Modules for course V1W7 | BA/HFSIE
BA History with Film Studies with International Experience

These are the modules currently offered on this course in the 2019–20 academic year.

You can also view the modules offered in the years: 2018–19.

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Year 1 Modules

Compulsory Modules

Semester 1

  • UXS-1063: Film History (20)
    This module aims to provide students with an understanding of the link between film technologies, narratives, styles, genres, and subjects, and the societies in which film circulates. Lectures will introduce students to a range of important changes which have influenced the development of the filmic medium. The course will help students to situate the selected films in their cultural, , generic, and technological context. Lectures cover topics such as: Genre (Western, Screwball Comedy, Sport, Epic...), Narrative structure, Early Cinematic Milestones, The Introduction of Sound, Classical Hollywood Studio System, Asian Post-War Cinema, Italian Neo-Realism. Weekly screenings illustrate issues covered in lectures and associated readings, and will provide a case study for weekly workshops. Films/shorts to be screened may include: Le Voyage dans la Lune (Méliès, 1902), Man with a Movie Camera (Vertov, 1929), M (Lang, 1931), Blackmail (Hitchcock, 1929), Der Blaue Engel (Von Sternberg, 1930), Citizen Kane (Welles, 1941), Roma, Città Aperta (Rossellini, 1945), Rashomon (Kurosawa, 1950), Ladri di Biciclette (De Sica, 1948), À bout de soufflé (Godard, 1960), Memento (Nolan, 2000), There Will Be Blood (Anderson, 2007).

Semester 2

  • UXS-1062: Film Language (20)
    This module provides students with a toolkit for the analysis of the moving image and aims to provide students with a technical vocabulary to enable them to analyse and to discuss how films communicate meaning. The individual elements of this toolkit are analysed in detail. Lectures cover topics such as: Mise-en-Scene, Editing, Camerawork, Sound, Lighting, and Style. Weekly screenings illustrate relevant aspects of film form. Films to be screened may include: A Man Escaped (Bresson, 1956), The Innocents (Clayton, 1961), City of God (Meirelles, 2002), Atonement (Wright, 2007), Bourne Ultimatum (Greengrass, 2007). The Red Shoes (Powell & Pressburger, 1948), and Moulin Rouge! (Luhrman, 2001)
    or
    UXC-1062: Iaith y Ffilm (20)
    Mae'r cwrs hwn yn fodd o alluogi myfyrwyr i ddysgu hanfodion dadansoddi'r ddelwedd symydol. Bydd myfyrwyr ar y cwrs yn dysgu terminoleg dechnegol a fydd yn eu cynorthwyo i ddadansoddi a dehongli y modd y mae ffilm yn cyfathrebu ystyr. Bydd darlithoedd unigol yn trafod pynciau megis Mise-en-Scene, Montage, Gwaith Camera, Sain, Goleuo ac Arddull Weledol. Bydd dangosiadau o ffilmiau perthnasol yn cael eu cynnal yn wythnosol, er mwyn cyflwyno engrheifftiau o'r pynciau dan sylw. Bydd y ffilmiau a ddangosir yn cynnwys: A Man Escaped (Bresson, 1956), The Innocents (Clayton, 1961), City of God (Meirelles, 2002), Atonement (Wright, 2007), Bourne Ultimatum (Greengrass, 2007). The Red Shoes (Powell & Pressburger, 1948), ac Moulin Rouge! (Luhrman, 2001)

40 to 60 credits from:

  • HXH-1002: Birth of Modern Europe (20) (Semester 2)
    The Renaissance; state formation; multiple monarchies (Valois France, the Habsburg Dominions, centre and peripheries in Britain and Ireland); the Reformation in Britain and on the Continent.
    or
    HXC-1003: Genedigaeth yr Ewrop Fodern (20) (Semester 2)
  • HXH-1004: Intro Modern History1815-1914 (20) (Semester 1)
    This module provides an introduction to nineteenth-century history, in particular: - Key events and dates - The political geography of Europe - Industrial Revolutions - Workers - Workers’ Political Movements - Middle Classes - Liberalism and Conservatism - Elites - Revolutions - Nationalism and Nation States - The Disintegration of Multinational Empires - War and Diplomacy - Imperialism It also provides an introduction to basic study skills, in particular: - The Library - Planning, Literature Search, Bibliography - Essay Writing - References, Footnotes, Plagiarism
    or
    HXC-1004: Cyflwyniad Hanes Modern (20) (Semester 1)
    Bydd y modiwl hwn yn rhoi arweiniad i hanes y bedwaredd ganrif ar bymtheg, yn arbennig: - y chwyldro amaethyddol a’r chwyldro diwydiannol - yr elit a’r dosbarth canol - Rhyddfrydiaeth a Cheidwadaeth - gweithwyr a'r werin - mudiadau gwleidyddol gweithwyr - chwyldroadau - cenedlaetholdeb a hunaniaeth genedlaethol - rhyfel a diplomyddiaeth - Imperialaeth
  • HPS-1006: Ess. Skills for Ac. Success (20) (Semester 1) or
    HAC-1006: Ess. Skills for Ac. Success (20) (Semester 1)
  • HXW-1007: Wales: Princes to Tudors (20) (Semester 2)
    Wales in the age of Owain Gwynedd and Lord Rhys; Gerald of Wales; rise of Llywelyn ap Iorwerth in Gwynedd and over much of the rest of Wales; the reign of Dafydd ap Llywelyn and succession to Gwynedd; the hegemony and downfall of Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, prince of Wales; poetry and history writing in medieval Wales; Welsh political aspirations in l4th century; Owain Glyndŵr and his movement; Brutus, 1485 and political prophecy; Wales and the Reformation; Wales and the Renaissance; Wales and 16th-century politics – the Acts of Union.
    or
    HXC-1007: Cymru: Tywysogion i Duduriaid (20) (Semester 2)
    Oes Owain Gwynedd a'r Arglwydd Rhys; Gerallt Gymro; Llywelyn ap Iorwerth (m. 1240) a'i feibion; Penarglwyddiaeth a chwymp Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, Tywysog Cymru (m. 1282); barddoniaeth a hanes yn yr Oesoedd Canol; dyheadau gwleidyddol Cymreig yn y bedwaredd ganrif ar ddeg; mudiad Glyndwr; Brutus, 1485 a'r traddodiad proffwydol; Cymru a'r Diwygiad Protestannaidd; Cymru a'r Dadeni; Cymru a gwleidyddiaeth yr unfed ganrif ar bymtheg - y Deddfau Uno.
  • HXW-1010: Wales since 1789 (20) (Semester 1) or
    HXC-1006: Cymru yn y Byd Modern (20) (Semester 1)
    Wythnos 1: Darlith: Deall Cymru fodern ac amcanion y modiwl Dim seminar Wythnos 2: Darlith: Meithrin Cymru fodern (i): Diwydiant ac economi Seminar: Siartiaeth a Beca Wythnos 3: Darlith: Meithrin Cymru fodern (ii): Trosedd, cosb a moesoldeb Seminar: Y Gymru fywgraffiadol: David Lloyd George fel astudiaeth achos Wythnos 4: Darlith: Themâu (i): Mewnfudo ac allfudo Seminar: Mewnfudo Wythnos 5: Darlith: Themâu (ii): Iaith, addysg a chrefydd yn y 19eg ganrif Seminar: Cenedlaetholdeb, Tynged yr Iaith Wythnos 6: Darlith: Themâu (iii): Effaith y ddau ryfel byd Seminar: Y Gymru Lafurol Gweithdy: Eidalwyr yng Nghymru Wythnos 7: WYTHNOS DDARLLEN Wythnos 8: Darlith: Themâu (iv): Merched a llunio Cymru fodern Seminar: Cerddoriaeth boblogaidd Wythnos 9: Darlith: Themâu (v): Diwylliant poblogaidd a newid cymdeithasol Seminar: Merched mewn llenyddiaeth Gymreig Wythnos 10: Darlith: Themâu (vi): Chwaraeon a hunaniaeth Seminar: Hunaniaeth Wythnos 11: Darlith: Materion (i): Y frwydr am hunan-reolaeth Seminar: Y Cwestiwn Cenedlaethol Wythnos 12: Darlith: Materion (ii): Creu Cymru newydd? Seminar: Sesiwn adolygu
  • HXH-1011: Europe in the High Middle Ages (20) (Semester 1) or
    HXC-1011: Ewrop yn y Canol Oesoedd Uchel (20) (Semester 1)
  • Students on this programme must take at least 40 credits from the above modules, covering at least two of the three major periods of history (Medievel 500-1500, Early Modern 1500-1750 and Modern 1750 onwards

Optional Modules

0 to 20 credits from:

  • HAC-1001: Y Wladwriaeth Les (20) (Semester 2)
  • HPS-1004: Death of God (20) (Semester 2)
  • HPS-1005: Existentialism (20) (Semester 1)
  • HXA-1005: Archaeological Principles&Tech (20) (Semester 1)
    What is archaeology?; what archaeologists study; the history of archaeological principles and techniques; archaeological techniques: surveying, excavation, scientific analysis and dating; interpretation in archaeology; internet tools and resources, aerial photography, stratigraphy and experimental archaeology.
  • HXH-1005: Intro to History and Heritage (20) (Semester 1)
    Definitions of history, heritage and archaeology; the development of museums; cabinets of curiosities; new heritage sites; heritage agencies; the state and heritage management; heritage and landscape conservation; industrial heritage; heritage and identity.
  • HXA-1006: Intro. to British Prehistory (20) (Semester 2)
    What is prehistory?; homo erectus and the earliest human societies; from ancient to modern ¿ the Middle Palaeolithic; late glacial hunters of the Upper Palaeolithic; managing the land ¿ the Mesolithic; the Meso/Neo transition; an introduction to the Neolithic; tombs for the ancestors - death and burial; communal monuments; Bronze Age beakers and barrows - rise of the individual; Stonehenge and its landscape; settlement and agriculture - the earlier/later Bronze Age transition; the production and deposition of metalwork; houses and households in later prehistory; enclosures and Iron Age 'hillforts'; Iron Age settlement and agriculture; ritual and burial practices; Late Iron Age Britain and the Romans; regional variation; social change in prehistory.
  • HXA-1008: Intro. to Historic Archaeology (20) (Semester 2)
    This course will provide a foundation for the period demonstrating the main developments using examples and showing how interpretations have changed. For the Roman Period, the course will examine the conquest and military archaeology; the countryside (villas, native settlements, farming and mineral extraction); towns; craft and the economy; religion and burial; and the end of Roman Britain. For the Early Medieval Period, the course will examine the archaeology of western Britain from the fifth to seventh centuries; Anglo-Saxon settlement and pagan cemeteries; Anglo-Saxon rural settlement; the origins of Anglo-Saxon towns; the conversion and Anglo-Saxon monasteries and churches; the Picts; the Viking impact; and the archaeology of late Anglo-Saxon England. For the Later Medieval Period, the course will examine the Norman Conquest and castles; rural settlement; the countryside; urban settlement; craft and trade; and church archaeology, including that of monasteries.

Year 2 Modules

Compulsory Modules

Semester 1

  • HCH-2050: Debating History (20)
    The first part of the course is concerned with the use of the past made by historians and commentators such as politicians, the way traditions are invented (and destroyed), and introduces the different historiographical schools. The second part covers some historiographical (ie. concerned with the art of writing history) issues with emphasis on the various ideas about the study and writing of history which have developed over the last two centuries and which students need to understand in order to engage confidently with the different approaches which professional historians take to their work. This is taught through a case-study approach where students can apply the different approaches studied in the first part of the course to specific controversial historical subjects. The course will cover the following topics: Whig and Tory history, Ranke, the professionalisation of the study of history, nations, empire, structuralism, post-structuralism, revisionism, counter-factual history, case studies may change from year to year but will include topics such as The Peasants’ Revolt, The English civil war, the outbreak of world war one; suffrage, consumerism, the Welsh in history, the Reformation. American Civil war, Cold War; Oral history; National identity.
    or
    HCG-2011: Dehongli'r Gorffennol (20)
    Er y byddir yn rhoi peth sylw i rai o haneswyr mawr y bedwaredd ganrif ar bymtheg – fel Ranke, Macaulay a Marx – bydd pwyslais y cwrs ar hanesyddiaeth yr ugeinfed ganrif. Canolbwyntir gan hynny ar feddylwyr a thueddiadau allweddol ym maes hanesyddiaeth yn ystod y ganrif ddiwethaf gan astudio enghreifftiau penodol o gynnyrch y meddylwyr a’r ysgolion dan sylw. Ymysg y pynciau a astudir bydd Ysgol yr Annales, Hanesyddiaeth Farcsaidd, Hanes Merched, Hanes Llafar, a her syniadaeth ôl-strwythurol ac ôl-fodern. Neulltuir yn ogystal ddwy ddarlith i drafod agweddau ar Hanesyddiaeth Cymru yn y cyfnod diweddar.

Semester 2

20 credits from:

  • LXG-2008: The German Film (20) (Semester 2)
    This module will examine a selection of nine German films reflecting key themes in German cinema, from its beginnings to the present day. Students will be provided with an introduction to the history of German cinema, and will develop a detailed knowledge of the films examined both as historical documents and as cinematic texts. Whilst certain attention will be paid to cinematographic devices and the different movements associated with German cinema, the module will also explore the chosen films in a far wider context, examining the social and historical events surrounding the creation of the films, thus broadening students' knowledge of German history and culture. Primary Sources: Films: Das Cabinet des Dr Caligari, dir. by Robert Wiene (1919) M: Eine Stadt sucht einen Mörder, dir. by Fritz Lang (1931) Triumph des Willens, dir. by Leni Riefenstahl (1935) Angst essen Seele auf, dir. by Rainer Werner Fassbinder (1973) Der Himmel über Berlin, dir. by Wim Wenders (1987) Lola rennt, dir. by Tom Tykwer (1998) Good Bye Lenin!, dir. by Wolfgang Becker (2003) Das Leben der Anderen, dir. by Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck (2006) Recommended Reading Bergfelder, Tim, et al., The German Cinema Book (London: BFI, 2002) Cooke, Paul, German Expressionist Films (Harpenden: Pocket Essentials, 2002) Elsaesser, T., New German Cinema: A History (New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 1989) Ginsberg, T. and K.M. Thompson (eds), Perspectives on German Cinema (New York: G.K. Hall, 1996) Hake, Sabine, German National Cinema (London: Routledge, 2002) Brockmann, Stephen, A Critical History of German Film (Rochester, NY: Camden House, 2010).
  • QXE-2024: Alfred Hitchcock (20) (Semester 2)
    Alfred Hitchcock is perhaps the most notable example of a director whose films were popular both with audiences and with critics seeking to establish the credibility of film as an art form. His work provides a case-study of theories of authorship; of different national cinemas and studio systems, and of a particular genre, the thriller. In addition, the popularity and accessibility of Hitchcock’s films also raise questions concerning narrative, spectatorial pleasure, the gaze, and gender, and consequently provide an opportunity to explore the interrelation and limits of film theory and film practice
  • UXS-2025: Stanley Kubrick: Auteur (20) (Semester 1)
    Topics that will be covered in this module include all of Kubrick’s films, as well as how these intersect with events such as World War One, the Holocaust, the Cold War and the Vietnam War and such issues as science, technology, history, race, violence, gender, ethnicity, sexuality and war.
  • LXS-2033: The Cinema of Spain (20) (Semester 2)
    Spanish cinema and its pioneers Neorealism and political dissent in the 1950s (Luís Buñuel, Viridiana) Art house cinema in the 1960s (Víctor Erice, El espirítu de la colmena) The cinema of the transition: the `disenchantment¿ Popular genres in post-Franco Spain The Spanish film industry in the 1980s and 1990s Gender and sexuality is post-Franco cinema (Pedro Almodóvar, Hable con ella) Catalan and Basque cinema (Julio Medem, Tierra) The internationalization of Spanish cinema (Alejandro Amenábar, Mar adentro) Social realism at the turn of the century (Fernando León, Los lunes al sol) Women in contemporary Spanish cinema (Icíar Bollaín, Te doy mis ojos) The films are available in the School of Modern Languages DVD library. Primary Films: Luis Buñuel, Viridiana (1961) Víctor Erice, El espíritu de la colmena (1973) Pedro Almodóvar, Volver (2006) Agustí Villaronga, Pa negre (2010) Icíar Bollaín, Te doy mis ojos (2003) Recommended reading: Bentley Bernard P. E., A Companion to Spanish Cinema (London: Tamesis, 2008) Caparrós Lera, José María, El cine español de la democracia: de la muerte de Franco al "cambio" socialista (1975-1989) (Barcelona: Anthropos, 1992) Deveny, Thomas, Cain on Screen: Contemporary Spanish Cinema (Lanham: Scarecrow Press, 1999) D'Lugo, Marvin, Guide to the Cinema of Spain (Westport: Greenwood Press, 1997) Fiddian, Robin W. and Peter W. Evans, Challenges to Authority: Fiction and Film in Contemporary Spain (London: Tamesis Books, 1988) Jordan, Barry and Rikki Morgan-Tamosunas, Contemporary Spanish Cinema (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1998) Pavlovi, Tatjana, 100 years of Spanish Cinema (Malden: Wiley-Blackwell, 2009) Triana-Toribio, Nuria, Spanish National Cinema (London: Routledge, 2003) Resina Joan Ramon (ed.), Burning Darkness: a Half Century of Spanish Cinema, ed. (Albany: SUNY Press, 2008)
  • UXS-2050: Race & Gender (20) (Semester 2)
    Topics to be looked at will include, Senegalese Cinema, representing prostitution, women in photography, race and gender in performance art, representing women on film, women and genre, Women and horror, women and action, Australian Visual Culture, Aboriginal female film makers, remembering the slave trade, post-colonialism, neo-colonialism and representation, how we define ‘white’.
  • UXS-2059: Understanding Documentary (20) (Semester 1)
    This course will look at the development of documentary film, attempting to place important developments within a theoretical context. The course will begin by looking at the way in which the early pioneers of documentary film emerged in the 1920s, and seek to understand the contributions of John Grierson, Robert Flaherty and Dziga Vertov, and the relationship between their work. This will be followed by an examination of the emergence of Direct Cinema and Cinema Verité during the 1960s, and the challenges faced by those attempting to work within observational documentary. The rejection of the purely observational mode of documentary, and the rise of the participatory film-maker will follow, leading on to an examination of reflexive documentaries, the role of dramatisation within documentary film, drama-documentary and docudrama. The final part of the course will look at the influence of new technology upon documentary film, analysing the influence of both computer generated imagery and animation upon documentary film. Specific attention will be paid to the work of film-makers such as Albert and David Maysles, DA Pennebaker, Nick Broomfield, Molly Dineen, Errol Morris, and Kevin MacDonald among others.
    or
    UXC-2046: Y Ffilm ddogfen:Theori (20) (Semester 1)
    Bydd y cwrs hwn yn edrych ar ddatblygiad ffilmiau dogfen gan geisio gosod datblygiadau pwysig mewn cyd-destun damcaniaethol. Caiff hanes y ffilm ddogfen ei drafod yng nghyd-destun y cwestiynnau syniadaethol a ddilynodd o esblygiad gwahanol fathau o ffilmiau dogfen. Bydd myfyrwyr ar y cwrs yn edrych ar amrediad o ffilmiau, o'r 1920au hyd heddiw, ond bydd mwyafrif y ffilmiau a fydd yn cael eu harchwilio yn rhai cyfoes. Bydd gofyn i'r myfyrwyr ddadansoddi'r ffilmiau, gan gyfeirio at theori dogfen wedi ei ysgrifennu gan amrywiaeth o awduron, gan gynnwys: John Grierson, Dziga Vertov, Paul Rotha, Bill Nichols, Stella Bruzzi, John Corner, a Paul Wells, ymhlith eraill.
  • UXS-2062: Film Distribution & Marketing (20) (Semester 1)
  • LXF-2104: French Cinema 1895-1950 (20) (Semester 1)
    The French hold cinema in greater esteem than perhaps any other nation, both as an art form and as popular entertainment; since its inception, the septième Art has produced a wealth of talent and many films of world standing. In this course we will look - on the big screen - at prominent examples of French cinema from its first decades, from the earliest work of the Lumière brothers in the 1890s to the mid-20th Century. The course looks at the general development of French cinema in the period, concentrating on: (i) a major classic from the silent era; (ii) a film from the Poetic Realism movement of the 1930s; (iii) an artistic, non-realist film from the end of the period covered. Key texts Main films studied Luis Buñuel’s Un Chien andalou Jean Vigo’s Vigo’s Zéro de conduite Jean Renoir’s Boudu sauvé des eaux Jean Renoir’s La Grande Illusion Marcel Carné’s Hôtel du Nord Marcel Carné’s Le Jour se lève Main secondary texts Andrew, James Dudley. Mists of regret: culture and sensibility in classic French film (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1995). Armes, Roy. French Cinema (London: Secker and Warburg, 1985). Hayward, Susan. French National Cinema, (London and New York: Routledge, 2005). Hayward , Susan and Ginette Vincendeau (eds.). French Film: Texts and Contexts (London and New York: Routledge, 2002). Martin, John. The Golden Age of French Cinema, 1929-1939 (London: Columbus Books, 1983). Powrie, Phil and Keith Reader (eds.). French Cinema: A Student's Guide (London: Arnold, 2002). Williams, Alan. Republic of images: a history of French film making (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1992).

Optional Modules

60 credits from:

  • HAC-2002: Addysg yn y Gymru Gyfoes (20) (Semester 1)
  • HAC-2009: Cymdeithas, Iaith a Phrotest (20) (Semester 2)
  • HPS-2011: Paradoxes of Self: Nietz./Jung (20) (Semester 1)
  • HTA-2111: Ancestral Landscapes (20) (Semester 1)
    1. Introduction and the chronology of later prehistoric Britain and Ireland 2. Mesolithic background and the nature of hunter-gatherers 3. The Mesolithic/Neolithic transition 4. The environment, forest clearances and the role of cereals and meat in Neolithic diets 5. Settlements, houses and mobility 6. Neolithic material culture: pottery, stone tools, axes and flint mines 7: Places for the ancestors: the role of the dead in Neolithic society 8. Monuments 1: chambered tombs 9. Monuments 2: causewayed enclosures 10. Monuments 3: cursus, henges and stone circles 11. Theory 1: Prehistoric landscapes, phenomenology and experience 12. Theory 2: The natural world: natural places and human-animal relations 13. Ireland: a case study 14. Early Bronze Age: Introduction 15. Places for the dead: Earlier Bronze Age burial and ceremony 16. Early Bronze Age: elements of continuity, elements of change 17. Early Bronze Age/Middle Bronze Age transition 18: Dividing the land: Later Bronze Age Settlement 19. Later Bronze Age burial and ceremony 20. The production and consumption of prestige goods 21. Regional archaeologies? 22. Revision session
  • HTA-2114: Experimental Archaeology (20) (Semester 2)
    1. Introduction: experimental archaeology today and its links with ethnoarchaeology 2. The history of experimental archaeology 3. Experiment by design: designing experiments, recording data and methodology 4. Prehistoric metallurgical practices: copper and bronze production 5. Stone and flint technologies; production and use-wear analysis 6. Prehistoric metallurgical practices: iron production 7. Food production: cooking with stone and food storage pits 8. Making prehistoric roundhouses 9. Cremation pyres: a case study on Early Bronze Age practices 10. Taphonomies: understanding the formation of the archaeological record through experimental archaeology 11. Experiencing experiments and materials; revision lecture
  • HTA-2117: Roman Frontier Society (20) (Semester 2)
    One of the key themes of this module is the interaction between the Roman army and native populations, and the subsequent evolution of distinct frontier societies. Contextualisation will be central to the investigation of the archaeology. Examination of material evidence from military and civilian sites will include settlement, burial and environmental evidence. Iconographic and epigraphic evidence will also be examined, as will contemporary written sources (e.g. the Vindolanda letters). Key issues explored will centre on continuity and change, and topics will include syncretism and native resistance. The history of Roman scholarship and its influence on perceptions of frontier life forms an important aspect of this course, with particular emphasis given to current post-colonial approaches.
  • HTA-2118: Field Archaeology in Britain (20) (Semester 1)
    Lectures 1. Course introduction: outline of course aims, content, assessment. 2. Research designs and regional sampling. 3. Desk-based research: (using HERs, literature searches (including grey literature), accessing aerial photographs, historical documents, place name research, map regression analysis). 4. Surveying upstanding monuments: building recording; setting up a site grid (EDM and tapes); surveying earthworks; fieldwalking strategies. 5. Geophysical surveys: magnetometer, resistivity, magnetic susceptibility, GPR 6. Setting up an archaeological excavation: SMCs, landowner permissions, logistics, sampling strategy, schedule. 7. Doing an excavation: excavation techniques: dryland, wetland, contexts 8. Doing an excavation: recording techniques (planning, section drawing, small finds) 9. Doing an excavation: sampling strategies (soil samples, dating samples) 10. Excavating human remains 11. Planning post-excavation analyses and presenting sites to the public: the importance of outreach Workshops 1. Interpreting aerial photography and geophysical surveys: formation processes, site and landscape stratigraphy, plotting data 2. Making maps (downloading data from Edina, Illustration, plotting data) 3. Designing an excavation strategy for three different case-study sites 4. Environmental soil sampling; sorting of soil residues (course residues) and presentation and analysis of data 5. Interpreting archaeological field illustrations (e.g. sections and plans); site formation processes and stratigraphy; writing stratigraphic reports Fieldtrips 1. Using the HER and grey literature searches: Gwynedd Archaeological Trust (2 hours) 1. Setting up a site grid and surveying upstanding remains (5 hours) 2. Building recording (3 hours)
  • HTA-2120: Rethinking Archaeology (20) (Semester 2)
    Lectures 1. The origins of archaeological theory 2. The ‘New Archaeology’ and post processualism 3. Marxist and structuralist approaches in archaeology 4. The post-processualist critique 5. Multi disciplinary approaches to the archaeological record 6. The archaeology of people and social relations 7. Towards an archaeology of gender 8. Approaches to the study and interpretation of material culture 9. Contemporary approaches to archaeological landscapes 10. Understanding the built environment 11. The archaeology of ritual and religion 12. Archaeology in theory and in practice Seminars 1. The identification of cultural groups from archaeological evidence 2. The loss of innocence and the development of the ‘New Archaeology’ 3. Symbolic and structural archaeology 4. Re-constructing an interpretive archaeology 5. Social evolution and cognitive archaeology 6. How were past societies organised? 7. Representing gender in the archaeological past 8. Art or artefact: key debates in material culture studies 9. Experiencing the past: a phenomenology of landscape 10. House form and culture 11. What is ritual and religion and can we identify them in the archaeological record? 12. Critical approaches to archaeological fieldwork
  • HTH-2124: Heritage and Identity (20) (Semester 2)
    Individual, group, local, regional, national and global identities; museums; political and cultural role of archaeology and history, the heritage in minority groups, the heritage of elites, oral culture, heritage and the nation state, the creation of heritage-based identities in past societies.
  • HGH-2127: Europe, Early Middle Ages (20) (Semester 1)
    1. The fall of the western Roman empire; 2. The foundation of the `barbarian¿ kingdoms; 3. Merovingians and Carolingians; 4. Charlemagne; 5. The papacy and monasticism; 6. Justinian and the Byzantine revival; 7. Culture and society; 8. Towns and economy; 9. The Vikings and the foundation of Normandy; 10. The birth of Islam and the creation of the caliphate of Cordoba. Students taking the course will study these topics using both primary sources (such as Gregory of Tours, Paul the Deacon, Einhard¿s Life of Charlemagne) and the modern historiography.
  • HTC-2128: Cestyll a Chymdeithas (20) (Semester 2)
    Bydd y modiwl yn edrych ar y themâu canlynol: 1. Cefndir a chyd-destun hanesyddiaethol; 2. Gwreiddiau cestyll y cyfnod; 3. Cestyll a chrefft rhyfela yn y cyfnod; 4. Castell pawb ei dŷ: cestyll fel cartrefi ac anheddau; 5. Astudiaeth achos 1: Cestyll y Croesgadwyr 1098-1291; 6. Cestyll y dychymyg a’r delfryd sifalrig; 7. Astudiaeth achos 2: Cestyll yng Nghymru 1063-1415; 8. Tirlun a phensaernïaeth gastellog; 9. Cestyll a chartrefi caerog yr Oesau Canol Diweddar; 10. Machlud Cestyll yr Oesau Canol? Ceir cyfle yn ystod y seminarau i archwilio’r themâu hyn ymhellach.
    or
    HTH-2157: The Age of the Castle (20) (Semester 2)
    This module explores the following themes: 1. Introduction: From the ‘Castle Story’ to Current Thinking; 2. The Origin of the Castle; 3. ‘The King of the Castle’: Great Towers and Keeps; 4. ‘An Englishman’s Home is his Castle’?: The Castle as Lordly Residence; 5. The Castles of the Crusaders 1098-1291; 6. Castles and the Chivalric Ideal; 7. The Castles of Wales 1066-1415; 8. Castles and Elite Landscapes; 9. The Decline of the Castle?; 10. Romantic Ruins? Artists, Poets and the Heritage Industry You will be given an opportunity to focus in-depth on these themes and on the underpinning primary sources in your seminars.
  • HTH-2129: Thatcher's Britain (20) (Semester 2)
    The dominant theme of the module is the examination of the 1979-83, 1983-87 and 1987-92 Conservative governments and their policies. Potential students should thus be aware that the main emphasis of the module is politics and political history. Topics covered on the module include the origins of ‘Thatcherism’; the implementation of ‘Thatcherite’ policies after 1979; the Falklands war; the decline of the Labour party 1979-83; the miners strike of 1984/85; race riots and social decay in inner-city Britain; popular music and popular culture; foreign policy and the special relationship; the modernisation of Labour after 1983; the Hillsborough disaster; wealth, affluence and individualism and the break-up of Britain.
  • HTC-2132: Rhyfel Mawr trwy lygaid y Cym. (20) (Semester 2)
    (Wythnos 1) Cyflwyniad Darlith 1 - Adrodd hanes y Rhyfel Sut mae’r ddealltwriaeth o’r Rhyfel Mawr wedi newid dros y degawdau Seminar 1 - Trafodaeth o sut mae’r myfyrwyr yn edrych ar y Rhyfel, a’r delweddau sydd yn gyfarwydd i’r Cymry; gwylio rhaglen Y Rhwyg (1988), a gyflwynwyd gan Dr John Davies (Wythnos 2) 1880-1914 Darlith 2 - Sôn am ryfel; poeni am ryfel; paratoi at ryfel; ysu am ryfel? Darlith 3 - Gorffennaf i Awst 1914 (Wythnos 3) Gwleidyddiaeth: Lloyd George, y Rhyddfrydwyr a’r Sosialwyr Darlith 4 - Cymeriad Lloyd George; Cyfraniad Lloyd George; Chwedl Lloyd George; Atgofion Lloyd George Darlith 5 - Sosialwyr a’r Rhyfel Seminar 2 – Gwleidyddiaeth a’r Rhyfel. Sut wnaeth gwleidyddion bortreadu’r Rhyfel, yn ystod yr ymladd ac yn y degawdau canlynol. (Wythnos 4) Her i’r hen syniadau am wareiddiad Darlith 6 - Gwrthwynebwyr Cydwybodol; Merched Cymru a’r Rhyfel Seminar 3 - Ymladd a gwrthod ymladd: agweddau Gwrthwynebwyr Cydwybodol, ac agweddau cymdeithas tuag at wrthwynebwyr cydwybodol (Wythnos 5) Ennill y Rhyfel; colli’r heddwch Darlith 7 – Buddugoliaeth Lloyd George? Cytundeb Versailles Darlith 8 – Dirwasgiad a Dadrithiad: y 1920au; Gwersi 1914 a’r ymgais i gymodi â Hitler: y 1930au (Wythnos 6) Yn sgil y Dadrithio Darlith 9 – Ymateb llenyddol yn y degawdau ar ôl 1918: chwedl Hedd Wyn; All Quiet on the Western Front Seminar 4 - David Davies a’r mudiad heddwch; Dyhuddiaeth a gwrthwynebiad i’r Ail Ryfel Byd (Wythnos 7) Y Llewod a’r Asynnod Darlith 10: Trafodaeth y 1960au: ‘Lions led by Donkeys’; pwysleisio ffolineb a gwastraff y rhyfel Seminar 5 – Gwylio darnau o gyfres The Great War (BBC, 1964) (Wythnos 8) Conundrum ‘y ddau Ffrynt Gorllewinol’ Darlith 11: Y gwahaniaeth rhwng maes y gad a fodolodd yn Ffrainc a Fflandrys rhwng 1914 a 1918 a’r un dychmygol sy’n gread y cenedlaethau a edrychai nôl mewn syndod a braw Seminar 6 – Cofeb Mametz; gwylio rhaglen Mametz (S4C, 1987) (Wythnos 9) Atgofion hen wŷr Darlith 12 - Trafferthion gydag atgofion cyn-filwyr, er gwaethaf eu hatyniad amlwg Darlith 13 – atgofion Griffith Williams, Bob Owen ac Ithel Davies (Wythnos 10) Hanes Diwylliannol y Rhyfel Darlith 14 - Rhoi’r cyfan mewn i gyd-destun diwylliannol Seminar 7 – Portreadu’r Rhyfel Mawr yn y Gymraeg heddiw: Lleisiau’r Rhyfel Mawr (2008) + Sesiwn ar gyfer cyflwyniadau’r myfyrwyr
  • HGH-2137: USA, 1945-2001 (20) (Semester 2)
    Lectures on the module will focus on the social and domestic history of the United States and will include: Affluent society – America in the 1950s; The Kennedy assassination and its aftermath; LBJ and ‘the great society’; Civil Rights and the problem of ‘black America’; Nixon and the Watergate scandal; Crime and social dislocation; Ronald Reagan and the rise of Conservative America; Bill Clinton and post-Cold war American society; 9/11 and its impact. Seminars on the module will focus on foreign policy developments and will include: the origins of the Cold War; the Korean war; the Cuban missile crisis; the ‘race to the moon’; the Vietnam war and its aftermath; the politics of détente; Reaganism and the spectre of communism; the end of the cold war; the road to 9/11.
  • HGH-2138: Europe 1945-1992 (20) (Semester 1)
  • HTH-2145: The Lion of Justice - Henry I (20) (Semester 2)
    1. Background; 2. The youngest brother, 1068¿1100; 3. King of the English, 1100¿1106; 4. The conquest of Normandy, 1106; 5. The governance of the Anglo-Norman regnum; 6. Henry and the Church; 7. Rebellion and disaster, 1118¿1124; 8. The monastic chroniclers: Orderic Vitalis and William of Malmesbury; 9. Henry's personality, family, and environment; 10. The end of the reign and its aftermath. Students taking the course will study these topics using both primary sources and the modern historiography.
  • HTC-2156: Rhyfel Cartref America (20) (Semester 1)
    Y Gogledd a’r De Gwleidyddiaeth yr 1850au Caethwasiaeth Achosion y Rhyfel a’r Argyfwng Arwahanu Ymladd y Rhyfel Abraham Lincoln Y Cymry a’r Rhyfel Y Rhyfel a’r Gorllewin Rhyddhau’r Caethweision Ennill y Rhyfel Adluniad a’i Fethiant
  • HTH-2159: History in Practice (20) (Semester 2) or
    HTW-2159: History in Practice (20) (Semester 2)
  • HTH-2160: The Age of Reform 1770-1835 (20) (Semester 1)
  • HTH-2164: Violence in Early Mod Britain (20) (Semester 1)
  • Students must take two general modules in History (codes beginning HGH/HGC/HGW). Students can take 20 credits of modules from outside of the school.

Year 4 Modules

Compulsory Modules

Semester 1

Semester 2

40 credits from:

40 credits from:

  • LXI-3011: Adaptations in European Cinema (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    During this course you will be introduced to issues relating to the re-use of tradition through the study of adaptations and/or recreations of literary texts, historical events or historical figures in Spanish and Italian cinema. You will thus become familiar with the socio-historical and ideological concerns that characterise contemporary Spain and Italy and you will reflect on the importance of film as a cultural medium. Primary sources: Films - Bernardo Bertolucci, 'Spider's Stratagem' (1969) - Vittorio De Sica, 'The Garden of the Finzi-Continis' (1970) - Francesco Rosi, 'Carmen' (1984) - Carlos Saura, 'Carmen' (1983) - Film and literary adaptions of the myth of Pygmalion - David Trueba, 'Soldados de Salamina' (2003) Primary sources: Texts ** A Dossier with all compulsory reading material (including short primary sources and required critical reading for seminars) will be made available from SMLC office in week 1. - Borges, Jorge Luis, "Theme of the Traitor and the Hero" in 'Labyrinths' (Penguin Books, 1970) [in dossier] - Bassani, Giorgio, 'The Garden of the Finzi-Continis' (Quartet Books, 1997) or Bassani, Giorgio 'Il Giardino dei Finzi-Contini' (Einaudi, 1999) - Bizet, Georges, 'Carmen', libretto by Henri Meilhac and Ludovic Halévy with English [in dossier] - Mérimée, Prosper, 'Carmen' trans. by Nicholas Jotcham (Oxford: Oxford UP, 1998) [in dossier] - Quim Monzó, ‘Pigmalió’, in El perquè de toto plegat (Quaderns Crema, 1993). - Javier Cercas, 'Soldados de Salamina' (Tusqusts Editores, 2003); 'Soldiers of Salamis' (Bloomsbury, 2003)
  • UXS-3025: Stanley Kubrick: Auteur (20) (Semester 1)
    The enigmatic Stanley Kubrick was one of the most well-known filmmakers of the twentieth century. Although not prolific, his work was widely admired both by critics and mass audiences. Kubrick's films also provide a prism through which we can view the major events of the twentieth century including World War One, the Holocaust, the Cold War and the Vietnam War. In doing so, his films provide an opportunity to explore the key themes of science, technology, history, race, violence, gender, ethnicity, sexuality and war. Teaching is by means of a two-hour seminar per week. In addition, students are required to organise small-group viewing of designated films per week.
  • LXS-3041: Iberian Identities on Screen (20) (Semester 2)
    The module will cover the following topics: 1) Theorising national cinema: key concepts; 2) Challenging the hegemonic gaze: the Barcelona School of Film; 3) Staging Identity: Adaptations of theatre and the novel 4) Re-mapping the urban landscape: the films of Ventura Pons; 5) Female Subjectivity and Authorship in Sílvia Munt’s Gala (2003); 6) Monstrous Identities: containing illness and sexual deviance in El mar by Agustí Villaronga; 7) Trauma in Elisa K by Judith Colell and Jordi Cadena; 8) The New Documentary: Memory and Reconstruction; 9) Beyond National Boundaries: Transnationalism and Multilingualism in Els nens salvatges by Patricia Ferreira ; 10) New Directions: science fiction and the horror genre; and 11) Scene-Analysis (one-hour in-class assessment) & Revision and Essay Preparation. Core films: Delete Nedar by Carla Subirana
  • UXS-3050: Race & Gender (20) (Semester 2)
    Topics to be looked at will include, Senegalese Cinema, women in photography, race and gender in performance art, representing women on film, women and genre, Women and horror, women and action, Australian Visual Culture, Aboriginal female film makers, remembering the slave trade, post-colonialism, neo-colonialism and representation, how we define `white'.
  • UXS-3062: Film Distribution & Marketing (20) (Semester 1)
  • LXF-3106: French Cinema since 1960 (20) (Semester 2)
    In chronological terms, this course follows on from module LXF2104 French Cinema 1895-1950. However, students who have not taken LXF2104 or have not previously studied cinema are more than welcome to take this module. This course will focus on French cinema from the New Wave period of the 1950s and 1960s to the new millennium. Through analysis of films by four different directors from four different decades, key cinematic trends will be identified, analysed and contextualized. Key trends / periods to be studied include 1950s/60s New Wave cinema, the "cinéma du look" of the 1980s, and the renewal of social and political cinema in France since 1995. This will expose students to key concepts in film studies and encourage critical reflection on how the range of techniques utilised by a director contribute to cinematic meaning. The films studied will be situated both in relation to cinematic and political trends contemporary to their production. Key texts Austin, Guy. 1996. Contemporary French Cinema: An Introduction . (Manchester and New York: Manchester University Press). Ezra, Elizabeth. 2004. European Cinema (Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press). Hayward, Susan. 2005 (or 1993). French National Cinema, (London and New York: Routledge). This book is available on the library website as an e-book: click here. Hayward , Susan and Ginette Vincendeau (eds.). 2002. French Film: Texts and Contexts (London and New York: Routledge). Hjort, Mette and Scott Mackenzie. 2000. Cinema and Nation (London and New York: Routledge). See chs. 4-7, esp. Ch.6 on 'Framing National Cinemas' by Susan Hayward. This book is available via the library website as an e-book: click here. Kline, T. Jefferson. 2010. Unravelling French Cinema (Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell). Available as an e-book via the Bangor University website: http://www.bangor.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=485677. Powrie, Phil (ed.). 1999. French cinema in the 1990s : continuity and difference (Oxford: Oxford University Press). Powrie, Phil and Keith Reader (eds.). 2002. French Cinema: A Student's Guide (London: Arnold). See esp. pp. 3-53. This book is available on the library website as an e-book: click here. Any other learning resources The core films studied are Jean-Luc Godard's A Bout de souffle (1960), Jean-Luc Godard's Week-end (1967), Claude Chabrol's Le Boucher (1970), Luc Besson's Subway, Jacques Martineau and Olivier Ducastel's Drôle de Félix (1999) and Nicolas Philibert's Etre et avoir (2002) and Michel Haznavicius' The Artist (2011).