Modules for course M1V5 | LLB/LPR
LLB Law with Philosophy and Religion

This is a provisional list of modules to be offered on this course in the 2019–20 academic year.

The list may not be complete, and the final course content may be different.

You can also view the modules offered in the years: 2017–18; 2018–19.

Find out more about studying and applying for this degree.

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Year 1 Modules

Compulsory Modules

Semester 1

  • SXL-1110: Public Law (20)
    The module comprises two distinct areas of law: constitutional law and administrative law. In addition, it provides students with an introduction to human rights law and the key provisions of the Human Rights Act 1998. Lectures on constitutional law include the sources of constitutional law, constitutional doctrines, the institutions of the Constitution and the influence of human rights law and EU Law on the Constitution. The section of the course devoted to administrative law provides an introduction to this area of law and focuses on the role of the judiciary and the workings of judicial review.
  • SXL-1112: Contract Law (20)
    The module will provide the student with the foundations governing the formation and enforceability of contracts (promise, acceptance and agreement), areas of capacity, intention, legality and certainty of terms. The module includes the remedies available to the parties to a contract and the doctrine of privity of contract. The module will also cover an outline of the law of restitution.
  • SXL-1113: Legal System England & Wales (20)
    The module introduces the student to the English Legal System, providing a framework to study what is Law, how the system operates and the system in a social context. The module examines the court structure, both civil and criminal, the judiciary, lawyers and the role and significance of lay participation in the system (magistrates, juries and tribunal members) and the development of Human Rights Law. Where relevant, comparisons will be drawn to the Welsh body of law that is emerging from the devolved administration. Students will be encouraged to develop a critical analysis of the system as it moves into the 21st century, in comparison with other countries and with attention to its history.
  • SXL-1115: Legal Skills (20)
    The module introduces the student to practical legal study skills such as: effective note-taking, legal essay writing, legal problem solving, presenting an argument, mooting, team working, effective time management, revision techniques etc. Students will be guided in effective application of these skills to researching the law (using the law library, on-line sources, finding legislation, finding cases etc.), reading the law (reading legislation, reading law reports, reading academic legal literature etc.), constructing oral argument and defending legal argument, and analysing and evaluating the law.

Semester 2

  • SXL-1110: Public Law
    The module comprises two distinct areas of law: constitutional law and administrative law. In addition, it provides students with an introduction to human rights law and the key provisions of the Human Rights Act 1998. Lectures on constitutional law include the sources of constitutional law, constitutional doctrines, the institutions of the Constitution and the influence of human rights law and EU Law on the Constitution. The section of the course devoted to administrative law provides an introduction to this area of law and focuses on the role of the judiciary and the workings of judicial review.
  • SXL-1112: Contract Law
    The module will provide the student with the foundations governing the formation and enforceability of contracts (promise, acceptance and agreement), areas of capacity, intention, legality and certainty of terms. The module includes the remedies available to the parties to a contract and the doctrine of privity of contract. The module will also cover an outline of the law of restitution.
  • SXL-1113: Legal System England & Wales
    The module introduces the student to the English Legal System, providing a framework to study what is Law, how the system operates and the system in a social context. The module examines the court structure, both civil and criminal, the judiciary, lawyers and the role and significance of lay participation in the system (magistrates, juries and tribunal members) and the development of Human Rights Law. Where relevant, comparisons will be drawn to the Welsh body of law that is emerging from the devolved administration. Students will be encouraged to develop a critical analysis of the system as it moves into the 21st century, in comparison with other countries and with attention to its history.
  • SXL-1115: Legal Skills
    The module introduces the student to practical legal study skills such as: effective note-taking, legal essay writing, legal problem solving, presenting an argument, mooting, team working, effective time management, revision techniques etc. Students will be guided in effective application of these skills to researching the law (using the law library, on-line sources, finding legislation, finding cases etc.), reading the law (reading legislation, reading law reports, reading academic legal literature etc.), constructing oral argument and defending legal argument, and analysing and evaluating the law.

Optional Modules

40 credits from:

  • HPS-1007: Islam:Hist, Soc and Beliefs (20) (Semester 1)
  • VPR-1105: Ethics: Religious Perspectives (20) (Semester 2)
    The module will begin with a discussion of the origin of ethics and will examine some of the relevant survivng materials relevant to the subject from the great civilizations of Mesopotamia and Egypt (including the stories about heroes who exemplified the kind of virtues most admired, and the legal codes which defined acceptable and unacceptable conduct). The module will then examine the ethical values of the Jewish religion, as reflected in the Old Testament, and the ethical values of the Christian tradition as reflected in the New Testament. This will be followed by an overview of ethical concerns in the Buddhist tradition. The module will conclude with an examination of the ‘divine command’ theory of ethics and will consider to what extent the moral good should be identified with God’s will or God’s command.
    or
    VPC-1105: Moeseg: Agweddau Crefyddol (20) (Semester 2)
    Bydd y modiwl yn dechrau gyda thrafodaeth ar darddiad moeseg a bydd yn edrych ar beth o'r deunyddiau perthnasol i'r pwnc sydd wedi goroesi o ddiwylliannau mawr Mesopotamia a'r Aifft (yn cynnwys storïau am arwyr a ymgorfforai'r rhinweddau a edmygid fwyaf, a'r codau cyfreithiol a ddiffiniai ymddygiad derbyniol ac annerbyniol). Bydd y modiwl wedyn yn archwilio gwerthoedd moesegol y grefydd Iddewig, fel yr adlewyrchir hwynt yn yr Hen Destament, a gwerthoedd moesegol y traddodiad Cristnogol, fel yr adlewyrchir hwynt yn y Testament Newydd. Yn dilyn hynny ceir golwg gyffredinol ar faterion moesegol sy'n gysylltiedig â'r traddodiad Bwdistaidd. Daw'r modiwl i'w derfyn drwy edrych ar ddamcaniaeth foesegol 'gorchymyn dwyfol', a bydd yn ystyried i ba raddau y dylid uniaethu daioni moesol ag ewyllys Duw neu orchymyn Duw.
  • VPR-1106: Intro: Judaism & Christianity (20) (Semester 1)
    The module outlines of some of the basic tenets of the Jewish faith as reflected in the Old Testament and the Christian faith as reflected in the New Testament. Among issues considered will be the contribution to the Jewish faith by the rabbis and the controversies faced by Judaism over the centuries, culminating in a discussion of issues relating to the holocaust. Among Jewish philosophers discussed will be Maimonides and Martin Buber. The modules will then turn to the Christian faith and will examine some of the theological issues arising from the New Testament, with a particular focus on Paul’s theology and the Early Church Fathers, such as Origen and Eusebius. There will also be a discussion of a representative sample of major Christian thinkers over the centuries.
  • VPR-1110: Themes - Eastern Religion/Phil (20) (Semester 2)
    This module offers an introduction to the philosophical and religious development of key eastern religious traditions - Hinduism, Islam, Sikhism, Buddhism, Confucianism and Shinto – and provides a detailed overview of their origins, histories, doctrines and scriptures. In order to explore a wide spectrum of religious and philosophical beliefs, the following will be considered teaching priorities: (1) Survey of the beliefs and practices of six Eastern religions and philosophies; (2) understand the multifaceted religious heritage of the six Eastern religions – from the pre-modern era to contemporary religious practice; (3) Examination of the mutual influences and intersections of the Eastern religions and philosophies and how they interact with other elements of Eastern culture and society; (4) Deconstruct the East and West meeting points, focusing on the spread and influence of Eastern religion and philosophy in the West.
  • VPR-1300: Intro to Philosophy of Religio (20) (Semester 1)
    The module begins by clarifying the state of the analytic philosophy of religion at the turn of the 20th century, reflecting upon its inheritance of 19th century ‘modernity’. This is contrasted with some concurrent developments in the continental tradition (German Romanticism, Dostoevsky, Nietzsche). This is the context from which, and into which, Wittgenstein speaks. We will cover the early, middle, and late eras of Wittgenstein’s thought, and show the revolutionary impact that his thought had for the philosophy of religion. We track the various directions in which Wittgenstein’s influence was felt; for example, in A. J. Ayer’s verificationism, or those overtly ‘Wittgensteinian’ philosophers of religion such as D. Z. Phillips. The ‘meta-philosophy of religion’ is introduced throughout, as we tackle the question of how best to philosophise about religion.
  • VPR-1301: Introduction to Logic (20) (Semester 2)
  • VPC-1303: Cyflwyniad i Gristnogaeth (20) (Semester 1)

Year 2 Modules

Compulsory Modules

Semester 1

  • SXL-2110: European Union Law (20)
    The module will provide the student with a comprehensive overview of the political institutions and processes of the European Union and will include the European Court of Justice and its jurisdiction; the sources and general principles of the Law of the European Union; the relationship between the Law of the European Union and National Law. There will also be an introduction to the main area of substantive law of the European Union.
  • SXL-2112: Tort (20)
    The module will allow the student to study the modern English law of torts, in particular the law relating to: negligence, nuisance, liability for psychiatric injury, occupiers liability, product liability, trespass to the person, defamation and other major torts to allow the students to apply the general principles and defences.
  • SXL-2113: Criminal Law (20)
    The module will allow the student to study the modern English criminal law, in particular the law relating to: Introduction; Actus Reus; Mens Rea; Negligence and Strict Liability; General Defences; Parties to Crime; Inchoate Offences; Homicide; Non-fatal Offences against the Person; Offences under the Theft Acts 1968 and 1978: Theft and Related Offences; Offences involving Deception; Further Offences under the Theft Act; Criminal Damage; Sexual Offences.
  • SXL-2211: Equity and Trusts (20)
    The module will allow the student to study the relationship between Equity and Common Law and cover areas of trusts as used for family or commercial or for public charitable purposes. A study will be made of express, resulting and constructive trusts of property, trustees powers and obligations and the nature and scope of fiduciary obligations. The student will be able to identify the nature and scope of equitable rights and equitable remedies including tracing, freezing injunctions, search orders, specific performance, imposition of personal liability to account as constructive trustee, estoppel entitlements to property or compensation and the developing principle of unconscionability.

Semester 2

  • SXL-2112: Tort
    The module will allow the student to study the modern English law of torts, in particular the law relating to: negligence, nuisance, liability for psychiatric injury, occupiers liability, product liability, trespass to the person, defamation and other major torts to allow the students to apply the general principles and defences.
  • SXL-2113: Criminal Law
    The module will allow the student to study the modern English criminal law, in particular the law relating to: Introduction; Actus Reus; Mens Rea; Negligence and Strict Liability; General Defences; Parties to Crime; Inchoate Offences; Homicide; Non-fatal Offences against the Person; Offences under the Theft Acts 1968 and 1978: Theft and Related Offences; Offences involving Deception; Further Offences under the Theft Act; Criminal Damage; Sexual Offences.
  • SXL-2211: Equity and Trusts
    The module will allow the student to study the relationship between Equity and Common Law and cover areas of trusts as used for family or commercial or for public charitable purposes. A study will be made of express, resulting and constructive trusts of property, trustees powers and obligations and the nature and scope of fiduciary obligations. The student will be able to identify the nature and scope of equitable rights and equitable remedies including tracing, freezing injunctions, search orders, specific performance, imposition of personal liability to account as constructive trustee, estoppel entitlements to property or compensation and the developing principle of unconscionability.

Optional Modules

40 credits from:

  • HPS-2008: Sociology of Religion (20) (Semester 2)
  • VPR-2202: Applied Ethics (20) (Semester 1)
    The module will begin with a brief outline of the various ethical challenges which face contemporary society. It will then consider the following issues: (a) world poverty (is it the responsibility of individuals or governments or both to alleviate world poverty?); (b) the arguments justifying an environmental ethic; ethical considerations to be considered in the case of voluntary and non-voluntary euthanasia; the issue of abortion and the notion of reverence for human life; war and peace (the just war theory; ethics and nuclear weapons etc).
  • VPC-2205: Byd Naturiol yng Nghref. y Gor (20) (Semester 2)
    Yn 1967 cyhoeddodd Lynn White erthygl ddylanwadol yn cyhuddo Cristnogaeth o fod yn gyfrifol i raddau helaeth am y problemau amgylcheddol a oedd yn dechrau cael sylw yn y Gorllewin. Bydd y modiwl yn ystyried ymatebion Cristnogaeth i'r awgrym hwn a bydd yn archwilio ei pherthynas hanesyddol â'r byd naturiol. Rhoddir sylw hefyd i amrywiaeth o gysylltiadau eraill rhwng crefydd ac amgylcheddaeth yn y byd Gorllewinol, yn cynnwys y rhai sy'n gysylltiedig â damcaniaeth Gaia, James Lovelock. Ystyrir meysydd penodol sy'n destun pryder amgylcheddol, megis newid hinsawdd a thechnoleg niwclear o ran eu perthynas â thrafodaeth grefyddol a rhoddir sylw i'r rhyngweithio cymhleth rhwng gwleidyddiaeth, amgylcheddaeth a chrefydd yn y maes trafod hwn.
  • VPR-2219: Comp. Philosophy: East/West (20) (Semester 2)
    This module seeks to explore two distinct philosophical traditions: Eastern and Western. Framing the module in a comparative way enables students to identify key relationships and differences that relate to major philosophical themes. In particular, the module begins by defining the comparative philosophical approach, which will be used throughout the course as the means to study the East and the West. The vast majority of the module will be dedicated to examining different metaphysical and ethical concerns. The module will explore several key thematic notions: (1) Reason and Faith (ignorance, knowledge, causation, scepticism, revelation and divinity); (2) Reality (origins, existence, monism, dualism, pluralism and naturalism); (3) Virtue (tradition, divinity, rites, human nature and altruism); (4) Mind (enlightenment, emptiness, transcendence, introspection and immanence).
  • VPR-2300: Ancient Philosophy (20) (Semester 1)
    This module provides a broad overview of, and introduction to, ancient philosophy in the Western tradition. It will cover, mainly in chronological order, the entirety of the ‘ancient’ philosophical era, beginning with the pre-Socratics, moving through Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle, and onwards to Stoicism, some key Roman philosophers, and Neo-Platonism. Emphasis will be put on the connections between ancient philosophy and later philosophical or religious developments, and on the influence that ancient philosophy has had on human thought generally. Historical narrative detail will be included where relevant (e.g., Socrates’ death, the Peloponnesian War, Aristotle and Alexander the Great, etc.) to provide context. Significant emphasis will be placed on the continued relevance that ancient philosophical schools can have for our modern lives, enabling us to overcome adversity and ‘live well’.
  • VPR-2301: 20th Century Phil of Religion (20) (Semester 2)
    The module begins by clarifying the state of the analytic philosophy of religion at the turn of the 20th century, reflecting upon its inheritance of 19th century ‘modernity’. This is contrasted with some concurrent developments in the continental tradition (German Romanticism, Dostoevsky, Nietzsche). This is the context from which, and into which, Wittgenstein speaks. We will cover the early, middle, and late eras of Wittgenstein’s thought, and show the revolutionary impact that his thought had for the philosophy of religion. We track the various directions in which Wittgenstein’s influence was felt; for example, in A. J. Ayer’s verificationism, or those overtly ‘Wittgensteinian’ philosophers of religion such as D. Z. Phillips. The ‘meta-philosophy of religion’ is introduced throughout, as we tackle the question of how best to philosophise about religion.
  • VPR-2302: Faith and Reason (20) (Semester 2)
    The module is composed of two parts, each looking at the interaction of ‘faith’ and ‘reason’. In the first part, I construct a narrative regarding the origins of our modern conception of ‘reason’, contrasting this with our conception of what it is to have ‘faith’. This narrative begins with Francis Bacon and (which is the more usual philosophical starting point) Descartes. I develop this through certain key thinkers of the modern period (Spinoza, Locke, Hume), concluding with the 19th century’s conception of ‘natural theology’. I press the case that a certain conception of ‘reason’ squeezed ‘faith’ out of the picture (along with a great deal of other meaningful dimensions of human life), prompting us to ask whether we must hold to the traditional conception of ‘reason’ at any cost. The second part of the module looks at contemporary examples of the interaction of ‘reason’ and ‘faith’, in the form of the interaction of science and religion. We consider examples of science being used to support religion (‘Intelligent Design’, the ‘Fine Tuning’ argument), and to debunk religion (evolution, the cognitive science of religion), and ask whether science and religion must necessarily be in conflict with each other. No prior philosophical or scientific knowledge is presumed. A brief introduction to quantum theory will be included.
  • VPR-2303: Immanuel Kant (20) (Semester 1)
    This module provides an introduction to the thought of Immanuel Kant. It covers his contributions to metaphysics and epistemology, by discussing his ‘transcendental idealism’. It covers Kant’s significant contributions to ethics, introducing the various formulations of his ‘categorical imperative’. It covers his contributions to the philosophy of religion, in particular his moral argument for belief in God. Throughout the module, I place Kant in the context of the history of philosophy, identifying those key aspects of philosophy to which Kant was responding (i.e., rationalism and empiricism), and those philosophers whose work was shaped by Kant’s legacy. Finally, we reflect on the place Kant’s thought holds in contemporary philosophy, particularly moral philosophy.
  • VPR-2305: Hinduism in the Modern World (20) (Semester 1)
  • VPC-2404: Iddewiaeth yn Byd Modern (20) (Semester 2)
  • VPC-2406: Crefydd yng Nghymru (20) (Semester 1)
  • VPC-2407: Yr Eglwys a'r Iddewon (20) (Semester 1)
  • VPR-2408: Religious Education (20) (Semester 2) or
    VPC-2408: Addysg Grefyddol (20) (Semester 2)

Year 3 Modules

Compulsory Modules

Semester 1

  • SXL-3111: Land Law (20)
    The module will allow the student to study English and Welsh land law, including the nature of land, the development of land law, the law relating to land registration and the distinction between registered and unregistered land, title to land, settlements of land, trusts of land and co-ownership, the law relating to freehold and leasehold estates in land, licences, easements and profits a prendre, freehold covenants, and the regulation of mortgages.
  • SXL-3121: Company Law (20)
    The module will allow the student to study the modern English company law and partnership law, in particular the law relating to the registered company, corporate personality, corporate governance, small business and groups of companies, investor protection and liquidation. The module will also adopt an international perspective in that students will be required to undertake some comparative research.

Semester 2

  • SXL-3111: Land Law
    The module will allow the student to study English and Welsh land law, including the nature of land, the development of land law, the law relating to land registration and the distinction between registered and unregistered land, title to land, settlements of land, trusts of land and co-ownership, the law relating to freehold and leasehold estates in land, licences, easements and profits a prendre, freehold covenants, and the regulation of mortgages.
  • SXL-3121: Company Law
    The module will allow the student to study the modern English company law and partnership law, in particular the law relating to the registered company, corporate personality, corporate governance, small business and groups of companies, investor protection and liquidation. The module will also adopt an international perspective in that students will be required to undertake some comparative research.

Optional Modules

40 credits from:

  • SXL-3026: Forensic Linguistics in Court (10) (Semester 1)
  • SXL-3110: Int. Law & Contemporary Issues (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    The aim of this module is to enhance students’ understanding about human rights in an international context. Students will begin with the building blocks, starting with some of the fundamental principles of Public International Law which are required learning for all students of International Human Rights Law. These will include the nature of international law and how it relates to domestic legal systems, international legal personality including Statehood and the human person in the international system, sources of international law including treaty law, and the law of responsibility. On grasping these core principles students will be well placed to move forward to more sophisticated examination of international human rights law. Students will examine the leading philosophical and political debates about the nature of the human person in the international system. They will assess the evolution and significance of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and the sea change that it inspired in regard to the rights of the human person internationally and domestically. Students will study mechanisms for the resolution of human rights disputes, such as the United Nations, international courts and tribunals and domestic bodies. This course will situate the study of the international law pertaining to human rights in the context of broader current affairs and will address leading recent cases and international legal and political controversies that impact upon the most basic fundamental rights of human beings.
  • SXL-3113: Dissertation (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    The module will provide students with the opportunity to develop their research skills; an opportunity to develop their skills of written presentation; and an opportunity to research a topic in more depth than is otherwise possible during their undergraduate studies.
  • SXL-3125: Evidence (20) (Semester 2)
    The module will allow the student to study the modern English and Welsh law of evidence, including the law relating to: the burden and standard of proof, hearsay, confessions and the right to silence, corroboration, competence and compellability, identification evidence, opinion evidence, evidence of character, and similar fact evidence.
  • SXL-3126: Family & Welfare Law (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    The module will allow the student to study modern English and Welsh family and welfare law, in particular the law relating to adult relationships and family property, the relationship between children and adults, the resolution of disputes concerning children, the protection of children and the law of adoption, legal responses to domestic violence, and the law relating to homelessness and the protection of elderly and vulnerable adults.
  • SXL-3127: Jurisprudence (20) (Semester 2)
    This course examines key issues in jurisprudence and legal philosophy such as legal positivism and natural law, the relationship of law and morals, theories of justice and rights and the nature of the good life. Students will critically examine selected legal philosophies with reference to key current concerns such as the relationship between different branches of the State, domestic and international political issues including terrorism and security, the right to privacy and the rule of law principle. Students will be expected to address these issues with respect to standard and more advanced jurisprudential theories and concepts and to develop a critical personal opinion based on assessment of the theories examined during this course.
  • SXL-3128: Employment Law (20) (Semester 1)
    The module provides a historical outline and an evaluation of the rules of the various institutions involved. The substantive content includes contract formation, equality rights, family friendly policies, employment protection, collective action, and comparative analysis.
  • SXL-3130: Media Law (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    The module will allow the student to study modern English & Welsh and some aspects of European Union media law in the context of the operation of the modern media, in particular the law relating to issues such as freedom of the press, defamation, contempt of court, protection of journalists’ sources, freedom of information and privacy. It will also examine the legal regulation of broadcasting in the UK and Europe, with particular attention to licensing, freedom of transmission and reception of programmes, broadcasting standards, the role of the Office of Communications (OFCOM) and European Union broadcasting policy and the impact of the EU Audio-Visual Media Services Directive.
  • SXL-3135: Legal Research Jurisprudence (20) (Semester 2)
    This course examines key issues in jurisprudence and legal philosophy such as legal positivism and natural law, the relationship of law and morals, theories of justice and rights and the nature of the good life. Students will critically examine selected legal philosophies with reference to key current concerns such as the relationship between different branches of the State, domestic and international political issues including terrorism and security, the right to privacy and the rule of law principle.
  • SXL-3136: Intellectual Property Law (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    The course will consist of a historical overview of the development of intellectual property law in the UK, at European Union level and internationally. It will examine the law of copyright in relation to literary, musical, dramatic and artistic works as well as in broadcasts, films and sound recordings. It will also examine performers’ rights in their performances. It will also examine the law of trade secrets, patent law, the registration and protection of designs and trade marks and the common law tort of passing-off. In each of the areas, the scope of protection will be examined, the rights conferred on the holders of the rights, dealings in the rights and remedies, both civil and criminal, against infringers of rights
  • SCL-3141: Y Gyfraith ar Waith (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
  • SXL-3142: International Law of the Sea (20) (Semester 2)
    The International Law of the Sea module will cover a myriad of emerging uses of the sea and the legal problems that these bring to the international forum. The module also touches on aspects of maritime law, international law, and environmental law. The module commences with a brief introduction, and the history and development of the law of the sea before moving on to focus on the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea 1982 (LOSC). The first part of the module looks at each maritime zone in detail as laid out by LOSC, before moving on to examine regulatory issues in part two, such as: • Whaling • Environmental disasters and the protection of the marine environment • Underwater cultural heritage and the salvage of historic shipwrecks • Fisheries and illegal fishing practices • Piracy • Proliferation of WMDs and arms at sea • Marine scientific research and the mining of resources • Settlement of disputes
  • SXL-3148: Expert Evidence in Court (10) (Semester 2)
  • SXL-3150: Commercial Law (20) (Semester 2)
  • SXL-3153: Canadian Constitutional Law (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
  • SXL-3432: Intro to EU Public Procurement (10) (Semester 1)
    The main areas to be studied include: • Introduction to Public Procurement and EU Procurement Policy. • Procurement under the EU Treaty: objectives and the application of Treaty principles to public procurement: o free movement o equal treatment o transparency and o proportionality • European Union Procurement Directives o evolution of procedural rules on Public Procurement; o the rules on coverage (public sector and utilities) and types of contracts; o the tendering procedures and methods; o the procurement process including specification, advertisement, qualification, invitation to tender and evaluation; o the standstill requirements; o debrief and contract award; o the remedies regime. • Public Procurement in the United Kingdom o evolution of the regime, implication of devolution on the UK public procurement framework; o the key rules on advertisement, pre-qualification, invitation to tender and evaluations, standstill, debriefing and contract award and contract award); o the remedies regime • Community and national initiatives on public procurement, such as the framework on Collaborative Procurement Agenda, Efficiency reforms, Shared Services, and Transparency in Public Procurement; • Special issues – Concession contracts, defence procurement, SMEs, Third Sector organisations
  • SXL-3436: Intro to Interna'l Procurement (10) (Semester 2)
    The “International Procurement Regimes” module involves the study of the main principles, main rules and the functioning of UNCITRAL Model Law on Procurement, the Agreement on Government Procurement (GPA) of the WTO and the procurement rules of selected international finance institutions, all of which have impacted on legal principles in national procurement regimes. Students will gain an appreciation of the main features of international procurement regimes and will be provided with an examination of interesting aspects of the legal regimes, through an integrated study of focusing on the political and economic contexts of the rules and important contemporary developments. Specifically the course of study will involve examination of: 1. The objectives and rationales for regulating procurement 2. The United Nations Model Law on Procurement of Goods, Construction and Services - a model procurement framework? 3. The WTO Agreement on Government Procurement. 4. Regulation of procurement in international finance institutions. 5. Recent regulatory reforms in Public Procurement – examination of experiences from selected countries

40 credits from:

  • HPS-3008: Sociology of Religion (20) (Semester 2)
  • VPR-3205: Hinduism in the Modern World (20) (Semester 1)
  • VPR-3302: Applied Ethics (20) (Semester 1)
    The module will begin with a brief outline of the various ethical challenges which face contemporary society. It will then consider the following issues: (a) world poverty (is it the responsibility of individuals or governments or both to alleviate world poverty?); (b) the arguments justifying an environmental ethic; ethical considerations to be considered in the case of voluntary and non-voluntary euthanasia; the issue of abortion the notion of reverence for human life; war and peace (the just war theory; ethics and nuclear weapons etc.)
  • VPC-3305: Byd Naturiol yng Nghref. y Gor (20) (Semester 2)
    Yn 1967 cyhoeddodd Lynn White erthygl ddylanwadol yn cyhuddo Cristnogaeth o fod yn gyfrifol i raddau helaeth am y problemau amgylcheddol a oedd yn dechrau cael sylw yn y Gorllewin. Bydd y modiwl yn ystyried ymatebion Cristnogaeth i'r awgrym hwn a bydd yn archwilio ei pherthynas hanesyddol â'r byd naturiol. Rhoddir sylw hefyd i amrywiaeth o gysylltiadau eraill rhwng crefydd ac amgylcheddaeth yn y byd Gorllewinol, yn cynnwys y rhai sy'n gysylltiedig â damcaniaeth Gaia, James Lovelock. Ystyrir meysydd penodol sy'n destun pryder amgylcheddol, megis newid hinsawdd a thechnoleg niwclear o ran eu perthynas â thrafodaeth grefyddol a rhoddir sylw i'r rhyngweithio cymhleth rhwng gwleidyddiaeth, amgylcheddaeth a chrefydd yn y maes trafod hwn.
  • VPR-3319: Comp. Philosophy: East/West (20) (Semester 2)
    This module seeks to explore two distinct philosophical traditions: Eastern and Western. Framing the module in a comparative way enables students to identify key relationships and differences that relate to major philosophical themes. In particular, the module begins by defining the comparative philosophical approach, which will be used throughout the course as the means to study the East and the West. The vast majority of the module will be dedicated to examining different metaphysical and ethical concerns. The module will explore several key thematic notions: (1) Reason and Faith (ignorance, knowledge, causation, scepticism, revelation and divinity); (2) Reality (origins, existence, monism, dualism, pluralism and naturalism); (3) Virtue (tradition, divinity, rites, human nature and altruism); (4) Mind (enlightenment, emptiness, transcendence, introspection and immanence).
  • VPR-3330: Ancient Philosophy (20) (Semester 1)
    This module provides a broad overview of, and introduction to, ancient philosophy in the Western tradition. It will cover, mainly in chronological order, the entirety of the ‘ancient’ philosophical era, beginning with the pre-Socratics, moving through Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle, and onwards to Stoicism, some key Roman philosophers, and Neo-Platonism. Emphasis will be put on the connections between ancient philosophy and later philosophical or religious developments, and on the influence that ancient philosophy has had on human thought generally. Historical narrative detail will be included where relevant (e.g., Socrates’ death, the Peloponnesian War, Aristotle and Alexander the Great, etc.) to provide context. Significant emphasis will be placed on the continued relevance that ancient philosophical schools can have for our modern lives, enabling us to overcome adversity and ‘live well’.
  • VPR-3331: 20th Century Phil of Religion (20) (Semester 2)
    The module begins by clarifying the state of the analytic philosophy of religion at the turn of the 20th century, reflecting upon its inheritance of 19th century ‘modernity’. This is contrasted with some concurrent developments in the continental tradition (German Romanticism, Dostoevsky, Nietzsche). This is the context from which, and into which, Wittgenstein speaks. We will cover the early, middle, and late eras of Wittgenstein’s thought, and show the revolutionary impact that his thought had for the philosophy of religion. We track the various directions in which Wittgenstein’s influence was felt; for example, in A. J. Ayer’s verificationism, or those overtly ‘Wittgensteinian’ philosophers of religion such as D. Z. Phillips. The ‘meta-philosophy of religion’ is introduced throughout, as we tackle the question of how best to philosophise about religion.
  • VPR-3332: Faith and Reason (20) (Semester 2)
    The module is composed of two parts, each looking at the interaction of ‘faith’ and ‘reason’. In the first part, I construct a narrative regarding the origins of our modern conception of ‘reason’, contrasting this with our conception of what it is to have ‘faith’. This narrative begins with Francis Bacon and (which is the more usual philosophical starting point) Descartes. I develop this through certain key thinkers of the modern period (Spinoza, Locke, Hume), concluding with the 19th century’s conception of ‘natural theology’. I press the case that a certain conception of ‘reason’ squeezed ‘faith’ out of the picture (along with a great deal of other meaningful dimensions of human life), prompting us to ask whether we must hold to the traditional conception of ‘reason’ at any cost. The second part of the module looks at contemporary examples of the interaction of ‘reason’ and ‘faith’, in the form of the interaction of science and religion. We consider examples of science being used to support religion (‘Intelligent Design’, the ‘Fine Tuning’ argument), and to debunk religion (evolution, the cognitive science of religion), and ask whether science and religion must necessarily be in conflict with each other. No prior philosophical or scientific knowledge is presumed. A brief introduction to quantum theory will be included.
  • VPR-3333: Immanuel Kant (20) (Semester 1)
    This module provides an introduction to the thought of Immanuel Kant. It covers his contributions to metaphysics and epistemology, by discussing his ‘transcendental idealism’. It covers Kant’s significant contributions to ethics, introducing the various formulations of his ‘categorical imperative’. It covers his contributions to the philosophy of religion, in particular his moral argument for belief in God. Throughout the module, I place Kant in the context of the history of philosophy, identifying those key aspects of philosophy to which Kant was responding (i.e., rationalism and empiricism), and those philosophers whose work was shaped by Kant’s legacy. Finally, we reflect on the place Kant’s thought holds in contemporary philosophy, particularly moral philosophy.
  • VPC-3404: Iddewiaeth yn y Byd Modern (20) (Semester 2)
  • VPC-3406: Crefydd yng Nghymru (20) (Semester 1)
  • VPC-3407: Yr Eglwys a'r Iddewon (20) (Semester 1)