Modules for course CQ83 | BA/ELPSY
BA English Language & Psychology

This is a provisional list of modules to be offered on this course in the 2018–19 academic year.

The list may not be complete, and the final course content may be different.

You can also view the modules offered in the years: 2016–17; 2017–18.

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Year 1 Modules

Compulsory Modules

Semester 1

  • PPP-1001: Psychology as a Science (10)
    Recommended reading for this module is as follows: Dienes, Z. (2008). Understanding Psychology as a Science. London: Pan-McMillan. ISBN: 9780230542310 Gleitman, H., Reisberg, J., & Gross, D. (2010). Psychology (8th Edition). New York, US: W W Norton & Company. ISBN: 9780393116823 British Psychological Association. (2004). Guidelines for minimum standard of ethical approval in psychological research. http://www.bps.org.uk/the-society/code-of-conduct/code-of-conduct_home.cfm Goldacre, B. (2009). Bad Science. UK: Harper Perennial. ISBN: 978-0007284870
  • PPP-1002: Stress & Distress (10)
    Reading List Health Psychology. Core text: Morrison, V., & Bennett, P. (2012). An Introduction to Health Psychology (3rd ed.). Essex: Pearson. The first edition of this text will be suitable. Clinical Psychology. Core text: Kring, A. M., Johnson, S. L., Davison, G. C., & Neale, J. M., (2010/2012). Abnormal Psychology (11th/12th ed.). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley. Previous editions of the core text and other Abnormal Psychology texts will be suitable.
  • PPP-1003: Scientific Writing & Comm I (10)
    Recommended reading for this module is as follows: American Psychological Association. (2010). The Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th Edition).Washington, DC: Author. The general online handbook: Essay Writing Guide; APA & Writing Research Reports; Edit, acknowledgements & choosing resources. Further reading materials and guidance will be provided in class and additional resources will be accessible on Blackboard.
    or
    PCC-1001: Ysgrifennu Gwyddonol I (10)
    Dyma'r deunydd darllen a argymhellir ar gyfer y modiwl hwn: American Psychological Association. (2010). The Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th Edition). Washington, DC: Awdur. Y llawlyfr ar-lein cyffredinol: Arweiniad ar Ysgrifennu Traethodau; APA ac Ysgrifennu Adroddiadau Ymchwil, cydnabyddiaethau a dewis adnoddau. Bydd deunyddiau darllen pellach yn cael eu darparu yn y dosbarth a bydd adnoddau ychwanegol i'w cael ar Blackboard.
  • QXL-1110: Introduction to Language (20) Core
    The course provides an overview of a wide range of topics in the study of natural language, including: 1. What is language? 2. Morphology: words and their structure. 3. Phonetics and Phonology: language sounds and sound systems. 4. Syntax: sentence structure 5. Semantics and Pragmatics: meaning and context 6. Language variation. 7. Language change. 8. Language acquisition 9. Language pathologies 10. Language and the brain Furthermore, the course provides guidance on how to plan & write an essay as well as other assessment methods, and on how to prepare effectively for examinations.

Semester 2

  • PPP-1005: Brain & Mind (10)
    Recommended reading for this module is as follows: Carlson N. R. Physiology of Behaviour (10th Edition) London: Allyn and Bacon. ISBN 9781408227992
  • PPP-1006: Scientific Writing & Comm II (10)
    Recommended reading for this module is as follows: American Psychological Association. (2010). The Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th Edition).Washington, DC: Author. POPPS handbook Further guidance will be provided in class, and additional resources will be made accessible on Blackboard.
    or
    PCC-1003: Ysgrifennu Gwyddonol II (10)
    Dyma'r deunydd darllen a argymhellir ar gyfer y modiwl hwn: American Psychological Association. (2010). The Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th Edition).Washington, DC: Author. Llawlyfr Sgiliau Ymarfer Cyflwyniadau Llafar Seicoleg (POPPS) Rhoddir rhagor o gyfarwyddyd yn y dosbarth, a threfnir i adnoddau ychwanegol fod ar gael ar Blackboard.
  • PPP-1007: Learning to be Happy (10)
    Recommended reading for this module is as follows: Carr A (2003) Positive Psychology: The Science of Happiness and Human Strengths. Brunner-Routledge ISBN-10: 1583919910 Miltenberger, R.G. (2007). Behaviour Modification: Principles and Procedures. (5th edition). Wadsworth. (4th edition also fine). can be brought by chapter.

Optional Modules

40 credits from:

  • QXL-1113: Language and Society (20) (Semester 1)
    Sociolinguistic variability means that people use language in various different ways, depending on their social background and the current situation they are in. We will consider this phenomenon using three interrelated perspectives of studying variability: • Linguistic variables: Which aspects of the English language are variable? • Social (and regional) variables: How do speakers differ & which social aspects lead to using the English language in different ways? • Situational variables: When do speakers use which variants of English? Along these lines, the basic terminology used in this field will be introduced and employed for discussion, and empirical insights gained by sociolinguists will be examined critically.
    or
    QCB-1113: Iaith a Chymdeithas (20) (Semester 1)
  • QXL-1115: Intro to Phonetics & Phonology (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    This class is an introduction to the phonetics of spoken languages, covering articulatory phonetics, acoustics, and introductory phonology. Areas covered include: anatomy of the vocal tract and terminology used to describe speech articulators, articulatory phonetics, with an emphasis on the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) and how to use it to transcribe speech, an introduction to acoustic theory as it relates to speech sounds, the nature of phonological patterns (alternation and phonotactics), melody and prosody, and the structural representation of speakers’ phonological knowledge. The knowledge and skills acquired here will be essential for many other modules and/or projects.
  • QXL-1116: Introduction to Meaning (20) (Semester 2)
    1. Introduction: What is semantics? Meaning - communication and significance. The semiotic triangle: mind language world and meaning. Lexemes. Sense / reference / denotation / connotation. 2. Semantics: Meaning - Word meaning and sentence meaning. Literal versus non literal. Utterance, sentences and propositions. Semantics and pragmatics 3. Meaning, Thought & Reality - Reference: types. Mental representations: concepts, necessary and sufficient conditions, prototypes, and relations between concepts. Linguistic Relativity. Thought & Reality. 4. Semantic Description - Words and grammatical categories. Words and lexical items, Lexical relations (homonymy, polysemy, synonymy, antonymy, hyponymy, meronymy) 5. Sentence Relations and Truth - Logic and truth, Necessary Truth, A Priori truth and Analyticity, Entailment and Presupposition. 6. Pragmatics: Making sense of each other linguistically - Context and Structure 7. Speech Act Theory & the Cooperative Principle 8. Politeness Theories 9. Critical Discourse Analysis 10. Intercultural Pragmatics
  • QXL-1117: Intro to Morphology & Syntax (20) (Semester 2)
    The module will be split between the study of syntax and the study or morphology in the ration 60:40. 1. Morphemes: the parts of a word. 2. Types of affix and affix ordering 3. The productivity of affixation. 4. Word-formation without affixes. 5. Compounding 6. Syntactic classification: Parts of Speech and functional relations. 7. Syntactic structure and Immediate Constituent Analysis. 8. Recursion and the generation of syntactic structure. 9. Heads and their dependents 10. Syntactic relations within the sentence. 11. Relations between sentence types.
  • QCL-1145: Disgrifio'r Gymraeg (20) (Semester 2)
    • Rhannau ymadrodd y Gymraeg • Cystrawen a threfn geiriol sylfaenol y Gymraeg • Morffoleg sylfaenol y Gymraeg • Ffonoleg a seineg (h.y. sain) sylfaenol y Gymraeg a sut i drawsgrifio’r Gymraeg gan ddefnyddio’r IPA • Disgrifio Cymraeg ffurfiol o safbwynt ieithyddol • Cyflwyniad i ddisgrifio tafodieithoedd y Gymraeg mewn modd ieithyddol • Dylanwad y Saesneg ac ieithoedd eraill ar y Gymraeg (e.e. benthyg, ymyrraeth) • Cymharu’r Gymraeg ag ieithoedd lleiafrifol eraill • Dyfodol y Gymraeg o safbwynt gramadegol

Year 2 Modules

Compulsory Modules

Semester 1

  • PPP-2010: Social Psychology (10)
    ONE of the following textbooks will provide you with a basic overview of the topic to support your learning through this course. However, please remember that it is expected that you will read original papers (research or review articles from peer reviewed journals) rather than relying on the textbook whenever possible. Please refer to the word documents that accompany each lecture to see a comprehensive list of original sources in the reference sections – consider these references as your reading lists for each topic. Sutton, R. & Douglas, K. (2013). Social Psychology. London: Palgrave MacMillan. ISBN-10: 0230218032 ISBN-13: 978-0230218031 Hogg, M.A. & G.M. Vaughan. (2011). Social Psychology 6th Edition. London: Prentice Hall. ISBN-10: 0273741144 ISBN-13: 978-0273741145 Please note that the most recent edition of the above textbook is preferred, but the previous edition (5th) is acceptable Aronson, E. (2008). The Social Animal 10th Edition. New York: Worth. ISBN-10: 1429203161 ISBN-13: 978-1429203166
  • PPP-2012: Cognitive Psychology (10)
    Ashcraft, M. H., & Radvansky, G. A. (2010). Cognition. NJ, US: Pearson Education. ISBN 10: 0-13-508168-8 ISBN 13: 978-0-13-508168 Core textbook for the whole module Baddeley. A, D. (1999). Essentials of Human Memory. Hove, England: Psychology Press. ISBN 0863775454 (pbk.) 0863775446 Alternative core textbook for the topic of Memory Styles, E. A. (1997). The Psychology of Attention. Hove UK: Psychology Press. ISBN 0863774652 (PBK) 0863774644 Alternative core textbook for the topic of Attention Goldstein, E.B. (1999). Sensation and Perception. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing. ISBN 0534346804 (alk. paper) Alternative core textbook for the topic of Perception Harley, T. (2009). Talking the talk. Hoboken: Taylor & Francis Alternative core textbook for the topic of Language; ~15 hard copies available in the library, also available as an e-book. The author’s The Psychology of Language textbook offers more advanced coverage of the same topics, for those who wish to delve deeper.
  • PPP-2014: Personality & Indiv Diffs (10)
    Recommended reading for this module includes the following text, however additional texts may be also be given prior to the module and during the module. Maltby, J., Day, L., Macaskill, A. (2013). Personality, Individual Differences and Intelligence. Pearson Education Limited.

Semester 2

  • PPP-2011: Developmental Psychology (10)
    Recommended reading for this module is as follows: Shaffer, D.R., & Kipp, K. (2012). Developmental Psychology: Childhood and Adolescence. (9th Ed.) International Edition. London: Thompson. (Previous edition is also acceptable as they cover much the same ground.) Additional reading will be made available to students through Blackboard. Required reading for each lecture topic will be presented in class.
  • PPP-2013: Biological Psychology (10)
    Reading List All readings Carlson (10th edition) – Physiology of Behavior K & W=Kolb and Whishaw Fundamentals of Human Neuropsychology, 6th edition (in parenthesis page numbers from the 5th edition)
  • PPP-2016: Aspects of Clinical Psychology (10)
    Reading List Core Textbooks Davey, G. (2014). Psychopathology: Research, Assessment and Treatment in Clinical Psychology (BPS Textbooks in Psychology Series). BPS Blackwell The 1st Edition (2008) is also fine, but it may not be completely in line with the 2nd Edition (2014). Journal Articles and additional book chapter readings: A number of core readings will be posted on Blackboard for each module topic, when required. You can also use your Year 1 'Abnormal Psychology' textbook by Kring, Johnson, Davison and Neal (2013).
  • QXL-2222: History of English (20) Core
    1. Studying the History of English. 2. The Sounds and Writing of English 3. Causes and Mechanisms of Language Change. 4. The Indo-European Language Family and Proto-Indo European. 5. Germanic and the Development of English. 6. The Sounds and Words of Old English. 7. The Grammar of Old English. 8. The Rise of Middle English: Words and Sounds 9. The Grammar of Middle English and the Rise of a Written Standard. 10. The Sounds and Inflections of Early Modern English. 11. Early Modern English Verbal Constructions and Eighteenth-Century Prescriptivism. 12. Modern English.

Optional Modules

40 credits from:

  • QXE-2003: Jonson to Johnson (20) (Semester 2)
  • CXC-2008: Ymarfer Ysgrifennu (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    Rhennir myfyrwyr yn grwpiau (fel arfer o 6-8). Bydd y grwpiau'n aros gydag un tiwtor yn y semester cyntaf ac yna'n symud at diwtor arall yn yr ail semester. Gosodir tasg i bob gr p bob wythnos. Gofynnir i bawb ysgrifennu un darn o ryw 400 gair ar amrywiaeth o bynciau (ysgrif, stori, trafodaeth, cyfieithu). Bydd hwn yn cael ei farcio'n fanwl. Bydd pob gr p yn cyfarfod y tiwtor ar awr benodedig bob wythnos. Yn ystod yr awr hon dychwelir gwaith pob aelod o'r gr p iddo, a thrafodir pob camgymeriad neu wendid yng ngwaith yr holl gr p yr wythnos honno. Bydd hyn yn arwain at drafodaethau ymarferol ar sut i ddefnyddio'r Gymraeg. Y bwriad yw sicrhau hyfforddiant trwyadl mewn iaith a mynegiant.
  • QXL-2201: Sounds and Sound Systems (20) (Semester 1)
    1. articulatory phonetics, 2. spectrographic analysis, 3. the interaction of melody and prosody, 4. the nature of phonological rules, 5. the structural representation of speakers’ phonological knowledge.
  • QXL-2202: Meaning, Mind and Truth (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    1) Language, meaning and mind 2) Universals and Variation in Language, Thought & Experience 3) Embodiment and Conceptual structure 4) Encyclopaedic Semantics 5) Metaphor 6) Metonymy 7) Word meaning and radial categories 8) Mental Spaces and Compositional Semantics 9) Conceptual Blending 10) The semantic basis of grammar
  • QXL-2204: Morphosyntax (20) (Semester 2)
    This module provides an intermediate level framework in which to both study and apply key ideas, terms and concepts on the fields of morphology and syntax. There are two goals for this course. The first goal is to introduce students to more advanced ideas and principles central to the study of both morphology and syntax. The second goal is to provide students with the tools to apply the terms and principles to data / problem sets from a range of languages in order to conduct morphological and /or syntactical analysis. The lectures will provide students with the “big picture”, i.e. central ideas are summarized, important terms and principles defined and theoretical implications outlined. In the tutorials, students discuss key elements in detail and reflect on theoretical implications and apply the knowledge gained to cross linguistic examples and/or data sets. The following are representative topics: 1: Review: Introduction, word structure, types of morphemes. 2: Productivity, Inflectional morphology 3: Morphological mappings of grammatical function 4: Grammatical relations 5: Dependency relations 6: Constituent structure 7: Theories of syntax
  • QCL-2245: Ieithyddiaeth Gymraeg (20) (Semester 1)
    • Orthograffeg (sillafu) y Gymraeg • Agweddau canolradd o ffonoleg a seineg y Gymraeg • Agweddau canolradd o gystrawen y Gymraeg • Agweddau canolradd o forffoleg y Gymraeg • Agweddau canolradd o eirfa’r Gymraeg • Treiglo yn y Gymraeg • Agweddau canolradd o dafodieithoedd y Gymraeg • Creu ac astudio corpysau ieithyddol Cymraeg • Y Gymraeg yn y gymdeithas heddiw (e.e. ar y We, teledu) • Symud iaith, newid iaith a marwolaeth iaith o safbwynt gramadegol
  • QXL-2250: Functions of Discourse (20) (Semester 2)
    In the first part of this module we will focus on the theory of Systemic Functional Grammar (SFG) so as to grasp its basic mechanisms, and identify the main lexicogrammatical structures that are available to speakers of English. The second part will be dedicated to issues around discourse and context. We will look at theories and findings based on SFG, and analyse instances of discourse, exploiting theory to gain insights about the meaning and significance of specific linguistic choices for the discourse area they appear in. Along with theory and analysis, we will consider implications for English language education. Whilst lectures will provide the theoretical and conceptual foundations of SFG and SFG based discourse analysis, the tutorials will be used for discussion, case presentations, and exercises as appropriate for each week's topic. The following topics will be covered: 1. Introduction: SFG and its purposes 2. SFG theory: Clause as message – the textual function 3. SFG theory: Clause as exchange – the interpersonal function 4. SFG theory: Clause as representation – the ideational function 5. SFG theory: Above and below the clause 6. SFG theory: Around the clause – cohesion and discourse 7. Interpreting discourse: Approaches and findings using SFG tools 8. Working with discourse: Appraisal 9. Working with discourse: Ideation 10. Working with discourse: Conjunction and identification 11. Interpreting discourse at different levels of proficiency

Year 3 Modules

Optional Modules

60 credits from:

  • QXL-3304: Language Contact & Bilinguals (20) (Semester 2)
    1. the dynamics of language contact, 2. bilingual acquisition 3. speakers’ minds as a locus of contact, 4. transfer effects in bilinguals, 5. language and social subordination, 6. language maintenance in minority language settings, 7. contact-induced language change.
  • QXL-3313: EFL Theory (20) (Semester 1)
    This module provides an overview of TEFL theory by examining a wide range of contexts in which language teaching and learning takes place. Topics will include the following: 1. The use of English within a global context. 2. Language awareness in the classroom. 3. English teaching methodologies. 4. Analysis of teaching English to speakers of other languages based on research articles and DVD material: affective factors and classroom interaction. 5. Implementing and evaluating curriculum change.
  • QXL-3317: First Language Acquisition (20) (Semester 1)
    This module provides an introduction to the study of language development. There are two goals for this course. The first goal is to introduce students to key findings and central debates in the study of language development. The second goal is to provide students with the tools to critically examine the existing literature. The lectures will provide students with the “big picture”, i.e. central topics are summarized, important studies discussed and open questions outlined. In the tutorials, students discuss key studies in detail and reflect on methodologies, results and implications. The following topics will be covered: 1. Early language development 2. Phonological development 3. First language acquisition: Syntactic development 4. Multilingual Acquisition 5. Theories of language development: Constructivist and mentalist approaches 6. Bilingual development 7. Language disorders 8. Developmental neurolinguistics
  • QXL-3320: SLA and Language Teaching (20) (Semester 2)
    The topics covered in this module would be the following: 1. Background to SLA Research 2. Individual differences in L2 users and L2 learners 3. L1 transfer: Code-switching and Second Language Learning 4. Theories of L2 acquisition 5. The role of age in L2 acquisition 6. The goals of language teaching and assessment 7. The L2 user and the native speaker 8. Embedding SLA research into Language teaching
  • QXL-3329: Teaching EFL (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    This module provides an introduction to the teaching of EFL through practice and theory and by examining a range of contexts in which English language teaching and learning takes place. Topics will include the following: 1. The nature of EFL teaching contexts. 2. Methodologies employed in the EFL classroom. 3. The role of the teacher of EFL. 4. Strategies used teaching vocabulary, grammar, writing, speaking, reading & listening. 5. Factors affecting lesson planning and materials choice/design. 6. Reflective practice – evaluating teaching and lesson aims.
  • QXL-3341: Dissertation (40) (Semester 1 + 2)
    Topics vary depending on individual students choices, and the emphasis is on individual study. However, they relate to a wide array of issues in linguistics and/or English Language studies. However, classes will include: • How to formulate a research question • Producing a research proposal • Research methodologies • Statistics
    or
    QCB-3341: Traethawd Hir/Dissertation (40) (Semester 1 + 2)
    Topics vary depending on individual students’ choices. However, they relate to a wide array of issues in linguistics and/or English Language studies.
  • QXL-3343: Language and Communication (20) (Semester 2)
    1. Theories and models of communication 2. Principles of communication and miscommunication 3. Methods of discourse analysis 4. Modes of communication 5. Contexts and areas of communication 6. Public contexts (e.g., media, journalism, political, or scientific discourse) 7. Communication in the internet 8. Classroom discourse 9. Casual contexts 10. Situated and task-based interaction
  • QXL-3347: Language Change (20) (Semester 1)
    1) The History of Grammaticalization. 2) Lexicalization: Lexical Constructionalism. 3) Mechanisms of Change (Reanalysis and Analogy). 4) Pragmatic factors. 5) The Hypothesis of Unidirectionality. 6) Clause-Internal Morphological Changes. 7) Grammaticalization across clauses. 8) Grammaticalization in Situations of Extreme Language Contact. 9) Some Basic issues in Grammaticalization and Construction Grammar. 10) Idioms and Formulaicity.
  • QXL-3349: Psycholinguistics (20) (Semester 2)
    This module provides a basic overview of how the mind and the brain process language. There are two goals for this course. The first goal is to introduce students to key findings and central debates in psycholinguistic research. The second goal is to provide students with the tools to critically examine the existing literature. The lectures will provide students with the “big picture”, i.e. central topics are summarized, important studies discussed and open questions outlined. In the tutorials, students discuss key studies in detail and reflect on methodologies, results and implications. The following topics will be covered: 1: Introduction to Language Science and what is psycholinguistics? 2: Speech production and comprehension 3: Word processing 4: Sentence processing 5: Discourse processing 6: Reference and non-literal language 7: Language Acquisition 8: Reading 9: Bilingualism 10: Aphasia 11: Right Hemisphere Language Functions
  • QCL-3370: Agweddau ar Ddwyieithrwydd (20) (Semester 2)
    • Cymru a’r Gymraeg yn y cyd-destun dwyieithog • Diffinio dwyieithrwydd • Dwyieithrwydd unigol vs. dwyieithrwydd cymdeithasol • Caffael iaith mewn cyd-destun dwyieithog • Addysg ddwyieithog yng Nghymru a thu hwnt • Polisïau iaith yn y cyd-destun dwyieithog Cymreig • Cyfnewid côd o safbwynt cymdeithasol a gramadegol • Agweddau seicoieithyddol o ddwyieithrwydd • Agweddau pobl ar ddwyieithrwydd ac ieithoedd lleiafrifol • Newid iaith, marwolaeth iaith a dyfodol y Gymraeg
  • QXL-3375: Historical Linguistics (20) (Semester 1)
    This module explores the field of historical linguistics and philology from both a theoretical and a practical viewpoint. Students will learn about theories of language change and will learn to critically evaluate studies of historical language change. They will also acquire practical skills in identifying the origins of words and grammar in languages that they know. Lectures will introduce students to the big picture and will provide them with concrete and theoretical examples of the topics being discussed, while seminars will be an opportunity to go deeper into the topics in a student-led pedagogical manner. While the lecturer will provide examples of language change (etc.) from his own experiences, students will be highly encouraged to explore languages of their own choice that they find interesting so as to find their own examples of the kinds of changes being learnt about. The following topics will be covered in the lectures and seminars: • Introduction to historical linguistics and philology, and a history of the field • Etymology and exploring Proto-Indo European • Sound change • Semantic change • Syntactic and morphological change • Reconstructive analysis and the comparative method • Issues in Germanic Philology • Issues in Celtic Philology • Historical Linguistics versus contemporary Linguistics (issues in data collation/collection and analysis)

60 credits from:

  • PLP-3001: Applied Behaviour Analysis (20) (Semester 2)
    Recommended reading for this module is as follows: Skinner, B. F. (1974). About Behaviorism. New York: Alfred Knopf. Daniels, A. C. (2000). Other People's Habits: How to Use Positive Reinforcement to Bring Out the Best in People Around You. New York: McGraw-Hill. www.behavior.org Additional readings will be placed on Blackboard for students to download, or given out in class.
  • PMP-3001: Intro to MBA (20) (Semester 2)
    The following reading is recommended for this module. We will put handouts and key articles on blackboard. Essential reading Williams M., Penman D., Mindfulness 2011 – Finding Peace in a Frantic World Kabat-Zinn, J. 1990, Full Catastrophe Living: Using the Wisdom of Your Body and Mind to Face Stress, Pain and Illness, Delta. Williams, J.M.G, Teasdale, J., Segal, Z.V., Kabat-Zinn, J, 2007, The Mindful Way Through Depression: freeing yourself from chronic unhappiness. Guilford Press. Crane, R.S., 2009, Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy: Distinctive features. Routledge. Suggested reading Baer, R. E., 2005, Mindfulness-Based Treatment Approaches, First Edition: Clinician's Guide to Evidence Base and Applications (Practical Resources for the Mental Health Professional); Academic Press. Santorelli, S, 1999, Heal Thyself: Lessons on Mindfulness in Medicine, Bell Tower. Segal, Z.V., Williams, J.M.G. & Teasdale, J.D, 2002, Mindfulness–based Cognitive Therapy for Depression. A New Approach to Preventing Relapse. Guilford Press. Sarah, S., 2012, The Mindfulness Breakthrough, Watkins Publishing
  • PHP-3002: Psyc of Addictive Behaviours (20) (Semester 1)
    Reading List A reading list will be distributed at the start of the course.
  • PLP-3002: Brain and Language (20) (Semester 2)
    Reading List The following is a list of recommended course reference books for use as background/supplementary reading. There is no assigned textbook. A detailed week-by-week list of readings for the weekly seminars will be distributed in Week 1. Readings will be available through the library (either in hard copy or electronically) and/or via the module Blackboard site. Goldrick, Ferreira, & Miozzo (2014). The oxford Handbook of Language Production. Oxford University Press. Harley, T. A. (2014). The Psychology of Language (4th edition). Psychology Press. Hillis, A. E. (2002). The handbook of adult language disorders. Psychology press. http://aalfredoardila.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/ardila-a-2014-aphasia-handbook-miami-fl-florida-international-university1.pdf
  • PSP-3002: Evolution & Human Soc Beh (20) (Semester 1)
    Reading List Required texts are: The Selfish Gene by Richard Dawkins, and The Mating Mind, by Geoffrey Miller Students will be provided with reading lists for each lecture. Other required and recommended readings include approximately 0-4 journal articles per week, all freely available through the university library website. Students may find the book In Your Face, by David Perrett helpful for the second half of the course.
  • PLP-3003: Evidence-based Ed. Methods (20) (Semester 1)
    Recommended reading for this module is as follows: All reading for this module will be available in Blackboard using Talis Aspire. Additionally, there will be readings made available as PDF publications as well as web links to useful resources from within Blackboard. Following is a list of all library books purchased for this module, though you may choose to not read all of them: Barrett, B. H. (2002). The technology of teaching revisited: A reader's companion to B. F. Skinner's book. Concord, MA: Cambridge Centre for Behavioral Studies. Flesch, R. (1986). Why Johnny can't read: And what you can do about it: Harper Paperbacks. Johnson, K. R., & Street, E. M. (2004). The Morningside model of generative instruction: What it means to leave no child behind. Concord, MA: Cambridge Centre for Behavioral Studies. Johnson, K. R., & Street, E. M. (2013). Response to Intervention and Precision Teaching: Creating synergy in the classroom. London: The Guilford Press. (Available as e-book in our library). Johnston, J. M., & Pennypacker, H. S. (2004). Strategies and tactics of behavioral research (3rd ed.): Routledge. Kubina, R. M., & Yurich, K. K. L. (2012). The Precision Teaching Book. Lemont, PA: Greatness Achieved. Lindsley, O. R. (2010). Skinner on measurement. Kansas City: KA: Behavior Research Company. Maloney, M. (1998). Teach your children well: A solution to some of North America's educational problems. Cambridge, MA: Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies. Moran, D. J., & Malott, R. W. (Eds.). (2004). Evidence-based educational methods. California: Elsevier Academic Press. (Available as e-book in our library). Peal, R. (2014). Progressively worse: The burden of bad ideas in British schools. London: Civitas. Pennypacker, H. S., Gutierrez Jr, A., & Lindsley, O. R. (2003). Handbook of the Standard Celeration Chart: Deluxe edition. Concord, MA: Cambridge Center for the Behavioral Sciences. Skinner, B. F. (1968). The technology of teaching: Appleton Century Crofts. Snider, V. E. (2006). Myths and misconceptions about teaching: What really happens in the classroom. Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield Education. Stein, M., Silbert, J., & Carnine, D. (2005). Designing effective mathematics instruction: A direct instruction approach (4th ed.). Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Prentice Hall. Vargas, J. S. (2009). Behavior analysis for effective teaching. New York: Routledge.
  • PCP-3004: Cognitive Neuroscience (20) (Semester 2)
    Reading List Many of the topics covered are discussed in Gazzaniga, M., Ivry, R., & Mangun, G., (2008), Cognitive Neuroscience: The biology of Mind (3rd Edition). MIT Press. Shallice, T. & Cooper, R.P. (2011). The organization of mind. Oxford University Press. Additional readings will be given in class.
  • PCP-3005: Consumer & Applied Psychology (20) (Semester 2)
    Readings Possibly Required (still TBD): Blackwell, R.D., Miniard, P.W., & Engel, J.F (2006). Consumer Behavior, 10th edition. International Student Edition. Mason, Ohio: Thomson Higher Education. ISBN: 0324271972 Possibly Required (still TBD): Case studies (About 1 per week – mostly included in required text). Scientific Papers (About 1 per week - distributed during the course). Recommended: Strunk and White, The Elements of Style. Available for ~£6 or online at: http://www.bartleby.com/141/
  • PHP-3008: Counselling Skills (20) (Semester 2)
    The following textbook will provide you with a core overview of the topic to support your learning through this course. However, please remember that it is expected that you will read original papers (research or review articles from peer reviewed journals) rather than relying on the textbook whenever possible. Short, F. E., & Thomas, P. (2014). Core Approaches in Counselling and Psychotherapy. Routledge: UK. Additional readings for those who are interested in this topic are as follows: British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy. (1992). Ethical Framework for Good Practice in Counselling and Psychotherapy. Guidelines available online at the BACP website: http://www.bacp.co.uk/ethical_framework British Psychological Association. (2006). Code of Ethics and Conduct. Guidelines available online at the BPS website: http://www.bps.org.uk/the-society/code-of-conduct/code-of-conduct_home.cfm Rogers, C. (1951). Client Centred Therapy: Its Current Practice, Implications and Theory. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin College. ISBN-13 978-1841198408 ISBN-10: 1841198404 Recommended book for Person-Centred Therapy Freud, S. (1949). The Ego and the Id. London: The Hogarth Press Ltd. ISBN-10: 1578988675 ISBN-13: 978-1578988679 Recommended book for Psychoanalytic Therapy Beck, A. T. (1975). Cognitive Therapy and the Emotional Disorders. Oxford, England: International Universities Press. ISBN-10: 0140156895 ISBN-13: 978-0140156898 Recommended book for Cognitive Therapy Egan, G. (2007). The Skilled Helper. Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole. ISBN-10: 0495604313 ISBN-13: 978- 0495604313 Recommended book for Therapeutic Models Ellis, A. (1997). A Guide to Rational Living. US: Albert Ellis Institute. ISBN-10: 0879800429 ISBN-13: 978-0879800420 Recommended book for Rational Emotive Behaviour Therapy Berne, E. (1964). Games People Play. New York, US: Ballantine Books. ISBN-10: 0141040270 ISBN-13: 978-0141040271 Recommended book for TA Bandler, R. & Grinder, J. (1979). Frogs into Princes: Neuro Linguistic Programming. Moab, UT: Real People Press. ISBN-10: 0911226192 ISBN-13: 978-0911226195 Recommended book for NLP James, L. (2007). Tigger on the Couch. ISBN-13 978-0007248957 ISBN-10: 0007248954 Recommended book for a little bit of fun If you would like more information about this module (content or teaching methods), please do not hesitate to contact Dr Fay Short.