Module WXM-2207:
Harmony & Counterpoint Year 2

Module Facts

Run by School of Music and Media

20 Credits or 10 ECTS Credits

Semester 1 & 2

Organiser: Dr John Cunningham

Overall aims and purpose

To secure all the learning outcomes. This module seeks to build on the skills developed in WXM 1004/1008. It covers a range of music from renaissance to early 19th-century

Course content

This module builds on and develops the basic analytical and (pastiche) compositional skills acquired in WXM/WXC 1004/1008. It will explore in detail a variety of vocal and instrumental music, and compositional practices and techniques from the late sixteenth to the early nineteenth centuries; students will be introduced to a range of music from analytical and compositional perspectives. The module will focus on particular genres (such as piano sonata, string quartet) and forms (such as sonata- form exposition, rondo). It will also introduce students to advanced chromaticism and modulation in a range of contexts; these aspects will also be discussed in relation to historical development.

Assessment Criteria

threshold

work which demonstrates a limited knowledge and technical command of the subject, with a restricted ability at musical thought, little evidence of a musical approach, but nevertheless expressed in an understandable way.

good

Work which shows a competent grasp of the subject, both intellectually and technically, with good conceptual thought, evidence of musical and intellectual acumen, expressed clearly in either music notation or, when required, in prose.

excellent

Work which demonstrates a thorough grasp of the subject, both musically and intellectually, with evidence of further study and deeper conceptual thought, some originality of musical approach, expressed in a convincing and notionally flawless manner.

Learning outcomes

  1. gained a detailed understanding of a range of compositional practices, musical styles, forms and genres from the late Renaissance to late Classical periods;

  2. become acquainted with specific musical compositions of the periods in question;

  3. honed skills in score reading and aural perception;

  4. developed strong understanding of advanced harmony and counterpoint (in theory and practice).

  5. developed skills in pastiche composition;

  6. developed skills in analysis

Assessment Methods

Type Name Description Weight
COURSEWORK coursework1

Assessment details: Each week you will be given unassessed coursework to be completed for the seminars, which serves to build up the skills required in the assessed components. The assessed components all involve two elements, jointly or severally: (1) analysis of the repertoire using the formal analytical approaches taught in the module, and (2) analysis in practice – i.e. demonstrating an ability to write in a pastiche style based on the analytical methods taught. We will develop techniques of reduction and expansion taught in year 1. You will not be graded on your compositional creativity but on your ability to show your understanding of the analytical principles through practice. Prose descriptions are often required to supplement your score analysis; in such instances, no word limit is set: they are intended to be used in conjunction with your score analysis and should discuss elements of the work that are not easily accessible from the score analysis, such as unusual formal procedures or deviations from normative examples discussed. The repertoire chosen for the assignments is subject to variation based on course content.

Coursework 1: this typically comprises two elements: (1) analysis of imitative entries; (2) analysis in practice: writing imitative entries.

10
COURSEWORK coursework2

Each week you will be given unassessed coursework to be completed for the seminars, which serves to build up the skills required in the assessed components. The assessed components all involve two elements, jointly or severally: (1) analysis of the repertoire using the formal analytical approaches taught in the module, and (2) analysis in practice – i.e. demonstrating an ability to write in a pastiche style based on the analytical methods taught. We will develop techniques of reduction and expansion taught in year 1. You will not be graded on your compositional creativity but on your ability to show your understanding of the analytical principles through practice. Prose descriptions are often required to supplement your score analysis; in such instances, no word limit is set: they are intended to be used in conjunction with your score analysis and should discuss elements of the work that are not easily accessible from the score analysis, such as unusual formal procedures or deviations from normative examples discussed. The repertoire chosen for the assignments is subject to variation based on course content.

Coursework 2: this typically comprises two elements: (1) analysis of an extract in imitative counterpoint; (2) analysis in practice: completion an excerpt in imitative counterpoint.

10
COURSEWORK coursework3

Each week you will be given unassessed coursework to be completed for the seminars, which serves to build up the skills required in the assessed components. The assessed components all involve two elements, jointly or severally: (1) analysis of the repertoire using the formal analytical approaches taught in the module, and (2) analysis in practice – i.e. demonstrating an ability to write in a pastiche style based on the analytical methods taught. We will develop techniques of reduction and expansion taught in year 1. You will not be graded on your compositional creativity but on your ability to show your understanding of the analytical principles through practice. Prose descriptions are often required to supplement your score analysis; in such instances, no word limit is set: they are intended to be used in conjunction with your score analysis and should discuss elements of the work that are not easily accessible from the score analysis, such as unusual formal procedures or deviations from normative examples discussed. The repertoire chosen for the assignments is subject to variation based on course content.

Coursework 3: this typically comprises two elements: (1) analysis of a two-part Bach invention; (2) exercises in invertible counterpoint.

10
COURSEWORK coursework4

Each week you will be given unassessed coursework to be completed for the seminars, which serves to build up the skills required in the assessed components. The assessed components all involve two elements, jointly or severally: (1) analysis of the repertoire using the formal analytical approaches taught in the module, and (2) analysis in practice – i.e. demonstrating an ability to write in a pastiche style based on the analytical methods taught. We will develop techniques of reduction and expansion taught in year 1. You will not be graded on your compositional creativity but on your ability to show your understanding of the analytical principles through practice. Prose descriptions are often required to supplement your score analysis; in such instances, no word limit is set: they are intended to be used in conjunction with your score analysis and should discuss elements of the work that are not easily accessible from the score analysis, such as unusual formal procedures or deviations from normative examples discussed. The repertoire chosen for the assignments is subject to variation based on course content.

Coursework 4: this typically comprises two elements: (1) an analysis of a piece from the classical repertoire, with slurs and figured roman numerals and a short prose description; (2) analysis in practice: exercises in chordal reduction and harmonic identification.

10
COURSEWORK coursework5

Each week you will be given unassessed coursework to be completed for the seminars, which serves to build up the skills required in the assessed components. The assessed components all involve two elements, jointly or severally: (1) analysis of the repertoire using the formal analytical approaches taught in the module, and (2) analysis in practice – i.e. demonstrating an ability to write in a pastiche style based on the analytical methods taught. We will develop techniques of reduction and expansion taught in year 1. You will not be graded on your compositional creativity but on your ability to show your understanding of the analytical principles through practice. Prose descriptions are often required to supplement your score analysis; in such instances, no word limit is set: they are intended to be used in conjunction with your score analysis and should discuss elements of the work that are not easily accessible from the score analysis, such as unusual formal procedures or deviations from normative examples discussed. The repertoire chosen for the assignments is subject to variation based on course content.

Coursework 5: this typically comprises two elements: (1) an analysis of a piece from the classical repertoire, with slurs and figured roman numerals and a short prose description; (2) analysis in practice: completing a rounded binary form from a conventional theme type.

10
COURSEWORK coursework6

Each week you will be given unassessed coursework to be completed for the seminars, which serves to build up the skills required in the assessed components. The assessed components all involve two elements, jointly or severally: (1) analysis of the repertoire using the formal analytical approaches taught in the module, and (2) analysis in practice – i.e. demonstrating an ability to write in a pastiche style based on the analytical methods taught. We will develop techniques of reduction and expansion taught in year 1. You will not be graded on your compositional creativity but on your ability to show your understanding of the analytical principles through practice. Prose descriptions are often required to supplement your score analysis; in such instances, no word limit is set: they are intended to be used in conjunction with your score analysis and should discuss elements of the work that are not easily accessible from the score analysis, such as unusual formal procedures or deviations from normative examples discussed. The repertoire chosen for the assignments is subject to variation based on course content.

Coursework 6: this typically comprises one element: (1) analysis in practice: developing a two-bar basic idea into a complete binary form, using techniques of expansion from chordal reductions. A prose description is required.

10
COURSEWORK assignment1

Each week you will be given unassessed coursework to be completed for the seminars, which serves to build up the skills required in the assessed components. The assessed components all involve two elements, jointly or severally: (1) analysis of the repertoire using the formal analytical approaches taught in the module, and (2) analysis in practice – i.e. demonstrating an ability to write in a pastiche style based on the analytical methods taught. We will develop techniques of reduction and expansion taught in year 1. You will not be graded on your compositional creativity but on your ability to show your understanding of the analytical principles through practice. Prose descriptions are often required to supplement your score analysis; in such instances, no word limit is set: they are intended to be used in conjunction with your score analysis and should discuss elements of the work that are not easily accessible from the score analysis, such as unusual formal procedures or deviations from normative examples discussed. The repertoire chosen for the assignments is subject to variation based on course content.

Main assignment 1: this typically comprises two elements: (1) analysis of a reportorial extract; (2) analysis in practice: developing a two-bar basic idea into a conventional theme type.

20
COURSEWORK assignment2

Each week you will be given unassessed coursework to be completed for the seminars, which serves to build up the skills required in the assessed components. The assessed components all involve two elements, jointly or severally: (1) analysis of the repertoire using the formal analytical approaches taught in the module, and (2) analysis in practice – i.e. demonstrating an ability to write in a pastiche style based on the analytical methods taught. We will develop techniques of reduction and expansion taught in year 1. You will not be graded on your compositional creativity but on your ability to show your understanding of the analytical principles through practice. Prose descriptions are often required to supplement your score analysis; in such instances, no word limit is set: they are intended to be used in conjunction with your score analysis and should discuss elements of the work that are not easily accessible from the score analysis, such as unusual formal procedures or deviations from normative examples discussed. The repertoire chosen for the assignments is subject to variation based on course content.

Main assignment 2: this typically comprises two elements: (1) an analysis of a piece from the classical repertoire, with slurs and figured roman numerals and a short prose description; (2) analysis in practice: writing a transition to complete a main theme and a subordinate theme of a sonata-form exposition.

20

Teaching and Learning Strategy

Hours
Lecture

One lecture of 50 minutes per week for 22 weeks.

22
Private study

Including preparation for lectures and seminars; and completing un-assessed coursework. Students are welcome to have individual tutorials about any aspect of this module and the assignments.

156
Seminar

One Seminar of 50 minutes per week for 22 weeks

22

Transferable skills

  • Literacy - Proficiency in reading and writing through a variety of media
  • Numeracy - Proficiency in using numbers at appropriate levels of accuracy
  • Self-Management - Able to work unsupervised in an efficient, punctual and structured manner. To examine the outcomes of tasks and events, and judge levels of quality and importance
  • Exploring - Able to investigate, research and consider alternatives
  • Inter-personal - Able to question, actively listen, examine given answers and interact sensitevely with others
  • Critical analysis & Problem Solving - Able to deconstruct and analyse problems or complex situations. To find solutions to problems through analyses and exploration of all possibilities using appropriate methods, rescources and creativity.
  • Teamwork - Able to constructively cooperate with others on a common task, and/or be part of a day-to-day working team
  • Argument - Able to put forward, debate and justify an opinion or a course of action, with an individual or in a wider group setting
  • Self-awareness & Reflectivity - Having an awareness of your own strengths, weaknesses, aims and objectives. Able to regularly review, evaluate and reflect upon the performance of yourself and others

Subject specific skills

  • Musicianship skills – recognition, classification, contextualisation, reconstruction, exploration
  • Intellectual skills specific to Music – contextual knowledge, cultural awareness, critical understanding, repertoire knowledge, curiosity, analytical demonstration
  • Intellectual skills shared with other disciplines – research and exploration, reasoning and logic, understanding, critical judgement, assimilation and application
  • Skills of communication and interaction – oral and written communication, public presentation, team-working and collaboration, awareness of professional protocols, sensitivity, ICT skills, etc.
  • Skills of personal management – self-motivation, self-critical awareness, independence, entrepreneurship and employment skills, time management and reliability, organisation, etc.

Resources

Resource implications for students

None. Detailed course notes are made available on Blackboard each week to supplement the lectures. If required most materials are available in Welsh.

Talis Reading list

http://readinglists.bangor.ac.uk/modules/wxm-2207.html

Reading list

Talis

Pre- and Co-requisite Modules

Courses including this module

Optional in courses: