Module MSE-1010:
Foundation in Therapeutics

Module Facts

Run by School of Medical Sciences

10 Credits or 5 ECTS Credits

Semester 2

Organiser: Dr Rachel Hallett

Overall aims and purpose

Therapeutics is the branch of medicine which deals with the treatment of disease. This includes pharmacology, which refers to the use of drugs, their action on the body, and their pharmacokinetic profiles. This foundation module will introduce concepts and practices in pharmacology, and the actions and use of medicines in the management of a range of common diseases.

Course content

This foundation module will introduce concepts and practices in pharmacology, and the actions and use of medicines in the management of a range of common diseases. The historical development of medicines charts the beginning of the discipline of pharmacology, and key concepts of pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics underpin the way in which medicines are developed and used today. Specialist pharmacist lecturers will describe the modes of action and use of treatment options for conditions such as diabetes, hypertension, cardiac disorders, respiratory and gastrointestinal diseases.

Learning outcomes mapped to assessment criteria

  threshold

Threshold D- to D+ (40-49%) Basic factual information, largely based on teaching notes, generally accurate but with some errors or gaps.

another level

Satisfactory C- to C+ (50-59%) Reasonably comprehensive coverage, indicating generally accurate understanding, based on lecture material and some core readings.

good

Excellent Good B- to B+ (60-69%) Comprehensive and accurate coverage, showing good use of teaching material and core readings.

Understand the history of drug development.

Threshold D- to D+ (40-49%) Demonstrates a basic understanding of clinical pharmacy and medicine management Satisfactory C- to C+ (50-59%) Demonstrates a reasonable understanding of clinical pharmacy and medicine management. Good B- to B+ (60-69%) Demonstrates a good working knowledge and understanding of Pharmacy and medicine management including the consequences of subscription drugs on the body. Excellent A- to A* (70-100%) Demonstrates a deep knowledge and understanding of Pharmacy and medicine management including the principles of drug action and receptors.

Understand the safe effective and economic use of medicines

Threshold D- to D+ (40-49%) Demonstrates a basic understanding of clinical pharmacy and medicine management Satisfactory C- to C+ (50-59%) Demonstrates a reasonable understanding of clinical pharmacy and medicine management. Good B- to B+ (60-69%) Demonstrates a good working knowledge and understanding of Pharmacy and medicine management including the consequences of subscription drugs on the body. Excellent A- to A* (70-100%) Demonstrates a deep knowledge and understanding of Pharmacy and medicine management including the principles of drug action and receptors.

Understand the pharmacology of commonly used medicines

Threshold D- to D+ (40-49%) Demonstrates a basic understanding of clinical pharmacy and medicine management Satisfactory C- to C+ (50-59%) Demonstrates a reasonable understanding of clinical pharmacy and medicine management. Good B- to B+ (60-69%) Demonstrates a good working knowledge and understanding of Pharmacy and medicine management including the consequences of subscription drugs on the body. Excellent A- to A* (70-100%) Demonstrates a deep knowledge and understanding of Pharmacy and medicine management including the principles of drug action and receptors.

Understand the consequences of using medicines in clinical practice

Threshold D- to D+ (40-49%) Demonstrates a basic understanding of clinical pharmacy and medicine management Satisfactory C- to C+ (50-59%) Demonstrates a reasonable understanding of clinical pharmacy and medicine management. Good B- to B+ (60-69%) Demonstrates a good working knowledge and understanding of Pharmacy and medicine management including the consequences of subscription drugs on the body. Excellent A- to A* (70-100%) Demonstrates a deep knowledge and understanding of Pharmacy and medicine management including the principles of drug action and receptors.

Understand the need for disease management in clinical practice

Threshold D- to D+ (40-49%) Demonstrates a basic understanding of clinical pharmacy and medicine management Satisfactory C- to C+ (50-59%) Demonstrates a reasonable understanding of clinical pharmacy and medicine management. Good B- to B+ (60-69%) Demonstrates a good working knowledge and understanding of Pharmacy and medicine management including the consequences of subscription drugs on the body. Excellent A- to A* (70-100%) Demonstrates a deep knowledge and understanding of Pharmacy and medicine management including the principles of drug action and receptors.

Assessment Methods

Type Name Description Weight
EXAM Multiple Choice Question Exam 60
REPORT Drug report

Students will choose one drug they have learned about from pharmacist lecturers and write a short report, detailing their additional research into:

  • Its formulation (oral, intravenous, inhalant etc)

  • Its specific mode of action (pharmacodynamics)

  • Its pharmacokinetic parameters, and dosing regimen

  • The disease(s) it is indicated for

  • Any associated side effects, contraindications

40

Teaching and Learning Strategy

Hours
Lecture

6 x 2 hour lectures

12
Private study

Directed additional reading, online resources and textbooks to support the lecture material. Students make their own MCQ quizzes to aid revision.

84
Seminar

2 x 2 hour revision seminars, with guidance on drug report assignment and exam preparation.

4

Transferable skills

  • Literacy - Proficiency in reading and writing through a variety of media
  • Numeracy - Proficiency in using numbers at appropriate levels of accuracy
  • Self-Management - Able to work unsupervised in an efficient, punctual and structured manner. To examine the outcomes of tasks and events, and judge levels of quality and importance
  • Exploring - Able to investigate, research and consider alternatives
  • Information retrieval - Able to access different and multiple sources of information
  • Inter-personal - Able to question, actively listen, examine given answers and interact sensitevely with others
  • Argument - Able to put forward, debate and justify an opinion or a course of action, with an individual or in a wider group setting
  • Self-awareness & Reflectivity - Having an awareness of your own strengths, weaknesses, aims and objectives. Able to regularly review, evaluate and reflect upon the performance of yourself and others

Subject specific skills

Biomedical Science benchmarks QAA http://www.qaa.ac.uk/en/Publications/Documents/SBS-Biomedical-sciences-15.pdf

Intellectual skills 4.2 Biomedical sciences graduates should be able to: i recognise and apply subject-specific theories, paradigms, concepts or principles (for example, the relationship between genes and proteins, or the nature of essential similarities and differences between prokaryote and eukaryote cells)

5 Core biomedical sciences knowledge, understanding and skills ii engagement with the essential facts, major concepts, principles and theories associated with the chosen subject v familiarity with terminology, nomenclature and disease classification systems, as appropriate vii awareness of the contribution of their subject to the development of knowledge about the complexity of human health and disease ix engagement with current developments in the biomedical sciences and their applications, and the philosophical and ethical issues involved

5.4 Whatever the precise nature of their specific programme, graduates in the biomedical sciences are expected to have a broad basic understanding of how cells, organs and systems function in the human body in health and disease, the common causes and effects of disease, the body's defence mechanisms and approaches to treatment. These form the foundation for the more in-depth and advanced knowledge specific to their particular programme's focus or specialism within the biomedical sciences (see section 6).

5.5 Biomedical sciences programmes generally include: x Pharmacology: the importance of drug actions in the living organism for prevention and treatment of disease; the principles of drug-receptor interactions and the relationship between dose and response, routes of administration, types of drugs, how drugs are metabolised and eliminated from the body, toxic effects; approaches for drug discovery; personalised medicine

Resources