

Students on this module will attend a weekly lecture focusing on the following aspects of Creative Practice, amongst other issues: developing ideas, research, scripting for factual and fiction-based production, production methods and techniques, working as part of a team, project management, creativity and employability, and the importance of the Creative Industries sector. These will all be considered in the context of film, television, radio, podcasting, journalism and digital content in general. Students will also attend weekly workshops that will give them an opportunity to develop their creative skills and techniques. They will be able to develop the work they will be submitting as part of their creative portfolio during these sessions. Although the assessments will all be undertaken individually, students will participate in both individual and team-based exercises during the workshops. Health and safety guidance will also be provided at appropriate stages.

Assessment Criteria

good

B- to B+ (60-69%) - Strong knowledge - Understands most but not all - Evidence of background study - Focused answer with good structure - Arguments presented coherently - Mostly free of factual/computational errors - Some limited original interpretation - Well known links between topics are described - Problems addressed by existing methods/approaches - Good presentation with accurate communication

threshold

D- to D+ (40-49%) - Knowledge of key areas/principles only - Weaknesses in understanding of main areas - Limited evidence of background study - Answer only poorly focused on question and with some irrelevant material and poor structure - Arguments presented but lack coherence - Several factual/computational errors - No original interpretation - Only major links between topics are described - Limited problem solving - Many weaknesses in presentation and accuracy - Exceeds expectations for some primary criteria - Moderate factual knowledge with several weaknesses in understanding - A few ideas/arguments are presented but with weaknesses

excellent

A- to A* (70% +) - Comprehensive knowledge - Detailed understanding - Extensive background study - Highly focused answer and well structured - Logically presented and defended arguments - No factual/computational errors - Original interpretation - New links between topics are developed - New approach to a problem - Excellent presentation with very accurate communication

C- to C+

C- to C+ (50-59%) - Knowledge of key areas/principles - Understands main areas - Limited evidence of background study - Answer focused on question but also with some irrelevant material and weaknesses in structure - Arguments presented but lack coherence - Has several factual/computational errors - No original interpretation - Only major links between topics are described - Limited problem solving - Some weaknesses in presentation and accuracy

Learning outcomes

  1. The ability to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the processes linking pre-production, production, distribution, circulation, reception and use in the context of creative media practice (QAA Communication, Media, Film and Cultural Studies Benchmark Statement 4.4.i.,December 2019).

  2. The ability to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of how work is organised in the creative industries, whether individually or collaboratively (QAA Communication, Media, Film and Cultural Studies Benchmark Statement 4.5.iii., December 2019).

  3. The ability to research and identify possible employment destinations (QAA Communication, Media, Film and Cultural Studies Benchmark Statement 5.6.xi.,December 2019).

  4. The ability to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of creative processes and practice through engagement in one or more production practices (QAA Communication, Media, Film and Cultural Studies Benchmark Statement 4.4.viii.,December 2019).

  5. The ability to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the economic forces that influence and frame the media, film, cultural and creative industries, and the role of such industries in contemporary political and cultural life (QAA Communication, Media, Film and Cultural Studies Benchmark Statement 4.2.ii,December 2019).

Assessment Methods

Type Name Description Weight
LOGBOOK OR PORTFOLIO Creative Portfolio

Create a written portfolio including the following elements, allowing approximately 500 words for each one: (a) Proposal for a production idea that could be developed into a TV/radio production, podcast, or short film; (b) Original scripted material that could be used in this production, eg opening and closing links, opening or other significant scene; (c) Further additional information that may be useful, eg production methods/techniques, ideas for promoting your production, how it could be further developed; (d) A brief summary of 3-5 further ideas that could be developed into a TV/radio production, podcast or short film.

60
ESSAY 1500 Word Essay

1500 word essay - Discuss the significance of Creative Practice within the DCMS’s definition and categorisation of the Creative Industries.

40

Teaching and Learning Strategy

Hours
Private study

Students will be expected to work individually, undertaking research relevant to their assessment.

167
Lecture

11 x 1 hour weekly lecture

11
Workshop

11 x 2 hour weekly workshop.

22

Transferable skills

  • Literacy - Proficiency in reading and writing through a variety of media
  • Computer Literacy - Proficiency in using a varied range of computer software
  • Self-Management - Able to work unsupervised in an efficient, punctual and structured manner. To examine the outcomes of tasks and events, and judge levels of quality and importance
  • Exploring - Able to investigate, research and consider alternatives
  • Information retrieval - Able to access different and multiple sources of information
  • Inter-personal - Able to question, actively listen, examine given answers and interact sensitevely with others
  • Critical analysis & Problem Solving - Able to deconstruct and analyse problems or complex situations. To find solutions to problems through analyses and exploration of all possibilities using appropriate methods, rescources and creativity.
  • Safety-Consciousness - Having an awareness of your immediate environment, and confidence in adhering to health and safety regulations
  • Presentation - Able to clearly present information and explanations to an audience. Through the written or oral mode of communication accurately and concisely.
  • Teamwork - Able to constructively cooperate with others on a common task, and/or be part of a day-to-day working team
  • Management - Able to utilise, coordinate and control resources (human, physical and/or financial)
  • Argument - Able to put forward, debate and justify an opinion or a course of action, with an individual or in a wider group setting
  • Self-awareness & Reflectivity - Having an awareness of your own strengths, weaknesses, aims and objectives. Able to regularly review, evaluate and reflect upon the performance of yourself and others

Subject specific skills

  • An understanding of creative and critical processes, and of the wide range of skills inherent in creative writing. (NAWE Creative Writing Benchmark Statement 3.1).
  • An awareness of writing and publishing contexts, opportunities and audiences in the wider world (NAWE Creative Writing Benchmark Statement 3.1).
  • Artistic engagement and ability to articulate complex ideas in oral and written forms. (NAWE Creative Writing Benchmark Statement 3.2).
  • Ability to connect creative and critical ideas between and among forms, techniques and types of creative and critical praxis. (NAWE Creative Writing Benchmark Statement 3.2; English Benchmark Statement 3.2).
  • Reflective practitioner skills, including awareness of the practice of others in collaborative learning (NAWE Creative Writing Benchmark Statement 3.2; English Benchmark Statement 3.2).
  • The ability to synthesize information from various sources, choosing and applying appropriate concepts and methods (English Benchmark Statement 3.3).
  • Ability to formulate and solve problems, anticipate and accommodate change, and work within contexts of ambiguity, uncertainty and unfamiliarity (NAWE Creative Writing Benchmark Statement 3.2; English Benchmark Statement 3.3).
  • Ability to engage in processes of drafting and redrafting texts to achieve clarity of expression and an appropriate style. (English Benchmark Statement 3.3; NAWE Creative Writing Benchmark Statement 3.2).
  • Ability to gather information, analyse, interpret and discuss different viewpoints (NAWE Creative Writing Benchmark Statement 3.2; English Benchmark Statement 3.3).
  • Information technology (IT) skills broadly understood and the ability to access, work with and evaluate electronic resources (NAWE Creative Writing Benchmark Statement 3.2; English Benchmark Statement 3.3).
  • Re-creative skills – interpretation, innovation, versatility, and other skills relating to performance
  • Creative skills – conception, elaboration, adaptation, presentation, collaboration, preservation
  • Technological skills – digital capture, digital expression, digital innovation
  • Intellectual skills shared with other disciplines – research and exploration, reasoning and logic, understanding, critical judgement, assimilation and application
  • Skills of communication and interaction – oral and written communication, public presentation, team-working and collaboration, awareness of professional protocols, sensitivity, ICT skills, etc.
  • Skills of personal management – self-motivation, self-critical awareness, independence, entrepreneurship and employment skills, time management and reliability, organisation, etc.
  • Enhanced powers of imagination and creativity (4.17)

Resources

Resource implications for students

None

Talis Reading list

http://readinglists.bangor.ac.uk/modules/uxs-1018.html

Reading list

Bilton, Chris (2007) Management and creativity: from creative industries to creative management. Malden, MA: Blackwell Pub. Campbell, Vincent (2004) Information age journalism: journalism in an international context. London: Arnold. Caves, Richard E. (2000) Creative industries: contracts between art and commerce. Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press. Curran, James (2000) Media organisations in society. London: Arnold. Curran, James and Morley, David (2005a) Media & Cultural Theory. Hoboken: Taylor & Francis. Available at: http://www.Bangor.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=308543. Curran, James and Morley, David (2005b) Media & cultural theory: edited by James Curran and David Morley. Abingdon, [England]: Routledge. Available at: http://whelf-bangor.alma.exlibrisgroup.com/view/action/uresolver.do?operation=resolveSer vice&package_service_id=5237348840002422&institutionId=2422&customerId=2415. Davis, Howard H. and Scase, Richard (2000) Managing creativity: the dynamics of work and organization. Buckingham: Open University Press. Dwyer, T. (2010) Media convergence. Maidenhead: McGraw Hill/Open University Press. Available at: http://whelf-bangor.alma.exlibrisgroup.com/view/action/uresolver.do?operation=resolveSer vice&package_service_id=5237198770002422&institutionId=2422&customerId=2415. Dwyer, Tim (2010) Media Convergence. Maidenhead: McGraw-Hill Education. Available at: http://www.Bangor.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=557091. Gomery, Douglas and Hockley, Luke (2006) Television industries. London: BFI. Hartley, J. (2008) Television Truths: Forms of Knowledge in Popular Culture. 1st edn. Hoboken: Wiley. Available at: http://Bangor.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=351488. Hartley, John (2005a) Creative Industries. Hoboken: Blackwell Publishing Ltd. Available at: http://Bangor.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=228547. Hartley, John (2005b) Creative industries. Malden, MA: Blackwell Pub. Available at: http://Bangor.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=228547. Hartley, John (2008) Television truths. Malden, MA: Blackwell, Pub. Available at: http://bangor.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=351488. Havens, Timothy (2006) Global television marketplace. London: BFI. Hendy, D. (2013) Radio in the Global Age. 1st edn. Hoboken: Wiley. Available at: http://Bangor.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1215768. Hendy, David (2000) Radio in the global age. Cambridge, UK: Polity Press. Hesmondhalgh, David (2013) The cultural industries. 3rd ed. London: SAGE. Jenkins, Henry (2008) Convergence culture: where old and new media collide. New York: New York University Press. Available at: http://whelf-bangor.alma.exlibrisgroup.com/view/action/uresolver.do?operation=resolveSer vice&package_service_id=5237218410002422&institutionId=2422&customerId=2415. Lampel, Joseph et al. (2006) The business of culture: strategic perspectives on entertainment and media. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Available at: http://www.bangor.eblib.com/EBLWeb/patron/?target=patron&extendedid=P_257302_0&. Lampel, Joseph, Shamsie, Jamal and Lant, Theresa K. (2006) The business of culture: strategic perspectives on entertainment and media. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Available at: http://whelf-bangor.alma.exlibrisgroup.com/view/action/uresolver.do?operation=resolveSer vice&package_service_id=5235626010002422&institutionId=2422&customerId=2415. Lash, Scott and Lury, Celia (2007) Global culture industry: the mediation of things. Cambridge: Polity. McNair, B. (2006) Cultural chaos: journalism, news and power in a globalised world. London: Routledge. Available at: http://whelf-bangor.alma.exlibrisgroup.com/view/action/uresolver.do?operation=resolveSer vice&package_service_id=5237147110002422&institutionId=2422&customerId=2415. McNair, Brian (2006) Cultural Chaos. Hoboken: Taylor & Francis. Available at: http://www.Bangor.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=261295. Nayar, Pramod K. (2010) An introduction to new media and cybercultures. Chichester, West Sussex, U.K.: Wiley-Blackwell. Nowell-Smith, Geoffrey (1996) The Oxford history of world cinema. Oxford: Oxford University Press. O’Connor, Justin and Creativity, Culture & Education (Organization) (2010) The cultural and creative industries: a literature review. 2nd ed. Newcastle upon Tyne: Creativity, Culture and Education series. Starkey, Guy (2004) Radio in context. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. Street, Sean (2002) A concise history of British radio, 1922-2002. Tiverton: Kelly Publications. The handbook of journalism studies (2008). New York: Routledge. Available at: http://whelf-bangor.alma.exlibrisgroup.com/view/action/uresolver.do?operation=resolveSer vice&package_service_id=5237215570002422&institutionId=2422&customerId=2415. Wahl-Jorgensen, Karin and Hanitzsch, Thomas (2008) Handbook of Journalism Studies. Hoboken: Taylor & Francis. Available at: http://www.Bangor.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=401841.