Module DXX-2004:
Silviculture and Inventory

Module Facts

Run by School of Natural Sciences

20 Credits or 10 ECTS Credits

Semester 1

Organiser: Dr Andy Smith

Overall aims and purpose

The purpose of the module is to develop students' understanding of silviculture, from its principles in tree biology, to its practical application through forest operations. It aims to: - Consolidate understanding of seed, seedling and tree growth, survival and responses to silvicultural interventions; - Explore the silvicultural systems used in temperate and tropical forests to realise desired future conditions; - Examine the practices used in temperate plantation silviculture.

Course content

Physiological processes that determine tree growth and survival: Above- & below-ground allocation; root:shoot ratio; Light capture drives productivity; Drought & water-logging; Mechanisms of disease-related death; Response of seedling trees to environmental stimuli. Tree growth and yield. Plant stress and wood quality. Differences/similarities between individual tree, uneven-aged, mixed stands and plantation silviculture: Single-tree selection; Group selection; Seed trees; Shelterwood; Clearfell. Regeneration: Seed and vegetative regeneration; Re-spacing of natural regeneration; Genetic aspects of regeneration. Tending, thinning. Operational aspects of site preparation, planting and establishment. Silviculture for production: Silviculture and timber properties. Forest harvesting and extraction: Appropriate harvesting methods; Mechanised thinning; Organised felling systems; Forest road planning and layout. Environmental effects of forest operations: Sustainability; Legislation.

Assessment Criteria

threshold

Grade D- to D+ Students have a passing familiarity with the physiological ecology of trees. They can describe some of the silvicultural systems used in temperate or tropical forestry. They will be able to describe some of the methods used for forest inventory and yield regulation and prediction.

good

Grade C- to B+ Students have a good understanding of the physiological ecology of plants, and understand that silvicultural interventions affect plant growth. They can describe many of the silvicultural systems used in temperate and tropical forestry. They will be able to explain several of the ways in which economic methods are used to make forest management decisions, and describe how the methods are applied in different situations.

excellent

Grade A- and above Students have an excellent understanding of the physiological ecology of plants, and understand the all the ways in which silvicultural interventions affect the biotic and abiotic factors that control plant growth. They can describe the silvicultural systems used in temperate and tropical forestry, and critically evaluate their relative merits. They will be able to explain in detail the methods used for forest inventory and yield regulation and describe how the methods are applied in different situations, and evaluate their effectiveness.

Learning outcomes

  1. Understand and describe the biological and environmental factors that underpin the silvicultural practices used to create, establish and tend forest plantations.

  2. Understand and describe the silvicultural systems used in temperate and tropical forests and discuss their relative merits in the context of sustainable forest management.

  3. Understand the principles of forest yield prediction and be able to apply them to a particular forest situation

  4. Understand the principles of forest inventory and forest inventory planning, and be able to apply them to a particular forest situation

Assessment Methods

Type Name Description Weight
COMPREHENSION TEST Computer-based Written Exam

Compute-based written examination using Blackboard.

50
COURSEWORK Remote sensing exercise

You will be required to produce four maps of Treborth forestry management blocks showing:

A. Areas of significant vegetation differences as determined from aerial photography interpretation (RGB and CIR) – 2 maps.
B. Areas of significant differences (canopy structure, tree height) determined from the LiDAR data – 1 map.
C. Any significant features (topographical, hydrological, and archaeological) determined from data derived from the LiDAR data – 1 map.

Your maps will be compiled into a 4-6 page report (determined by the size of your maps). You will need to include coincide detail of your methods and any references you have used. If you attend all the lectures and practical exercises, you will have, all the necessary GIS skills required to complete the report to the highest professional standard.

25
COURSEWORK Treborth inventory

You will write a short (1000 words max) report on an the woodland inventory at Treborth.

25

Teaching and Learning Strategy

Hours
Lecture

13*2 hour lectures

26
Fieldwork

3 x 6 hour field visits

18
Private study

Private and guided self-study

156

Transferable skills

  • Literacy - Proficiency in reading and writing through a variety of media
  • Numeracy - Proficiency in using numbers at appropriate levels of accuracy
  • Computer Literacy - Proficiency in using a varied range of computer software
  • Self-Management - Able to work unsupervised in an efficient, punctual and structured manner. To examine the outcomes of tasks and events, and judge levels of quality and importance
  • Exploring - Able to investigate, research and consider alternatives
  • Information retrieval - Able to access different and multiple sources of information
  • Inter-personal - Able to question, actively listen, examine given answers and interact sensitevely with others
  • Critical analysis & Problem Solving - Able to deconstruct and analyse problems or complex situations. To find solutions to problems through analyses and exploration of all possibilities using appropriate methods, rescources and creativity.
  • Safety-Consciousness - Having an awareness of your immediate environment, and confidence in adhering to health and safety regulations
  • Teamwork - Able to constructively cooperate with others on a common task, and/or be part of a day-to-day working team
  • Management - Able to utilise, coordinate and control resources (human, physical and/or financial)
  • Self-awareness & Reflectivity - Having an awareness of your own strengths, weaknesses, aims and objectives. Able to regularly review, evaluate and reflect upon the performance of yourself and others
  • Leadership - Able to lead and manage, develop action plans and objectives, offer guidance and direction to others, and cope with the related pressures such authority can result in

Subject specific skills

  • Understand the provisional nature of information and appreciate competing and alternative explanations.
  • Collect and record data generated by a diverse range of methods.
  • Demonstrate awareness of the importance of risk assessment and relevant legislation

Resources

Pre- and Co-requisite Modules

Courses including this module