Module VPR-3217:
Fundamentalism

Module Facts

Run by School of History, Philosophy and Social Sciences

20 Credits or 10 ECTS Credits

Semester 1

Organiser: Dr Farhaan Wali

Overall aims and purpose

This module introduces students to the theological underpinnings of fundamentalism and the background to its emergence.

Course content

This course will focus on the analysis of the broad frame of religious fundamentalism, its history, ramifications and impact on relations between peoples and societies. It will specifically look into the different models of responses that different religious traditions have taken to face up to the challenges of fundamentalism. The historical contexts of fundamentalism will also be examined. The course will review issues relating to fundamentalism and its foundations in different religious traditions. Thus, students will be introduced not only to the theory of religious fundamentalism, but also to case studies of religious fundamentalism.

Assessment Criteria

C- to C+

Good C- - C +. Submitted work is competent throughout and occasionally distinguished by superior style, approach and choice of supporting materials. It demonstrates:  Good structure and logically developed arguments.  At least in parts draws on material that has been sourced and assessed as a result of independent study, or in a way unique to the student.  Assertions are, in the main, backed by evidence and sound reasoning.  Accuracy and presentation in an appropriate academic style.

good

Very Good B- - B+. Submitted work is competent throughout and distinguished by superior style, approach and choice of supporting materials. It demonstrates:  Very good structure and logically developed arguments.  Draws on material that has been sourced and assessed as a result of independent study, or in a way unique to the student.  Assertions are backed by evidence and sound reasoning.  Accuracy and presentation in an appropriate academic style.

threshold

Generally accurate but with omissions and errors.  Assertions are made without clear supporting evidence or reasoning.  Has structure but is lacking in clarity and therefore relies on the reader to make links and assumptions.  Draws on a relatively narrow range of material

Learning outcomes

  1. To be familiar with the debates on fundamentalism.

  2. To understand the dimensions of fundamentalism and its relationship with religious scripture and practice.

  3. To analyse critically theories that underpin the theory of fundamentalism and opposing theories to it.

  4. To present sound written and oral argument and provide personal views for the development of debates about fundamentalism.

  5. To identify the concepts of religious fundamentalism, the relationship with the individual and society; and to provide a framework for discussion of the main problems and issues in the modern world.

Assessment Methods

Type Name Description Weight
Essay 75
Student Presentation (single/group) 25

Teaching and Learning Strategy

Hours
Private study 176
Lecture 24

Transferable skills

  • Literacy - Proficiency in reading and writing through a variety of media
  • Self-Management - Able to work unsupervised in an efficient, punctual and structured manner. To examine the outcomes of tasks and events, and judge levels of quality and importance
  • Exploring - Able to investigate, research and consider alternatives
  • Information retrieval - Able to access different and multiple sources of information
  • Inter-personal - Able to question, actively listen, examine given answers and interact sensitevely with others
  • Critical analysis & Problem Solving - Able to deconstruct and analyse problems or complex situations. To find solutions to problems through analyses and exploration of all possibilities using appropriate methods, rescources and creativity.
  • Presentation - Able to clearly present information and explanations to an audience. Through the written or oral mode of communication accurately and concisely.
  • Teamwork - Able to constructively cooperate with others on a common task, and/or be part of a day-to-day working team
  • Argument - Able to put forward, debate and justify an opinion or a course of action, with an individual or in a wider group setting
  • Self-awareness & Reflectivity - Having an awareness of your own strengths, weaknesses, aims and objectives. Able to regularly review, evaluate and reflect upon the performance of yourself and others
  • Leadership - Able to lead and manage, develop action plans and objectives, offer guidance and direction to others, and cope with the related pressures such authority can result in

Subject specific skills

  • Articulacy in identifying underlying issues in a wide variety of debates.
  • Precision of thought and expression in the analysis and formulation of complex and controversial problems.
  • Sensitivity in interpretation of religious and philosophical texts drawn from a variety of ages and/or traditions.
  • Clarity and rigour in the critical assessment of arguments presented in such texts.
  • The ability to use and criticise specialised religious and philosophical terminology.
  • The ability to abstract and analyse arguments, and to identify flaws in them, such as false premises and invalid reasoning.
  • The ability to construct rationally persuasive arguments for or against specific religious and philosophical claims.
  • The ability to move between generalisation and appropriately detailed discussion, inventing or discovering examples to support or challenge a position, and distinguishing relevant and irrelevant considerations.
  • The ability to consider unfamiliar ideas and ways of thinking, and to examine critically presuppositions and methods within the disciplines of philosophy and religion.

Resources

Talis Reading list

http://readinglists.bangor.ac.uk/modules/vpr-3217.html

Reading list

Reading List

Marty, Martin E., and Appleby, Scott R. (1994) Fundamentalisms Comprehended (The Fundamentalism Project). University Chicago Press: Chicago.

Marty, Martin E., and Appleby, Scott R. (1994) Fundamentalisms Observed (The Fundamentalism Project). University Chicago Press: Chicago.

Marty, Martin E., and Appleby, Scott R. (1994) Accounting for Fundamentalisms (The Fundamentalism Project). University Chicago Press: Chicago.

Marty, Martin E., and Appleby, Scott R. (1994) Fundamentalism and Society (The Fundamentalism Project). University Chicago Press: Chicago.

Marty, Martin E., and Appleby, Scott R. (1994) Fundamentalisms and the State (The Fundamentalism Project). University Chicago Press: Chicago.

Barr, J. (1978) Fundamentalism (The Westminster Press: Philadelphia)

Barr, J. (1984) Escaping from Fundamentalism

Ruthven, M (2005) Fundamentalism: The Search for Meaning (Oxford University Press)

Partridge, Christopher H. (2001) Fundamentalism (Paternoster Press)

Almond, G. A., Appleby, R. S., and Sivan, E. (2003) Strong Religion: The Rise of Fundamentalism Around the World (University Chicago Press: Chicago)

Lawrence, B. (1990) Defenders of God: The fundamentalist revolt against the modern age (I.B.Tauris)

Armstrong, Karen. (2000) The Battle for God: Fundamentalism in Judaism, Christianity and Islam (Harper Collins Press)

Bruce, Steve. (2000) Fundamentalism (Blackwell Publishers)

Milton-Edwards, B. (2005) Islamic Fundamentalism Since 1945

Ethridge, Maurice F., and Feagin, Joe R. (1979) Varieties of "Fundamentalism": A Conceptual and Empirical Analysis of Two Protestant Denominations (Source: The Sociological Quarterly, Vol. 20, No. 1 (Winter, 1979), pp. 37-48)

Shahak, Israel., and Mezvinsky, Norton. (1999) Jewish Fundamentalism (London: Pluto Press).

Davidson, Lawrence. (1998) Islamic Fundamentalism (Greenwood Press)

Abbas, Tahir (ed.) Islamic Political Radicalism (Edinburgh Press)

Courses including this module