Module UXS-3126:
Animation & motion graphics

Module Facts

Run by School of Music and Media

20 Credits or 10 ECTS Credits

Semester 1

Organiser: Dr Eben Muse

Overall aims and purpose

During the twelve weeks of the semester you will be regularly designing and creating digital animations in a variety of forms and methods, including pixilations, cut-outs, Flash, and rotoscoping. Each week you will have the opportunity to work a different project which will be added to a portfolio of work. At the end of the semester you will develop a larger, more challenging project. This module provides an introduction to the design, planning and tools involved in the production of a multimedia project. You will be introduced to three major types of multimedia software: vector drawing, bitmap editing, and key-frame animation. Each week you will be introduced to an influential piece of animation which may influence your own designs and develop your critical and self-reflective skills.

Course content

Keyframe animation, drawn animation, rotoscoping, stop-motion animation, infographic design, principles of design, elements of design, storyboarding and animation design, reflective practice, history of animation, major animation styles, current independent animations.

Assessment Criteria

threshold

D-: • Knowledge of key areas/principles only • Weaknesses in understanding of main areas • Limited evidence of background study • Answer only poorly focussed on question and with some irrelevant material and poor structure • Arguments presented but lack coherence • Several factual/computational errors • No original interpretation • Only major links between topics are described • Limited problem solving • Many weaknesses in presentation and accuracy

good

C-: Good • Knowledge of key areas/principles • Understands main areas • Limited evidence of background study • Answer focussed on question but also with some irrelevant material and weaknesses in structure • Arguments presented but lack coherence • Has several factual/computational errors • No original interpretation • Only major links between topics are described • Limited problem solving • Some weaknesses in presentation and accuracy B-: Very Good • Strong knowledge • Understands most but not all • Evidence of background study • Focussed answer with good structure • Arguments presented coherently • Mostly free of factual and computational errors • Some limited original interpretation • Well known links between topics are described • Problems addressed by existing methods/approaches • Good presentation with accurate communication

excellent

A-: • Comprehensive knowledge • Detailed understanding • Extensive background study • Highly focussed answer and well structured • Logically presented and defended arguments • No factual/computational errors • Original interpretation • New links between topics are developed • New approach to a problem • Excellent presentation with very accurate communication

Learning outcomes

  1. Research. design, plan and create a variety of animations and motion graphics

  2. Identify, evaluate, select and edit appropriate media formats for use in multimedia projects

  3. Demonstrate an understanding of the principles of graphic design and information visualization; evaluate and integrate them appropriately in multimedia texts

  4. Identify, evaluate and select appropriate animation techniques to achieve design goals

  5. Identify, evaluate and select from a variety of animation styles and representative texts for use to meet design goals

  6. Critically reflect on own practice within context of the creative field in order to development of own expertise.

Assessment Methods

Type Name Description Weight
Workshop Project 60
Final Project 40

Teaching and Learning Strategy

Hours
Private study

Research into animation techniques and development of animation projects.

156
Lecture

Presentation of animation techniques and principles built around discussion of examples from animation history.

11
Study group

Students work in a supervised study group providing peer feedback.

11
Practical classes and workshops

Weekly workshops using animation software to develop skills and awareness of animation principles. Each week students will develop a new project or extend a previous one using techniques discussed in lecture sessions.

22

Transferable skills

  • Literacy - Proficiency in reading and writing through a variety of media
  • Numeracy - Proficiency in using numbers at appropriate levels of accuracy
  • Computer Literacy - Proficiency in using a varied range of computer software
  • Self-Management - Able to work unsupervised in an efficient, punctual and structured manner. To examine the outcomes of tasks and events, and judge levels of quality and importance
  • Exploring - Able to investigate, research and consider alternatives
  • Information retrieval - Able to access different and multiple sources of information
  • Inter-personal - Able to question, actively listen, examine given answers and interact sensitevely with others
  • Critical analysis & Problem Solving - Able to deconstruct and analyse problems or complex situations. To find solutions to problems through analyses and exploration of all possibilities using appropriate methods, rescources and creativity.
  • Presentation - Able to clearly present information and explanations to an audience. Through the written or oral mode of communication accurately and concisely.
  • Self-awareness & Reflectivity - Having an awareness of your own strengths, weaknesses, aims and objectives. Able to regularly review, evaluate and reflect upon the performance of yourself and others

Subject specific skills

  • An understanding of creative and critical processes, and of the wide range of skills inherent in creative writing. (NAWE Creative Writing Benchmark Statement 3.1).
  • An awareness of writing and publishing contexts, opportunities and audiences in the wider world (NAWE Creative Writing Benchmark Statement 3.1).
  • Artistic engagement and ability to articulate complex ideas in oral and written forms. (NAWE Creative Writing Benchmark Statement 3.2).
  • Ability to connect creative and critical ideas between and among forms, techniques and types of creative and critical praxis. (NAWE Creative Writing Benchmark Statement 3.2; English Benchmark Statement 3.2).
  • Reflective practitioner skills, including awareness of the practice of others in collaborative learning (NAWE Creative Writing Benchmark Statement 3.2; English Benchmark Statement 3.2).
  • The ability to synthesize information from various sources, choosing and applying appropriate concepts and methods (English Benchmark Statement 3.3).
  • Ability to formulate and solve problems, anticipate and accommodate change, and work within contexts of ambiguity, uncertainty and unfamiliarity (NAWE Creative Writing Benchmark Statement 3.2; English Benchmark Statement 3.3).
  • Ability to engage in processes of drafting and redrafting texts to achieve clarity of expression and an appropriate style. (English Benchmark Statement 3.3; NAWE Creative Writing Benchmark Statement 3.2).
  • Ability to gather information, analyse, interpret and discuss different viewpoints (NAWE Creative Writing Benchmark Statement 3.2; English Benchmark Statement 3.3).
  • Information technology (IT) skills broadly understood and the ability to access, work with and evaluate electronic resources (NAWE Creative Writing Benchmark Statement 3.2; English Benchmark Statement 3.3).

Courses including this module

Compulsory in courses:

Optional in courses: