Modules for course WR92 | BA/CSTG
BA German and Creative Studies

These were the modules for this course in the 2017–18 academic year.

You can also view the modules offered in the years: 2018–19; 2019–20.

Find out more about studying and applying for this degree.

Use the buttons after the module titles (where available) to see a brief description of the content, or:
Show all descriptions
Hide all descriptions

Year 1 Modules

Compulsory Modules

40 credits from:

  • LZG-1001: German Language Skills (20) (Semester 1 + 2) Core
    This module has been designed in order to enable post 'A' level students to develop written communicative skills in German by extending linguistic competence acquired at 'A' level. It comprises a text-based class in which students have the opportunity to develop translation skills and paraphrasing techniques. Students also have the opportunity to revise and consolidate key areas of grammar in a second class which constitutes the grammatical spine of the module. The texts used in this module are chosen from a range of sources including the media and literary works in order to familiarise students with variations in tone and register. A thematic approach is used in the text-based class in order to enable students to gain an insight into particular German themes and issues while developing the various written communicative skills outlined. Set texts: Fehringer, Carol, German Grammar in Context: Analysis and Practice (London: Arnold, 2002) Zorach, Cecile, Charlotte Melin & Elizabeth A. Kautz, English Grammar for Students of German, 5th edn (USA: The Olivia and Hill Press, 2009) Stocker, Paul, Wort für Wort. A new advanced German vocabulary, 5th edn (London: Hodder & Stoughton, 2010) German-English dictionary: Oxford-Duden German Dictionary (Oxford) or Collins German Dictionary (Collins) German-German dictionary: (Wahrig, Langenscheidt or Duden)
  • LZG-1002: Advanced German 2 (20) (Semester 1 + 2) Core
    This topic-based module complements LZS1001 by developing proficiency in spoken German acquired at 'A' level. A range of audio and visual aids is used in each class in order to stimulate group discussions, debates and individual presentations on a particular theme. Aural skills are also developed through audio and video comprehension exercises. The purpose of this module is to enable students to defend themselves orally in a range of topics relating to contemporary life and society in the German-speaking world and to improve comprehension of different German accents Set Texts: Deutschland 09. 13 Kurzfilme zur Lage der Nation, dir. by Dani Levi, Fatih Akin et al. (piffl medien, 2009) Sven Regener, Herr Lehmann (Munich: Goldman, 2003) Herr Lehmann, dir. by Leander Haußmann (Universal, 2004) * The dictionaries and websites listed for LZG-LCG 1001 are also useful for students on this module. Other Learning Resources: Course Reader will be provided with extra materials needed for class Students registered for this module (and for LZG-LCG 1001) are expected to complete the School’s co-curricular Self-Study Portfolio which is available to download from the School’s website. This portfolio encourages students to read German-language newspapers and watch German TV and German films. They should also complete online grammar exercises and read one German-language novel per semester. Students should complete one portfolio for German per semester.
  • LZG-1003: German for Beginners I (20) (Semester 1) Core
    The module is devised to suit 'ab initio' and post-GCSE students of German and focuses on the development of basic oral, aural and written communicative skills. The module involves an introduction to and [in the case of those with GCSE knowledge of the language] a revision of key areas of grammar (present and past tenses, the future and conditional tenses, nouns, adjectives, prepositions). Students will acquire general vocabulary and key expressions relating to self, family, daily routine, hobbies, likes and dislikes, in part through role-play situations. Using appropriate audio/visual aids, students will also be introduced to modern and contemporary German culture and society Key Text Storz, Thomas, Jutta Müller and Hartmut Aufderstraße, Delfin (Munich: Hueber Verlag, 2014). Websites SMLC offers a link list for all language students that covers the most important resources (newspapers, TV channels, online grammar and dictionaries, etc.) in the language(s) that they study: http://www.bangor.ac.uk/ml/links-german.php.en (German online resources) http://www.bangor.ac.uk/ml/links-welsh.php.en (Welsh medium resources) Additionally, students are encouraged to consult: English-German Context Dictionary: http://www.linguee.com/
  • LZG-1004: German for Beginners II (20) (Semester 2) Core
    This module is aimed at all first year students who have completed German for Beginners 1. The module aims to develop the basic oral, aural and written communicative skills acquired in semester 1 in order to bring students up to and beyond a level of proficiency equivalent to 'A' level. Students apply the grammatical principles learned in semester 1 to extended pieces of writing and also focus on more complex grammatical structures. Aural communicative skills are developed through audio and video tape comprehension exercises and students are required to make individual presentations on more sophisticated topics Course book: Storz, Thomas, Jutta Müller and Hartmut Aufderstraße, Delfin (Munich: Hueber Verlag, 2014). Websites: SMLC offers a link list for all language students that covers the most important resources (newspapers, TV channels, online grammar and dictionaries, etc.) in the language(s) that they study: http://www.bangor.ac.uk/ml/links-german.php.en (German online resources) http://www.bangor.ac.uk/ml/links-welsh.php.en (Welsh medium resources) Additionally, students are encouraged to consult: English-German Context Dictionary: http://www.linguee.com/
  • Students with A level German must take LZG-1001 and LZG-1002 . Students without A level German must take LZG-1003 and LZG-1004.

Optional Modules

60 credits from:

  • UXS-1001: Intro to Practical Journalism (20) (Semester 1)
    The Basics of Writing a News Story; How to write Intros, Drop Intros, Lively Intros; What makes a good news story?; Where do stories come from?; How to build a contacts book; How to conduct an interview; Writing for TV and Radio; Colour and Feature Writing; An Introduction to Shorthand; How to deal with breaking news.
    or
    UXC-1001: Cyfl. i Newyddiaduraeth Ymarf. (20) (Semester 1)
    Hanfodion ysgrifennu straeon newyddion; Sut i ysgrifennu Intros, Drop Intros, ac Intros Bywiog; Beth sy’n gwneud stori dda?; O le mae straeon yn dod?; Sut i greu llyfr contacts; Sut i gynnal cyfweliad; Ysgrifennu ar gyfer teledu a radio; Ysgrifennu erthyglau nodwedd; Cyflwyniad i llawfer; Ymdopi â newyddion sy’n torri.
  • UXS-1004: History of Journal & Pub Sph. (20) (Semester 2)
    This course starts by presenting and critiquing Jurgen Habermas’ ideal of the public sphere. It then examines the various forces that he suggests constitute the public sphere’s corruption – namely the forces of propaganda, public relations, interest groups, neo-liberalism and market pressures. Taking a range of analytical perspectives (critical-theoretical, historical, political-economic and sociological) the rise of market-driven journalism will be examined, as will journalism’s struggle to establish its independence from the state and the state’s consequent attempts at manipulation and censorship. Throughout, a range of journalistic ideals, forms and practices, such as the radical press, objective journalism and investigative journalism, will be critically analysed and evaluated.
  • UXS-1017: Writing Across Media (20) (Semester 1)
    In "Creating Narratives" you will have the opportunity to investigate, and participate in, a variety of creative activites relating to the production of fiction. You will be able to develop an awareness of issues connected with the writing and consumption of fiction (e.g.creative, cultural and technological issues), and discover how cultural norms and assumptions, and individually writerly actions, influence fiction writing choice and fiction readerships. You will look at contemporary fiction writing around the world in a variety of media, and consider the role of publishers and readers in the creative process.
  • UXS-1024: Introduction to Screenwriting (20) (Semester 2)
    This module is an introduction to the basic underlying principles of screenwriting. It introduces students to key features of writing for film, and assesses them on their analyses of the screenplay form, plus the writing of a screenplay and treatment, and the pitching of an original concept. Students will primarily focus on writing for the short film format in order to facilitate their assessed short film screenplay assignment. Lectures will deliver various aspects of screenwriting, broken down week-by-week so that students can digest specific aspects of the craft of screenwriting. These include script formatting, style, structure, genre, plotting, characterisation and dialogue. Students will also learn how to present their work in the form of industry treatments and outlines, as well as techniques for outlining a concept orally, in the form of a film pitch. Students will be encouraged to develop professional writing habits and to give and receive critically constructive comment and advice. Seminar time will be spent discussing aspects of screenwriting, screened short films, as well as providing an opportunity for students to carry out creative screenwriting tasks in groups. Students will also be encouraged to critically peer evaluate the work of their cohort, and to analyse published screenplays, applying knowledge gained in the lecture. Students will also be required to read portions of screenplay extracts from published work prior to the seminars and lectures (uploaded to Blackboard) in order to analyse them during the seminars.
  • UXS-1055: Digital Communication (20) (Semester 1)
    The module looks includes a study of information theory in which students engage models for understanding concepts that include data, pattern, similarity of differences, information, structure, design, and communication. Students also explore the history and technology of the internet and the web, the communication models that have grown from them, and the relationship between these channels and the production, delivery, sharing and sale of information. The model includes a practical element in which students work with various software tools to engage with tools and technologies for information design/presentation; this includes background to the main types of information software available and some of the principles that inform them.
    or
    UXB-1055: Cyfathrebu Digidol (20) (Semester 1)
    Mae myfyrwyr yn ymgysylltu â modelau ar gyfer deall cysyniadau sy'n cynnwys data, patrwm, tebygrwydd o wahaniaethau, gwybodaeth, strwythur, dylunio, a chyfathrebu. Myfyrwyr yn archwilio hanes a thechnoleg y rhyngrwyd a'r we, y modelau cyfathrebu sydd wedi tyfu oddi wrthynt, a'r berthynas rhwng y sianelau a chynhyrchu, cyflwyno, rhannu a gwerthu gwybodaeth. Mae'r modiwl yn cynnwys elfen ymarferol y myfyrwyr yn ymgysylltu ag offer a thechnolegau gwybodaeth am ddylunio / cyflwyniad. Mae hyn yn cynnwys cefndir y prif fathau o feddalwedd gwybodaeth sydd ar gael a'r egwyddorion sy'n llywio eu dyluniad. The module looks includes a study of information theory in which students engage models for understanding concepts that include data, pattern, similarity of differences, information, structure, design, and communication. Students also explore the history and technology of the internet and the web, the communication models that have grown from them, and the relationship between these channels and the production, delivery, sharing and sale of information. The model includes a practical element in which students work with various software tools to engage with tools and technologies for information design/presentation; this includes background to the main types of information software available and some of the principles that inform them.
  • UXS-1062: Film Language (20) (Semester 2)
    This module provides students with a toolkit for the analysis of the moving image and aims to provide students with a technical vocabulary to enable them to analyse and to discuss how films communicate meaning. The individual elements of this toolkit are analysed in detail. Lectures cover topics such as: Mise-en-Scene, Editing, Camerawork, Sound, Lighting, and Style. Weekly screenings illustrate relevant aspects of film form. Films to be screened may include: A Man Escaped (Bresson, 1956), The Innocents (Clayton, 1961), City of God (Meirelles, 2002), Atonement (Wright, 2007), Bourne Ultimatum (Greengrass, 2007). The Red Shoes (Powell & Pressburger, 1948), and Moulin Rouge! (Luhrman, 2001)
    or
    UXC-1062: Iaith y Ffilm (20) (Semester 2)
    Mae'r cwrs hwn yn fodd o alluogi myfyrwyr i ddysgu hanfodion dadansoddi'r ddelwedd symydol. Bydd myfyrwyr ar y cwrs yn dysgu terminoleg dechnegol a fydd yn eu cynorthwyo i ddadansoddi a dehongli y modd y mae ffilm yn cyfathrebu ystyr. Bydd darlithoedd unigol yn trafod pynciau megis Mise-en-Scene, Montage, Gwaith Camera, Sain, Goleuo ac Arddull Weledol. Bydd dangosiadau o ffilmiau perthnasol yn cael eu cynnal yn wythnosol, er mwyn cyflwyno engrheifftiau o'r pynciau dan sylw. Bydd y ffilmiau a ddangosir yn cynnwys: A Man Escaped (Bresson, 1956), The Innocents (Clayton, 1961), City of God (Meirelles, 2002), Atonement (Wright, 2007), Bourne Ultimatum (Greengrass, 2007). The Red Shoes (Powell & Pressburger, 1948), ac Moulin Rouge! (Luhrman, 2001)
  • UXS-1063: Film History (20) (Semester 1)
    This module aims to provide students with an understanding of the link between film technologies, narratives, styles, genres, and subjects, and the societies in which film circulates. Lectures will introduce students to a range of important changes which have influenced the development of the filmic medium. The course will help students to situate the selected films in their cultural, , generic, and technological context. Lectures cover topics such as: Genre (Western, Screwball Comedy, Sport, Epic...), Narrative structure, Early Cinematic Milestones, The Introduction of Sound, Classical Hollywood Studio System, Asian Post-War Cinema, Italian Neo-Realism. Weekly screenings illustrate issues covered in lectures and associated readings, and will provide a case study for weekly workshops. Films/shorts to be screened may include: Le Voyage dans la Lune (Méliès, 1902), Man with a Movie Camera (Vertov, 1929), M (Lang, 1931), Blackmail (Hitchcock, 1929), Der Blaue Engel (Von Sternberg, 1930), Citizen Kane (Welles, 1941), Roma, Città Aperta (Rossellini, 1945), Rashomon (Kurosawa, 1950), Ladri di Biciclette (De Sica, 1948), À bout de soufflé (Godard, 1960), Memento (Nolan, 2000), There Will Be Blood (Anderson, 2007).
  • UXS-1065: Film Criticism (20) (Semester 1)
  • UXS-1066: American Television Drama (20) (Semester 2)
  • UXS-1090: Media Culture (20) (Semester 2)
    Media Culture focuses on media developments paying attention to traditional media forms such as film, TV, radio and print media and on to digital media forms. The essence of this module is to consider the impact of media on society and the ways in which they have altered or affected society. This requires us to consider: how media affect that way we live, how we as people interact and communicate, what we make, how we experience places, and more broadly how changes in media positively and negatively make a difference in the world. More formally, this module addresses: affordances of a range of media forms, interrelationships between technology and society, political economy, identity and community, production, dissemination and ownership, communication and interaction, privacy, and the ideological implications of networked mediated culture in a co-creative media age.
    or
    UXB-1043: Diwylliant y Cyfryngau (20) (Semester 2)
  • UXB-1120: Theatre Making (20) (Semester 1)
    What is performance? What are all the elements involved in a performance? The historical and cultural legacy of selected theatre traditions. How selected theatre traditions challenged and enhanced the notion of performance and the theatre.
    or
    UXS-1120: Theatre Making (20) (Semester 1)
    What is performance? What are all the elements involved in a performance? The historical and cultural legacy of selected theatre traditions. How selected theatre traditions challenged and enhanced the notion of performance and the theatre.
  • UXB-1403: Performing for Stage & Screen (20) (Semester 2)
    • Introduction to the key techniques and methods used for performing for the stage and screen • Exploring the psychological, physical and vocal understanding of actor’s training • Investigating the historical and cultural legacy of selected performing traditions.
    or
    UXS-1403: Performing for Stage & Screen (20) (Semester 2)
  • UXS-1800: Game Studies (20) (Semester 1)
  • UXS-1801: Game Design 1 (20) (Semester 2)

20 credits from:

  • LZF-1003: French for Beginners I (20) (Semester 1)
    The module is devised to suit 'ab initio' and post-GCSE students of French and focuses on the development of basic oral, aural and written communicative skills. The module involves an introduction to and [in the case of those with GCSE knowledge of the language] a revision of key areas of grammar (present and past tenses, the future and conditional tenses, nouns, adjectives, prepositions). Students will acquire general vocabulary and key expressions relating to self, family, daily routine, hobbies, likes and dislikes, in part through role-play situations. Using appropriate audio/visual aids, students will also be introduced to modern and contemporary French culture and society. Key texts: Action Grammaire! 3rd edition by Phil Turk & Geneviève García Vandaele (Hodder Education, 2006). The French Experience 1 Marie Therese Bougard, Daniele Bourdais (BBC Publications, 2003) Students are given the following advice about purchasing a dictionary: “You may be able to manage with a concise one (not a pocket dictionary), but you should consider a ‘proper’ translating dictionary such as the Collins-Robert or Oxford-Hachette, and learn to use it effectively and regularly.”
    or
    LCF-1003: Ffrangeg i Ddechreuwyr I (20) (Semester 1)
    Mae'r modiwl hwn yn addas ar gyfer dechreuwyr a myfyrwyr sydd wedi astudio Ffrangeg at TGAU. Mae'n canolbwyntio ar ddatblygu sgiliau llafar, gwrando ac ysgrifennu. Mae'r modiwl yn cynnwys cyflwyniad ac adolygu (yn achos rhai sydd eisoes wedi gwneud TGAU) y rhannau allweddol o ramadeg (yr amser presennol a'r gorffennol, y dyfodol a'r amodol, enwau, ansoddeiriau, arddodiaid). Bydd y myfyrwyr yn dysgu geirfa gyffredinol a'r ymadroddion allweddol sy'n ymwneud â'r hunan, y teulu, gweithgareddau bob-dydd, diddordebau, yr hyn maent yn ei hoffi/gasáu, a hynny yn rhannol trwy sefyllfaoedd chwarae rôl. Gan ddefnyddio'r cymhorthion sain/gweledol priodol, bydd y myfyrwyr yn cael eu cyflwyno i'r diwylliant a'r gymdeithas Ffrengig heddiw. Key texts The following textbooks are used: Action Grammaire! 3rd edition by Phil Turk & Geneviève García Vandaele (Hodder Education, 2006). The French Experience 1 Marie Therese Bougard, Daniele Bourdais (BBC Publications, 2003) Students are given the following advice about purchasing a dictionary: “You may be able to manage with a concise one (not a pocket dictionary), but you should consider a ‘proper’ translating dictionary such as the Collins-Robert or Oxford-Hachette, and learn to use it effectively and regularly.”
  • LZI-1003: Italian for Beginners I (20) (Semester 1)
    This is a module running in semester 1 aimed at absolute beginners. This module intends to make students become familiar with the basic structures of the language in order to enable them to express themselves, both orally and in writing, on very simple topics related to everyday life situations. The textbook adopted for this course is 'Spazio Italia 1' (Loescher Editore). This particular text has been selected for its communicative approach to language teaching which, in conjunction with a more traditional approach to grammar, allows students to speed up their progress in all the four essential language learning skills of speaking, reading, listening and writing. Key Texts: Diaco, Mimma Flavia & Maria Gloria Tommasini, Spazio Italia 1, (Torino: Loescher Editore, 2011). Diaco, Mimma Flavia & Maria Gloria Tommasini, Spazio Italia 3, (Torino: Loescher Editore, 2011). Webpages: www.rainews.it www.repubblica.it Any other learning resources: Lingu exercises
  • LZS-1003: Spanish Begin./Intermed. 1 (20) (Semester 1)
    This module is aimed at ab initio and post GCSE students of Spanish and focuses on the development of basic oral, aural and written communicative skills. The module involves an introduction to (and in the case of those with GCSE knowledge of the language), a revision of key areas of grammar (present and past tenses, the future and conditional tenses, nouns, adjectives, prepositions) and general vocabulary and key expressions relating to self, family, daily routine, hobbies, likes and dislikes and role-play situations. Through selected audio/visual aids, students will also be introduced to Spanish culture and society. Textbook: Kattán, Juan, and Angela Howkins, Spanish Grammar in Context, 3rd edn (New York: Routledge, 2014)
    or
    LCS-1003: Sbaeneg i Ddechreuwyr 1 (20) (Semester 1)
    Mae'r modiwl hwn wedi ei anelu at ddechreuwyr a myfyrwyr sydd wedi astudio TGAU Sbaeneg ac mae'n canolbwyntio ar ddatblygu sgiliau cyfathrebu llafar, clywedol ac ysgrifenedig sylfaenol. Mae'r modiwl yn cynnwys cyflwyniad ac (yn achos myfyrwyr sydd wedi astudio TGAU Sbaeneg) adolygiad o elfennau gramadegol allweddol (yr amser presennol a'r gorffennol, y dyfodol a'r amodol, enwau, ansoddeiriau, arddodiaid) a geirfa ac ymadroddion cyffredin sy'n ymwneud â'r hunan, y teulu, bywyd pob dydd, hobïau, hoff bethau a chas bethau a chwarae rôl. Trwy gymhorthion clywedol/gweledol cyflwynir myfyrwyr hefyd i ddiwylliant a chymdeithas Sbaenaidd. Llyfr cwrs: Kattán, Juan, and Angela Howkins, Spanish Grammar in Context, 3rd edn (New York: Routledge, 2014)
  • LZF-1004: French for Beginners II (20) (Semester 2)
    This module is aimed at all first year students who have completed French for Beginners 1. The module aims to develop the basic oral, aural and written communicative skills acquired in semester 1 in order to bring students up to and beyond a level of proficiency equivalent to 'A' level. Students apply the grammatical principles learned in semester 1 to extended pieces of writing and also focus on more complex grammatical structures. Aural communicative skills are developed through audio and video tape comprehension exercises and students are required to make individual presentations on more sophisticated topics. Key texts: Action Grammaire! 3rd edition by Phil Turk & Geneviève García Vandaele (Hodder Education, 2006). The French Experience 1 Marie Therese Bougard, Daniele Bourdais (BBC Publications, 2003) Students are given the following advice about purchasing a dictionary: “You may be able to manage with a concise one (not a pocket dictionary), but you should consider a ‘proper’ translating dictionary such as the Collins-Robert or Oxford-Hachette, and learn to use it effectively and regularly.”
    or
    LCF-1004: Ffrangeg i Ddechreuwyr II (20) (Semester 2)
    Bydd y modiwl hwn, a gynhelir yn yr ail semester, yn cynnwys pedair awr o oriau cyswllt yr wythnos. Mae wedi ei anelu at fyfyrwyr yn y flwyddyn gyntaf sydd wedi cwblhau Ffrangeg i Ddechreuwyr 1 a Myfyrwyr Canolradd 1. Nod y modiwl yw datblygu'r sgiliau sylfaenol mewn siarad, gwrando ac ysgrifennu a gafwyd yn semester 1 er mwyn dod â hwy i'r lefel hyfedredd sy'n cyfateb i Lefel A. Bydd y myfyrwyr yn defnyddio'r egwyddorion gramadeg a ddysgwyd yn semester 1 wrth ysgrifennu darnau mwy estynedig, gan ganolbwyntio ar gystrawennau mwy cymhleth (Y Goddefol, y Dibynnol a'r Gorchmynnol). O ran datblygu sgiliau llafar, bydd y myfyrwyr yn trafod mwy yn yr iaith darged. Caiff sgiliau gwrando eu datblygu hefyd trwy ymarferion tâp sain a fideo. Key texts The following textbooks are used: Action Grammaire! 3rd edition by Phil Turk & Geneviève García Vandaele (Hodder Education, 2006). The French Experience 1 Marie Therese Bougard, Daniele Bourdais (BBC Publications, 2003) Students are given the following advice about purchasing a dictionary: “You may be able to manage with a concise one (not a pocket dictionary), but you should consider a ‘proper’ translating dictionary such as the Collins-Robert or Oxford-Hachette, and learn to use it effectively and regularly.”
  • LZI-1004: Italian for Beginners II (20) (Semester 2)
    This module is aimed at all first year students who have completed Italian for Beginners 1. The module aims to develop the basic oral, aural and written communicative skills acquired in semester 1 in order to bring students up to and beyond a level of proficiency equivalent to 'A' level. Students apply the grammatical principles learned in semester 1 to extended pieces of writing and also focus on more complex grammatical structures. Aural communicative skills are developed through audio and video tape comprehension exercises and students are required to make individual presentations on more sophisticated topics. Key Texts: Diaco, Mimma Flavia & Maria Gloria Tommasini, Spazio Italia 1, (Torino: Loescher Editore, 2011). Diaco, Mimma Flavia & Maria Gloria Tommasini, Spazio Italia 3, (Torino: Loescher Editore, 2011). Webpages: www.rainews.it www.repubblica.it Any other learning resources: Lingu exercises
  • LZS-1004: Spanish Begin./Intermed. 2 (20) (Semester 2)
    This module is aimed at all first year students who have completed Spanish for Beginners and Intermediate Students 1. The module aims to develop the basic oral, aural and written communicative skills acquired in semester 1 in order to bring students up to and beyond a level of proficiency equivalent to 'A' level. Students apply the grammatical principles learned in semester 1 to extended pieces of writing and also focus on more complex grammatical structures. Aural communicative skills are developed through audio and video tape comprehension exercises and students are required to make individual presentations on more sophisticated topics. Textbook: Kattán, Juan, and Angela Howkins, Spanish Grammar in Context, 3rd edn (New York: Routledge, 2014)
  • QXL-1112: Language and Culture (20) (Semester 2)
    1. the relationship between language, culture and thought processes, 2. the relationship between language and identity, 3. the structures of bilingual societies, 4. the different manifestations of multilingualism, particularly in relation to the concepts of bilingualism and diglossia, 5. the cultural, political, and anthropological issues surrounding minority languages & language policy.
  • LXE-1600: Cultures in Context (20) (Semester 2)
  • LXE-1700: History in Context (20) (Semester 1)
  • Students with A-Levels in any of the above languages must take the intermediate options, e.g. LZ..1001/1002 (if language modules are chosen)

Year 2 Modules

Compulsory Modules

Semester 1

  • LZG-2040: Gegenwartssprache I (40) Core
    This module deepens students' command of the written language through translation, text and essay work. Emphasis will be placed on a secure grasp of structures and sensitivity to register. Oral proficiency will be fostered through discussions of contemporary issues in the German-speaking world with students' presentations on various topics. In order to prepare students for their year abroad, key topics will be covered including aspects of business German, the press and media, university life in Germany and Austria, and general 'Landeskunde'. Students will also be required to read and review two short novels in order to expand their vocabulary and improve their grasp of grammatical structures.

Semester 2

  • LZG-2040: Gegenwartssprache I
    This module deepens students' command of the written language through translation, text and essay work. Emphasis will be placed on a secure grasp of structures and sensitivity to register. Oral proficiency will be fostered through discussions of contemporary issues in the German-speaking world with students' presentations on various topics. In order to prepare students for their year abroad, key topics will be covered including aspects of business German, the press and media, university life in Germany and Austria, and general 'Landeskunde'. Students will also be required to read and review two short novels in order to expand their vocabulary and improve their grasp of grammatical structures.

Optional Modules

60 credits from:

  • UXS-2025: Stanley Kubrick: Auteur (20) (Semester 1)
    Topics that will be covered in this module include all of Kubrick’s films, as well as how these intersect with events such as World War One, the Holocaust, the Cold War and the Vietnam War and such issues as science, technology, history, race, violence, gender, ethnicity, sexuality and war.
  • UXS-2033: Practical Digital Journalism (20) (Semester 2)
    The course will begin with an introduction to on-line journalism, the influence of new digital technology on journalism and its implications for traditional forms of media. We will also discuss the ethical and legal issues involved in producing on-line content. You will be taught a range of skills including how gather news on-line, write and produce visual and audio content for digital news platforms and how to ensure that content reaches a wide audience. You will be expected to put these skills into practice and create your own digital news platform, create content from that platform and distribute that content to the widest possible audience.
  • UXS-2038: Journalism and Risk (20) (Semester 1)
    This course starts by presenting and critiquing the concept of risk, and the development of the field of risk communication. It then examines two key theorists of the 'risk society', namely Ulrich Beck and Anthony Giddens, to explore sociological theoretical foundations that explain inter-relationships of risk, trust, expertise and mass-mediated communication. Building on this theoretical lens, it then moves to examine journalism, risk and trust, looking at patterns of risk reporting in different aspects of the press. In-depth analysis of specific risk issues and their journalistic communication are examined, ranging from health risks like 'mad cow' disease to security risks like terrorism.
  • UXS-2041: Games and Virtual Environments (20) (Semester 2)
    In 'Games and Virtual Environments' you will investigate the lively contemporary field of computer/video games and virtual worlds. During the module you will define, discuss and analyse various types of games and virtual environments. You will investigate issues surrounding games narrative and ludology (the theory and philosophy of gaming) as well as look at various video game genres (e.g. 1st person shooters, adventures, civilisation and god games; online, platform and massively multiplayer games). You will also examine the social and psychological effects of playing computer games and learn to evaluate realistically the implications of game consumption with respect to education and entertainment. By the end of this module, you will have developed a broad theoretical and critical background to the analysis of games and virtual environments, and you will be familiar with empirical research methods used to evaluate consumer needs and behaviour.
  • UXS-2050: Race & Gender (20) (Semester 2)
    Topics to be looked at will include, Senegalese Cinema, representing prostitution, women in photography, race and gender in performance art, representing women on film, women and genre, Women and horror, women and action, Australian Visual Culture, Aboriginal female film makers, remembering the slave trade, post-colonialism, neo-colonialism and representation, how we define ‘white’.
  • UXS-2052: Radio: Theory and Practice (20) (Semester 1)
    The lectures will initially focus on the history of radio as a specific medium, with a particular focus on Wales and the UK, as well as a broader international perspective. Different radio production methods will then be examined, and subsequently different programme genres, with specific examples being studied. The theoretical aspects of the module culminate in a broad conceptual review of the nature of the medium and how this is changing in the digital age. The practical workshops will run concurrently, with the students revising and developing generic production skills at the beginning of the course, before planning, researching and producing their own individual productions. These will be informed by the study of production methods, genres and programmes introduced in the lectures.
    or
    UXC-2052: Radio Theori ac Ymarfer (20) (Semester 1)
    Bydd y darlithoedd yn canolbwyntio yn gyntaf ar hanes radio fel cyfrwng penodol, gyda sylw arbennig i Gymru a’r Deyrnas Unedig, yn ogystal â phersbectif rhyngwladol ehangach. Nesaf, fe archwilir amryw o ddulliau cynhyrchu radio, ac yna gwahanol fathau o raglenni radio, gan ddadansoddi enghreifftiau penodol. Bydd agweddau damcaniaethol y modiwl yn cael eu crynhoi yn derfynol gydag arolwg cysyniadol eang o natur y cyfrwng a sut mae hyn yn newid yn yr oes ddigidol. Bydd y gweithdai ymarferol yn cyd-redeg â’r darlithoedd, gyda’r myfyrwyr yn datblygu eu sgiliau cynhyrchu cyffredinol cyn iddynt gynllunio, ymchwilio a chreu cynyrchiadau unigol. Bydd yr astudiaeth o ddulliau cynhyrchu, mathau o raglenni a rhaglenni penodol yn y darlithoedd o gymorth i’r myfyrwyr gyda’r gwaith ymarferol.
  • UXS-2055: Privacy and the Media (20) (Semester 1)
    Week 1 – Introduction: why privacy matters Week 2 – Philosophical/theoretical contexts Week 3 – Journalism Week 3 – Telecommunications, transparency and the Snowden leaks Week 4 – Behavioural advertising Week 5 – Big data and sentiment analysis Week 6 – The direction of Google, search and personal assistants Week 7 – Social media Week 8 – Gaming and biometric media Week 9 – Wearable media Week 10 – Telekinetic media and Google Glass Week 11 – Wrap-up: what do media developments tell us about privacy?
  • UXS-2058: Writing for Film & Television (20) (Semester 2)
    This module is designed to develop knowledge and skills in writing for film, and introduces key stylistic and textual characteristics of writing for television. The module provides an overview of television writing, separated into television drama and the situation comedy, and outlines the specific demands of these formats for screenwriters. Students are then assessed on their own original television concept in the form of a treatment and screenplay extract, plus a short critical and reflective essay. The course then goes on to present advanced theories of writing for film - developing concepts of characterisation, structure, genre, visual storytelling and the use of dialogue and action. Students will be encouraged to engage with formal screenwriting concepts such as the three-act structure, genre tropes, active protagonists and plot resolutions. However, they will also be expected to interrogate and challenge these elements of screenwriting craft, and are expected to display this engagement in their assessed work. Students will be assessed on their own original film concept in the form of a treatment and screenplay extract (for a short film or feature film), plus a critical and reflective essay. Lectures will deliver various features of writing for television and film, using screenings as contextual support material. Lectures will initially present some basic concepts of screenwriting such as script formatting, style, structure, genre, plotting, characterisation and dialogue, before moving on to deal specifically with television drama, situation comedy, the short film and the feature film. Seminar time will be spent discussing various aspects of screenwriting outlined in the lectures. Students will be encouraged to engage with, and challenge, elements of the craft of screenwriting, and to carry out creative screenwriting tasks in groups. Students will also critically peer evaluate the work of their cohort, and analyse published screenplays, applying knowledge gained in the lectures. Students will be required to develop professional writing habits and to give and receive critically constructive comment and advice. Proposed films and television programmes to be screened include: The Sopranos (Chase, 1999-2007), The Wire (Simon, 2002-08), Red Riding (Jarrold, 2009), The Singing Detective (Potter, 1986), The Prisoner (McGoohan, 1967-68), Oz (Fontana, 1997-2003), Twin Peaks (Frost/Lynch, 1990-91), The IT Crowd (Linehan, 2006- ), Spaced (Wright, 1999-2001), The Office (Gervais/Merchant, 2001-3), Father Ted (Linehan, 1995-8). The Third Man (Reed, 1949), Brief Encounter (Lean, 1945), The Devil¿s Backbone (Del Toro, 2001), Intacto (Fresnadillo, 2001), Hunger (McQueen, 2008), Dead Man's Shoes (Meadows, 2004), The Sea Inside (Amenábar, 2004), The White Ribbon (Haneke, 2009), Festen (Vinterberg, 1998), Uzak (Ceylan, 2002), Sympathy for Mr Vengeance (Park, 2002), Let the Right One In (Alfredson, 2008), The Road (Hillcoat, 2009), Sexy Beast (Glazer, 2000), No Country for Old Men (Coen, 2007)
  • UXS-2059: Understanding Documentary (20) (Semester 1)
    This course will look at the development of documentary film, attempting to place important developments within a theoretical context. The course will begin by looking at the way in which the early pioneers of documentary film emerged in the 1920s, and seek to understand the contributions of John Grierson, Robert Flaherty and Dziga Vertov, and the relationship between their work. This will be followed by an examination of the emergence of Direct Cinema and Cinema Verité during the 1960s, and the challenges faced by those attempting to work within observational documentary. The rejection of the purely observational mode of documentary, and the rise of the participatory film-maker will follow, leading on to an examination of reflexive documentaries, the role of dramatisation within documentary film, drama-documentary and docudrama. The final part of the course will look at the influence of new technology upon documentary film, analysing the influence of both computer generated imagery and animation upon documentary film. Specific attention will be paid to the work of film-makers such as Albert and David Maysles, DA Pennebaker, Nick Broomfield, Molly Dineen, Errol Morris, and Kevin MacDonald among others.
    or
    UXC-2046: Y Ffilm ddogfen:Theori (20) (Semester 1)
    Bydd y cwrs hwn yn edrych ar ddatblygiad ffilmiau dogfen gan geisio gosod datblygiadau pwysig mewn cyd-destun damcaniaethol. Caiff hanes y ffilm ddogfen ei drafod yng nghyd-destun y cwestiynnau syniadaethol a ddilynodd o esblygiad gwahanol fathau o ffilmiau dogfen. Bydd myfyrwyr ar y cwrs yn edrych ar amrediad o ffilmiau, o'r 1920au hyd heddiw, ond bydd mwyafrif y ffilmiau a fydd yn cael eu harchwilio yn rhai cyfoes. Bydd gofyn i'r myfyrwyr ddadansoddi'r ffilmiau, gan gyfeirio at theori dogfen wedi ei ysgrifennu gan amrywiaeth o awduron, gan gynnwys: John Grierson, Dziga Vertov, Paul Rotha, Bill Nichols, Stella Bruzzi, John Corner, a Paul Wells, ymhlith eraill.
  • UXS-2062: Film Distribution & Marketing (20) (Semester 1)
  • UXS-2064: Film Theory (20) (Semester 2)
  • UXS-2076: Global News Agenda (20) (Semester 2)
    Topics that this module will discuss include: the CNN effect; manipulating global news agendas through public diplomacy; war, perception management and bearing witness through global media forms; reporting distant suffering; satellite news wars; the rise of satellite news in the Middle East and the possible rise of an Arab public sphere; and the impact of global news forms on censorship and resistance.
  • UXS-2078: Writing Genre Fiction (20) (Semester 2)
    Students will approach genre fiction from a creative & critical perspective, examining a particular genre across the semester as a series of case studies (e.g., speculative fiction). They will engage in reading and analyzing relevant texts, applying theory and understanding gained to their own creative project.
  • UXS-2099: Research and Methods (20) (Semester 2)
    Introduction; choosing a research topic Writing a research proposal Research Paradigms: Positivism vs Interpretivism Working with texts 1: Textual analysis Working with texts 2: Content analysis Fieldwork 1: Questionnaires, interviews and focus groups Fieldwork 2: Ethnography and participant observation Case study approaches Quantitative and qualitative sampling issues Research Ethics Doing a literature review; writing a dissertation
  • UXS-2400: Contemporary Theatre Practice (20) (Semester 2) or
    UXB-2400: Contemporary Theatre Practice (20) (Semester 2)
    Introduce theoretical and practical research in Contemporary Theatre Practice Explore advance theatre making methods to create original creative work Practice Workshop delivery and how to evaluate practice
  • UXS-2401: Practical Journalism: ELD (20) (Semester 1)
    The course will teach students media law and how to report on the workings of government. They will gain practical experience in reporting from courts, inquests and council meetings. They will also be taught how to write and research news and feature articles, interviewing techniques, and how to cover running stories and elections.
    or
    UXC-2401: Newyddiaduraeth Ymarferol: MCD (20) (Semester 1)
    Bydd y modiwl yn dysgu myfyrwyr am gyfraith y cyfryngau a sut i ohebu am brosesau'r llywodraeth. Byddant yn cael profiad ymarferol o ohebu am achosion llys, cwestau a chyfarfodydd cyngor. Byddant hefyd yn dysgu sut i ymchwilio ac ysgrifennu erthyglau newyddion ac erthyglau nodwedd, technegau cyfweld a sut i ymdrin â straeon parhaol ac etholiadau.
  • UXB-2408: Site Specific Performance (20) (Semester 1)
    Introduction to site specific performances, conventions and performance practice Exploring performance in a non-theatre building environment The historical and cultural legacy of selected performing traditions.
    or
    UXS-2408: Site Specific Performance (20) (Semester 1)
    Introduction to site specific performances, conventions and performance practice Exploring performance in a non-theatre building environment The historical and cultural legacy of selected performing traditions.
  • UXS-2412: Playable Fiction (20) (Semester 2)
    The creative writer is constantly challenged by the evolution of literary form, striving to create fresh and original narratives that depart from the conventional. Modernism, postmodernism, and now digital media are all avenues of exploration and experimentation. This module focuses on the latter domain, as writers approach narrative through the creation of games. Story-games, such as hypertexts, interactive fictions, and visual novels, necessitate unconventional, and even unnatural, structures and perspectives. By creating playable narratives, students on this course will open their writing up to new expressions, forms, and genres. Students will discuss and explore critical and creative responses to these texts, applying new techniques and awareness to their creative writing practice.

20 credits from:

  • LXG-2008: The German Film (20) (Semester 1)
    This module will examine a selection of nine German films reflecting key themes in German cinema, from its beginnings to the present day. Students will be provided with an introduction to the history of German cinema, and will develop a detailed knowledge of the films examined both as historical documents and as cinematic texts. Whilst certain attention will be paid to cinematographic devices and the different movements associated with German cinema, the module will also explore the chosen films in a far wider context, examining the social and historical events surrounding the creation of the films, thus broadening students' knowledge of German history and culture. Primary Sources: Films: Das Cabinet des Dr Caligari, dir. by Robert Wiene (1919) M: Eine Stadt sucht einen Mörder, dir. by Fritz Lang (1931) Triumph des Willens, dir. by Leni Riefenstahl (1935) Angst essen Seele auf, dir. by Rainer Werner Fassbinder (1973) Der Himmel über Berlin, dir. by Wim Wenders (1987) Lola rennt, dir. by Tom Tykwer (1998) Good Bye Lenin!, dir. by Wolfgang Becker (2003) Das Leben der Anderen, dir. by Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck (2006) Recommended Reading Bergfelder, Tim, et al., The German Cinema Book (London: BFI, 2002) Cooke, Paul, German Expressionist Films (Harpenden: Pocket Essentials, 2002) Elsaesser, T., New German Cinema: A History (New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 1989) Ginsberg, T. and K.M. Thompson (eds), Perspectives on German Cinema (New York: G.K. Hall, 1996) Hake, Sabine, German National Cinema (London: Routledge, 2002) Brockmann, Stephen, A Critical History of German Film (Rochester, NY: Camden House, 2010).
  • LXG-2009: Dutch I (20) (Semester 1)
    An introduction to contemporary Dutch language, presenting students with a foundation knowledge of modern Dutch in both its spoken and written form. Set Text Gerdi Quist et al., Routledge Intensive Dutch Course (New York: Routledge, 2006) Websites: SMLC offers a link list for all language students that covers the most important resources (newspapers, TV channels, online grammar and dictionaries, etc.) in the language(s) that they study: http://www.bangor.ac.uk/ml/links-dutch.php.en
  • LXG-2011: Dutch II (20) (Semester 2)
    The module builds on the foundation knowledge gained in Dutch I [LXG2009] and equips students with a sound basis in contemporary Dutch. Set Text Gerdi Quist et al., Routledge Intensive Dutch Course (New York: Routledge, 2006) Websites: SMLC offers a link list for all language students that covers the most important resources (newspapers, TV channels, online grammar and dictionaries, etc.) in the language(s) that they study: http://www.bangor.ac.uk/ml/links-dutch.php.en
  • LXG-2013: The Divided Germany (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    A selection of post-1945 short stories, contemporary film material and historical documents will form the basis of this course. It will familiarise students with the emergence of a divided Germany, and examine the dominant cultural and ideological trends in both East and West following the end of the Second World War. Students will be introduced to the work of some of the leading names in post-war German writing, and will undertake close analysis of texts and films, in order to examine the relationship between historical events and their depiction within the sphere of fiction. Set Texts Manfred Durzak, Die deutsche Kurzgeschichte der Gegenwart. Autorenporträts. Werkstattgespräche. Interpretationen, 3rd edn (Würzburg: Königshausen & Neumann, 2002) John Heath, ‘“Great Upheavals Make for Great Opportunities”: A Short Story by Stefan Heym with Commentary’, The Modern Language Review, 104 (October, 2009), 1063-1080. Ulrich Plenzdorf, Die neuen Leiden des jungen W. (FaM: Suhrkamp, 1976) Peter Schneider, Lenz. Eine Erzählung (Cologne: Kiepenheuer & Witsch, 2008) Films: Ich war neunzehn, dir. by Konrad Wolf (DEFA, 1968) Die Legende von Paul und Paula, dir. by Heiner Carow (DEFA, 1973) Die Ehe der Maria Braun, dir. by Rainer Werner Fassbinder (DVD Video, 1978) Recommended Reading Mary Fulbrook, The Two Germanies, 1945-1990 (Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1992) or Mary Fulbrook, German National Identity after the Holocaust. The Myth of German National Identity after the Holocaust (Malden, MA: Blackwell, 1999) or Mary Fulbrook, A Concise History of Germany (Cambridge, NY: Cambridge University Press, 2004) Mary Fulbrook and Andrew I. Port (eds), Becoming East Germans: Socialist Structures and Sensibilities After Hitler (New York: Berghahn, 2013) Ulrich Mählert, Kleine Geschichte der DDR (Munich: Beck, 1999 Nick Thomas, Protest Movements in 1960s West Germany: A Social History of Dissent and Democracy (Oxford, NY: Berg, 2003)

Year 4 Modules

Compulsory Modules

Semester 1

  • LZG-3030: Gegenwartssprache II (30) Core
    This 30 credit module running throughout the year promotes appropriate use of style and register in all written and oral work and ensures that students can deal with variations in register and idiomatic expression in a confident and accurate manner. Through exposure to selected texts, complex grammatical structures and audiovisual materials, students acquire reading, writing, aural and oral skills which match the required standard of final year linguists. Key Texts Davies, Winifred V. (1997) Essay-writing in German – A students’ guide, Manchester and New York: Manchester University Press. Clemmetson, Christa and Rod Hare (1998) Aufsatz! 2000 : German language essay writing, London : Hodder & Stoughton. Websites SMLC offers a link list for all language students that covers the most important resources (newspapers, TV channels, online grammar and dictionaries, etc.) in the language(s) that they study: http://www.bangor.ac.uk/ml/links-german.php.en (German online resources) http://www.bangor.ac.uk/ml/links-welsh.php.en (Welsh medium resources) Additionally, students are encouraged to consult: English-German Context Dictionary: http://www.linguee.com/ Other Learning Resources Students are provided with separate dossiers that contain all the necessary materials for their translation, applied language and conversation classes at the beginning of each semester.

Semester 2

  • LZG-3030: Gegenwartssprache II
    This 30 credit module running throughout the year promotes appropriate use of style and register in all written and oral work and ensures that students can deal with variations in register and idiomatic expression in a confident and accurate manner. Through exposure to selected texts, complex grammatical structures and audiovisual materials, students acquire reading, writing, aural and oral skills which match the required standard of final year linguists. Key Texts Davies, Winifred V. (1997) Essay-writing in German – A students’ guide, Manchester and New York: Manchester University Press. Clemmetson, Christa and Rod Hare (1998) Aufsatz! 2000 : German language essay writing, London : Hodder & Stoughton. Websites SMLC offers a link list for all language students that covers the most important resources (newspapers, TV channels, online grammar and dictionaries, etc.) in the language(s) that they study: http://www.bangor.ac.uk/ml/links-german.php.en (German online resources) http://www.bangor.ac.uk/ml/links-welsh.php.en (Welsh medium resources) Additionally, students are encouraged to consult: English-German Context Dictionary: http://www.linguee.com/ Other Learning Resources Students are provided with separate dossiers that contain all the necessary materials for their translation, applied language and conversation classes at the beginning of each semester.

Optional Modules

60 credits from:

  • UXS-3025: Stanley Kubrick: Auteur (20) (Semester 1)
    The enigmatic Stanley Kubrick was one of the most well-known filmmakers of the twentieth century. Although not prolific, his work was widely admired both by critics and mass audiences. Kubrick's films also provide a prism through which we can view the major events of the twentieth century including World War One, the Holocaust, the Cold War and the Vietnam War. In doing so, his films provide an opportunity to explore the key themes of science, technology, history, race, violence, gender, ethnicity, sexuality and war. Teaching is by means of a two-hour seminar per week. In addition, students are required to organise small-group viewing of designated films per week.
  • UXS-3036: E-Publishing (20) (Semester 2)
    In `E-Publishing' you will have the opportunity to investigate the nature of electronic publishing and electronically published materials, looking at the range, type and style of e-published materials (eg. websites, blogs, podcasts, streamed video and audio, e-books). You will be able to develop an awareness of issues connected with e-publishing (ie. Textual, creative, cultural and technological issues), and discover how cultural norms and assumptions influence e-publishing choice and readership. You will look at global versus national or regional forms of electronic publishing and e-publishing genre. This module will include some master-classes/workshops from the realms of e-publishing.
  • UXS-3038: Journalism and Risk (20) (Semester 1)
    This course starts by presenting and critiquing the concept of risk, and the development of the field of risk communication. It then examines two key theorists of the 'risk society', namely Ulrich Beck and Anthony Giddens, to explore sociological theoretical foundations that explain inter-relationships of risk, trust, expertise and mass-mediated communication. Building on this theoretical lens, it then moves to examine journalism, risk and trust, looking at patterns of risk reporting in different aspects of the press. In-depth analysis of specific risk issues and their journalistic communication are examined, ranging from health risks like 'mad cow' disease to security risks like terrorism.
  • UXS-3041: Games and Virtual Environments (20) (Semester 2)
    In `Advanced Games', you will plot out a project relating to a new product for the computer game industry. This will involve some sense of market profiling and potential, and a discussion of where your particular product might be used. In class, you will discuss and evaluate aspects of game design. By the conclusion of the module you will have researched, outlined and illustrated your product, provided a detailed creative blueprint for its shape and form, and shown an awareness of how it contributes to, or advances, the chosen genre.
  • UXS-3049: Advanced Screenwriting (20) (Semester 1)
    Lectures will deliver various discourses on the history and development of adaptations, and interrogate the relationship of various media to film. Lectures will also examine a range of concepts related to adaptation, including authorship, visual storytelling, narratology and intertextuality. These concepts will then be applied to film adaptations screened in the same week. Seminar time will be spent discussing theories of adaptation, and also provide an opportunity for students to carry out creative adaptation tasks in groups, such as conceiving short film ideas, and developing adaptations from non-literary sources, such as music and photography, and other visual arts. Students will need to demonstrate an understanding of key theories related to the comparative textual analysis of an adaptation to its source material in assessed essays. However, the module is heavily focused on the creative act and process of adaptation, and offers the chance for students to radically imagine pre-existing texts in other media in their assessed coursework. Proposed films to be screened include: Adaptation (Jonze, 2002), Throne of Blood (Kurosawa, 1957), American Psycho (Harron, 2000), The Innocents (Clayton, 1961), The Others (Amenábar, 2001), The Watchmen (Snyder, 2009), Don't Look Now (Roeg, 1973), The Shining (Kubrick, 1980), Apocalypse Now (Coppola, 1979), Stalker (Tarkovsky, 1979), Zatoichi (Kitano, 2003), Where the Wild Things Are (Jonze, 2009), La Jetée (Marker, 1962), 12 Monkeys (Gilliam, 1995), Naked Lunch (Cronenberg, 1991), A Cock & Bull Story (Winterbottom, 2005), Elephant (Clarke, 1989), Elephant (Van Sant, 2003), The Five Obstructions (Leth/Von Trier, 2003).
  • UXS-3050: Race & Gender (20) (Semester 2)
    Topics to be looked at will include, Senegalese Cinema, women in photography, race and gender in performance art, representing women on film, women and genre, Women and horror, women and action, Australian Visual Culture, Aboriginal female film makers, remembering the slave trade, post-colonialism, neo-colonialism and representation, how we define `white'.
  • UXS-3055: Privacy and the Media (20) (Semester 1)
    Week 1 – Introduction: why privacy matters Week 2 – Philosophical/theoretical contexts Week 3 – Journalism Week 3 – Telecommunications, transparency and the Snowden leaks Week 4 – Behavioural advertising Week 5 – Big data and sentiment analysis Week 6 – The direction of Google, search and personal assistants Week 7 – Social media Week 8 – Gaming and biometric media Week 9 – Wearable media Week 10 – Telekinetic media and Google Glass Week 11 – Wrap-up: what do media developments tell us about privacy?
  • UXS-3062: Film Distribution & Marketing (20) (Semester 1)
  • UXS-3076: Global News Agenda (20) (Semester 2)
    Topics that this module will discuss include: the CNN effect; manipulating global news agendas through public diplomacy; war, perception management and bearing witness through global media forms; reporting distant suffering; satellite news wars; the rise of satellite news in the Middle East and the possible rise of an Arab public sphere; and the impact of global news forms on censorship and resistance.
  • UXS-3078: Writing Genre Fiction (20) (Semester 2)
    Students will approach genre fiction from a creative & critical perspective, examining a particular genre across the semester as a series of case studies (e.g., speculative fiction). They will engage in reading and analyzing relevant texts, applying theory and understanding gained to their own creative project.
  • UXS-3090: Dissertation (40) (Semester 1 + 2)
    This module is a period of supervised research culminating in the submission of a 10,000-word dissertation worth 40 credits. In week six students will make a 10 minute oral presentation on the progress of their research to date. Students wishing to produce a piece of practice-based audio-visual research (e.g. a fiction or non-fiction television, film or radio piece) must normally register for UXS 3091 (Final Year Group Project), although there is opportunity to employ creative methodologies so for practice-based students to utilise their learning and skills in a research context.
    or
    UXC-3090: Ast'th Unigol neu Draethawd (40) (Semester 1 + 2)
    Mae'r modiwl hwn yn datblygu ar yr hyn a astudiwyd yn y modiwl UXS 2092 yn yr ail flwyddyn. Cyfnod o ymchwil dan oruchwyliaeth fydd yn arwain at gyflwyno traethawd hir 10,000 o eiriau gwerth 40 credyd yw'r modiwl hwn. Yn wythnos 6, bydd gofyn i fyfyrwyr roi cyflwyniad llafar 10 munud ar hynt eu hymchwil hyd yma. Fel rheol, dylai myfyrwyr sydd eisiau gwneud ymchwil clyweledol yn seiliedig ar ymarfer (e.e. darn teledu, ffilm neu radio ffuglen neu ffeithiol) gofrestru ar UXS 3091 (project grŵp blwyddyn olaf) yn lle’r modiwl hwn, er bod cyfle i ddefnyddio methodolegau creadigol er mwyn i fyfyrwyr ar gyrsiau sy'n seiliedig ar ymarfer allu defnyddio eu dysgu a'u sgiliau mewn cyd-destun ymchwil. Ni ellir cymryd y modiwl hwn gyda UXS 3090. Mae'n rhaid ichi fod wedi astudio UXS 2099 NEU UXS 2092 er mwyn dilyn y modiwl hwn.
  • UXS-3092: Dissertation - Action Research (40) (Semester 1 + 2)
  • UXB-3400: Contemporary Theatre Practice (20) (Semester 2)
    Introduce theoretical and practical research in Contemporary Theatre Practice Explore advance theatre making methods to create original creative work Practice Workshop delivery and how to evaluate practice
    or
    UXS-3400: Contemporary Theatre Practice (20) (Semester 2)
  • UXC-3401: Newyddiaduraeth Ymarferol: MCD (20) (Semester 1)
    Bydd y modiwl yn dysgu myfyrwyr am gyfraith y cyfryngau a sut i ohebu am brosesau'r llywodraeth. Byddant yn cael profiad ymarferol o ohebu am achosion llys, cwestau a chyfarfodydd cyngor. Byddant hefyd yn dysgu sut i ymchwilio ac ysgrifennu erthyglau newyddion ac erthyglau nodwedd, technegau cyfweld a sut i ymdrin â straeon parhaol ac etholiadau.
    or
    UXS-3401: Practical Journalism: ELD (20) (Semester 1)
    The course will teach students media law and how to report on the workings of government. They will gain practical experience in reporting from courts, inquests and council meetings. They will also be taught how to write and research news and feature articles, interviewing techniques, and how to cover running stories and elections.
  • UXB-3408: Site-Specific Performance (20) (Semester 1)
    Introduction to site specific performances, conventions and performance practice Exploring performance in a non-theatre building environment The historical and cultural legacy of selected performing traditions.
    or
    UXS-3408: Site-Specific Performance (20) (Semester 1)
    Introduction to site specific performances, conventions and performance practice Exploring performance in a non-theatre building environment The historical and cultural legacy of selected performing traditions.
  • UXS-3412: Playable Fiction (20) (Semester 2)
    The creative writer is constantly challenged by the evolution of literary form, striving to create fresh and original narratives that depart from the conventional. Modernism, postmodernism, and now digital media are all avenues of exploration and experimentation. This module focuses on the latter domain, as writers approach narrative through the creation of games. Story-games, such as hypertexts, interactive fictions, and visual novels, necessitate unconventional, and even unnatural, structures and perspectives. By creating playable narratives, students on this course will open their writing up to new expressions, forms, and genres. Students will discuss and explore critical and creative responses to these texts, applying new techniques and awareness to their creative writing practice.

30 credits from:

  • LXG-3013: Women in Germany (20) (Semester 1)
    This course will examine the development of the Women’s Movement in Germany from the early nineteenth century to the present day, based upon historical and other cultural material. Issues covered include the struggle for equality in the home, the right to work and vote, the role of women in World War I and the National Socialist regime, the treatment of women in the GDR, and the rise of twentieth century feminism. Feminist theory and literary and film material will be used to ground discussions of the historical events. Recommended Reading Ute Frevert, Women in German History: From Bourgeois Emancipation to Sexual Liberation (New York: Berg, 1989) Eva Kolinsky, Women in Contemporary Germany: Life, Work, and Politics (New York: Berg, 1993) Jo Catling (ed.), A History of Women’s Writing in Germany, Austria and Switzerland (Cambridge, New York: Cambridge University Press, 2000) Other Learning Resources Course reader will be provided at the beginning of term
  • LXG-3016: East Germany and its Legacy (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    During this course you will be introduced to life in the German Democratic Republic (1949-89). You will study an outline history of the country, in order to analyse the rise and fall of Germany's first, and only, socialist experiment. You will explore the nature of everyday life and, in particular, the way in which the State sought to control every aspect of its citizens' existence. Finally, you will analyse the so-called Wende and the different ways in which the GDR has been categorised since 1989. Four literary texts will also be studied. These reflect individual experience within the GDR. Required reading Stephan Heym, Fünf Tage im Juni (FaM: Fischer, 1990) Volker Braun, Unvollendete Geschichte (FaM: Suhrkamp, 1979) Christoph Hein, Der Tangospieler (Berlin: Aufbau, 1999) Christa Wolf, Der geteilte Himmel (Munich: DTV, 2010)
  • LXE-3101: Approaching Translation (10) (Semester 2)
    This module aims to further develop and consolidate translation skills students have acquired in their language courses. By approaching translation as a process, it examines translation at different textual levels, from the lexico-grammatical level such as words and grammar, to the textual-pragmatic level such as cohesion, register and text types. It provides students with a framework to reflect on the translational difficulties in their chosen language pairs and explore strategies and their implications. Key texts Baker, Mona. In Other Words: A Coursebook on Translation, 2nd edition (London: Routledge, 2011). Hatim, Basil and Munday, Jeremy. Translation: an Advanced Resource Book (London: Routledge, 2004). Students will also require language specific resources such as a bilingual and monolingual dictionaries.
    or
    LCE-3101: Trin a Thrafod Cyfieithu (10) (Semester 2)
    Bwriad y modiwl hwn yw datblygu ac atgyfnerthu ymhellach sgiliau cyfieithu a enillwyd gan fyfyrwyr yn eu cyrsiau iaith. Trwy ystyried cyfieithu fel proses, mae'n craffu ar gyfieithu ar wahanol lefelau testunol, o lefel geiriau a gramadeg, i'r lefel destunol a phragmataidd sy'n ystyried cydlyniad, cywair a mathau o destun. Mae'n rhoi fframwaith i'r myfyrwyr i ystyried yr anawsterau cyfieithu yn y parau iaith a ddewiswyd ganddynt ac i ymchwilio i strategaethau a'u goblygiadau. Key texts Baker, Mona. In Other Words: A Coursebook on Translation, 2nd edition (London: Routledge, 2011). Hatim, Basil and Munday, Jeremy. Translation: an Advanced Resource Book (London: Routledge, 2004). Students will also require language specific resources such as a bilingual and monolingual dictionaries.
  • LXE-3102: Culture and the Body (10) (Semester 1)
  • LZG-3110: Joint Hon. German Dissertation (10) (Semester 1 + 2)
    This module will give students the opportunity of working on something as part of their degree course which is not already a specific component of the syllabus and develop independent study skills and research skills during their semester abroad. Through this course students will enhance their study skills and academic writing techniques. This module is intended as a foundation for the kind of writing requested at postgraduate level.
    or
    LCG-3110: Traethawd hir Almaeneg (CA) (10) (Semester 1 + 2)
    Bydd y modiwl hwn yn rhoi profiad i fyfyrwyr o weithio fel rhan o'u cwrs gradd ar rywbeth nad yw eisoes yn elfen benodol o'r maes llafur a datblygu sgiliau astudio annibynnol a sgiliau ymchwil yn ystod eu semester dramor. Trwy'r cwrs hwn bydd myfyrwyr yn gwella eu sgiliau astudio a'u technegau ysgrifennu academaidd. Bwriad y modiwl hwn yw darparu sail ar gyfer y math o ysgrifennu sy'n ofynnol ar lefel ôl-raddedig.
  • LXG-3113: German Dissertation (JH Eng) (10) (Semester 1 + 2) or
    LCG-3113: German Dissertation (JH Welsh) (10) (Semester 1 + 2)
  • LXE-3210: Press Dossier (10) (10) (Semester 1)
    This module provides students with the opportunity to examine a topical issue relevant to one or more countries/regions in which the target language is spoken. The chosen issue will be examined through the prism of the press and media, in order to develop an understanding not only of the specific issue in question, but also of the media landscape of the relevant society. The resulting dossier will comprise the analysis of contrasting media and press types in their coverage of the chosen topic, as well as an assessment of their importance in influencing public opinion. The dossier will be written in the target language, and should contain an appendix of materials which have been examined. Busà, M. Grazia, Introducing the Language of the News: a Student's Guide (London: Routledge, 2014) Stevenson, Nick, Understanding Media Cultures: Social Theory and Mass Communication (London; Thousand Oaks: Sage, 1995) Harrison, Martin, TV news, Whose Bias? : a Casebook Analysis of Strikes, Television and Media Studies (Hermitage, Berks.: Policy Journals, 1985) Stocchetti Matteo and Karin Kukkonen, Critical Media Analysis: an Introduction for Media Professionals (Frankfurt am Main ; New York: Peter Lang, 2011) Van Dijk, Teun A., Discourse and Communication: New Approaches to the Analysis of Mass Media Discourse and Communication (Berlin; New York: W. de Gruyter, 1985) Websites: This section of SMLC website lists some of the major newspaper, TV and radio sites in German, French, Spanish and Italian media: http://www.bangor.ac.uk/ml/uglinks.php
    or
    LCE-3210: Astudio'r Cyfryngau (S1) (10) (Semester 1)
    Mae'r modiwl hwn yn rhoi cyfle i fyfyrwyr astudio pwnc cyfoes sy'n berthnasol i un neu fwy o wledydd/rhanbarthau lle y siaredir yr iaith darged. Gwyntyllir y pwnc a ddewisir drwy brism y wasg a'r cyfryngau, er mwyn magu dealltwriaeth o'r pwnc penodol ond hefyd o'r cyhoeddiadau a chyfryngau sydd ar gael yn y gymdeithas dan sylw. Bydd yr adroddiad terfynol yn cynnwys dadansoddiad o sut y mae mathau cyferbyniol o gyhoeddiadau a chyfryngau yn ymdrin â'r pwnc, yn ogystal ag asesiad o'u pwysigrwydd wrth ddylanwadu ar farn y cyhoedd. Ysgrifennir yr adroddiad yn yr iaith darged, ac atodir y deunyddiau a drafodir wrtho. Busà, M. Grazia, Introducing the Language of the News: a Student's Guide (London: Routledge, 2014) Stevenson, Nick, Understanding Media Cultures: Social Theory and Mass Communication (London; Thousand Oaks: Sage, 1995) Harrison, Martin, TV news, Whose Bias? : a Casebook Analysis of Strikes, Television and Media Studies (Hermitage, Berks.: Policy Journals, 1985) Stocchetti Matteo and Karin Kukkonen, Critical Media Analysis: an Introduction for Media Professionals (Frankfurt am Main ; New York: Peter Lang, 2011) Van Dijk, Teun A., Discourse and Communication: New Approaches to the Analysis of Mass Media Discourse and Communication (Berlin; New York: W. de Gruyter, 1985) Websites: This section of SMLC website lists some of the major newspaper, TV and radio sites in German, French, Spanish and Italian media: http://www.bangor.ac.uk/ml/uglinks.php
  • Joint Hons. Students may only take ONE LXE module