Module WXM-2201:
Schenkerian Techniques

Module Facts

Run by School of Music and Media

10 Credits or 5 ECTS Credits

Semester 2

Organiser: Mr Stephen Rees

Overall aims and purpose

This module will seek to help the student to:

  1. Gain understanding of the analytical theory and practice of Heinrich Schenker, with particular focus on his conceptual premises, analytical techniques and methods of presentation;

  2. Study specimen analyses of music from the period c.1700 to c.1900;

  3. Apply Schenkerian analytical techniques to selected pieces from the same period;

  4. Develop an awareness of structural processes in music, especially with regard to voice-leading;

  5. Evaluate the viability of applying Schenker’s method to repertory outside of his own area of study.

Course content

This module introduces the analytical theory and practice of Heinrich Schenker (1868–1935), with particular focus on his conceptual premises, analytical techniques and methods of presentation; specimen analyses of music from the period c.1700 to c.1900 will be considered in detail. Schenker’s techniques and methods will be applied to the analysis of other works from the same period. Additionally, the applicability of this methodology to music to ‘non-Schenkerian repertoires’ will be evaluated.

Assessment Criteria

threshold

Work that demonstrates a limited understanding of the analytical theory and practice of Heinrich Schenker and limited skills in the application of the methodology. Some evidence of understanding of structural processes in music and a limited ability to think critically, analytically and logically.

good

Work that demonstrates a good understanding of the analytical theory and practice of Heinrich Schenker and good skills in the application of the methodology. Evidence of a good understanding of structural processes in music and a good ability to think critically, analytically and logically.

excellent

Work that demonstrates an excellent understanding of the analytical theory and practice of Heinrich Schenker and robust skills in the application of the methodology. Evidence of excellent understanding of structural processes in music and an excellent ability to think critically, analytically and logically.

Learning outcomes

  1. acquired an understanding of the analytical theory and practice of Heinrich Schenker

  2. developed skills in their application of Schenker's Theories and Schenkerian methodology;

  3. acquired greater understanding of structural processes in music;

  4. developed their powers of critical, analytical and logical thought.

Assessment Methods

Type Name Description Weight
COURSEWORK Analysis Coursework 1

Analysis of a short instrumental piece.

20
COURSEWORK Analysis Coursework 2

Analysis of a song.

30
COURSEWORK Final Assignment in Analysis

Analysis of a more extended piece of music, together with prose commentary of 800–1000 words.

50

Teaching and Learning Strategy

Hours
Seminar

Normally one seminar of 50 minutes per week for 11 weeks.

11
Private study 78
Lecture

Normally one lecture of 50 minutes per week for 11 weeks.

11

Transferable skills

  • Literacy - Proficiency in reading and writing through a variety of media
  • Self-Management - Able to work unsupervised in an efficient, punctual and structured manner. To examine the outcomes of tasks and events, and judge levels of quality and importance
  • Exploring - Able to investigate, research and consider alternatives
  • Information retrieval - Able to access different and multiple sources of information
  • Inter-personal - Able to question, actively listen, examine given answers and interact sensitevely with others
  • Critical analysis & Problem Solving - Able to deconstruct and analyse problems or complex situations. To find solutions to problems through analyses and exploration of all possibilities using appropriate methods, rescources and creativity.
  • Argument - Able to put forward, debate and justify an opinion or a course of action, with an individual or in a wider group setting
  • Self-awareness & Reflectivity - Having an awareness of your own strengths, weaknesses, aims and objectives. Able to regularly review, evaluate and reflect upon the performance of yourself and others

Subject specific skills

  • Musicianship skills – recognition, classification, contextualisation, reconstruction, exploration
  • Intellectual skills specific to Music – contextual knowledge, cultural awareness, critical understanding, repertoire knowledge, curiosity, analytical demonstration
  • Intellectual skills shared with other disciplines – research and exploration, reasoning and logic, understanding, critical judgement, assimilation and application
  • Skills of communication and interaction – oral and written communication, public presentation, team-working and collaboration, awareness of professional protocols, sensitivity, ICT skills, etc.
  • Skills of personal management – self-motivation, self-critical awareness, independence, entrepreneurship and employment skills, time management and reliability, organisation, etc.
  • Enhanced powers of imagination and creativity (4.17)

Resources

Resource implications for students

Set text: purchase of following volume is a requirement. Tom Pankhurst, *SchenkerGUIDE: A Brief Handbook and Website for Schenkerian Analysis* (Abingdon and New York: Routledge, 2008). ISBN: 9780415973984

Reading list

SET TEXT: REQUIRED PURCHASE

Pankhurst, Tom, SchenkerGUIDE (New York, 2008). Available as an e-book via Bangor Library catalogue [note accompanying website at http://www.schenkerguide.com/]


Bent, Ian D. & Anthony Pople, ‘Analysis, §II, 4: 1910-45’, Stanley Sadie (ed.), The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians (London, 2001), 548–53 [Oxford Music Online]

Cadwallader, Allen & David Gagné, Analysis of Tonal Music: A Schenkerian Approach (Oxford, 1998). MT6.C12 A53 1998

Cook, Nicholas, ‘Schenkerian Analysis’, A Guide to Music Analysis (London, 1987), pp.27-66. MT6.C775G8

Forte, Allen & Steven E. Gilbert, Introduction to Schenkerian Analysis (New York, 1982) MT6.F642I6

Jonas, Oswald, ‘Introduction’ to The Theory of Heinrich Schenker: The Nature of the Musical Work of Art, translated and edited by John Rothgeb (New York, c.1982) MT6.J76W43

Salzer, Felix, Structural Hearing: Tonal Coherence in Music, 2 volumes (New York, 1952) MT40.S24

Schenker, Heinrich, Fünf Urlinie-Tafeln (= Five Graphic Music Analyses) (New York, 1969) MT140.S29

Schenker, Heinrich, Der freie Satz (= Free Composition) vols. 1 and 2, trans./ed. Ernst Oster (New York, c. 1979) MT40.S29213

Yeston, Maury (ed.), Readings in Schenker analysis and other approaches (New Haven, 1977) ML432.S33 R4

Pre- and Co-requisite Modules

Courses including this module

Optional in courses: