Module UXS-2100:
Digital Journalism

Module Facts

Run by School of Music and Media

20 Credits or 10 ECTS Credits

Semester 2

Organiser: Prof Vian Bakir

Overall aims and purpose

This module will enable students to appreciate the fast developing world of digital journalism, together with its social, political and economic drivers and impacts. It will map the digital terrain, exploring the impact on journalism of Web 1.0, Web 2.0 and convergence. Students will examine new ways of doing journalism, and will evaluate the impact of digital journalism on political manipulation and social resistance. Throughout, issues of trust, authenticity and immediacy - all issues that are intensified in the digital environment - will be explored.

Course content

The module will map the digital terrain exploring the hopes and fears surrounding Web 1.0 and Web 2.0 technologies; and technological and cultural convergence of old and new media. New ways of doing journalism will examine the phenomenon of citizen journalism, the financing of online journalism when audiences no longer want to pay, and new methods of sourcing information (such as Wikileaks and Twitter). The impact of digital journalism on political manipulation and social resistance will be explored, through examining cultural practices such as sousveillance ('watching from below'). Throughout, issues of trust, authenticity and immediacy - all issues that are intensified in the digital environment - will be explored.

Assessment Criteria

threshold

D: • Knowledge of key areas/principles only • Weaknesses in understanding of main areas • Limited evidence of background study • Answer only poorly focussed on question and with some irrelevant material and poor structure • Arguments presented but lack coherence • Several factual/computational errors • No original interpretation • Only major links between topics are described • Limited problem solving • Many weaknesses in presentation and accuracy

good

C: Good • Knowledge of key areas/principles • Understands main areas • Limited evidence of background study • Answer focussed on question but also with some irrelevant material and weaknesses in structure • Arguments presented but lack coherence • Has several factual/computational errors • No original interpretation • Only major links between topics are described • Limited problem solving • Some weaknesses in presentation and accuracy B: Very Good • Strong knowledge • Understands most but not all • Evidence of background study • Focussed answer with good structure • Arguments presented coherently • Mostly free of factual and computational errors • Some limited original interpretation • Well known links between topics are described • Problems addressed by existing methods/approaches • Good presentation with accurate communication

excellent

A: • Comprehensive knowledge • Detailed understanding • Extensive background study • Highly focussed answer and well structured • Logically presented and defended arguments • No factual/computational errors • Original interpretation • New links between topics are developed • New approach to a problem • Excellent presentation with very accurate communication

Learning outcomes

  1. Develop a clear understanding of what Digital Journalism is.

  2. Reflecting on knowledge gleaned from the degree programme so far, analyse and appreciate how digital journalism is impacting on traditional journalism.

  3. Analyse and examine digital tools such as Wikileaks and blogs in terms of their reliability, authenticity and trustworthiness as news providers.

  4. Examine how traditional media are adapting new methods of news gathering and dissemination available in the digital age.

  5. Examine how digital journalism impacts processes of political manipulation and resistance.

Assessment Methods

Type Name Description Weight
INDIVIDUAL PRESENTATION Leading the Seminar

This will take place across the semester in specified seminar slots.

40
ESSAY Essay 60

Teaching and Learning Strategy

Hours
 
  1. Lecture, 1 hour per week x 11

  2. Seminar, 1 hour per week x 11

 

Transferable skills

  • Literacy - Proficiency in reading and writing through a variety of media
  • Computer Literacy - Proficiency in using a varied range of computer software
  • Self-Management - Able to work unsupervised in an efficient, punctual and structured manner. To examine the outcomes of tasks and events, and judge levels of quality and importance
  • Exploring - Able to investigate, research and consider alternatives
  • Information retrieval - Able to access different and multiple sources of information
  • Inter-personal - Able to question, actively listen, examine given answers and interact sensitevely with others
  • Critical analysis & Problem Solving - Able to deconstruct and analyse problems or complex situations. To find solutions to problems through analyses and exploration of all possibilities using appropriate methods, rescources and creativity.
  • Presentation - Able to clearly present information and explanations to an audience. Through the written or oral mode of communication accurately and concisely.
  • Teamwork - Able to constructively cooperate with others on a common task, and/or be part of a day-to-day working team
  • Argument - Able to put forward, debate and justify an opinion or a course of action, with an individual or in a wider group setting
  • Self-awareness & Reflectivity - Having an awareness of your own strengths, weaknesses, aims and objectives. Able to regularly review, evaluate and reflect upon the performance of yourself and others
  • Leadership - Able to lead and manage, develop action plans and objectives, offer guidance and direction to others, and cope with the related pressures such authority can result in

Courses including this module

Compulsory in courses:

Optional in courses: