Module XAE-2041:
Adolescence

Module Facts

Run by School of Education and Human Development

20 Credits or 10 ECTS Credits

Semester 2

Organiser: Dr Anne-Marie Smith

Overall aims and purpose

This module discusses the issues faced by young people as they navigate adolescence. The module will build on previous discussions of child development to consider how young people continue to develop as they approach adulthood. The various factors which may influence adolescent development will be considered, including the role of society, culture, the media and law. Specific, contemporary issues which are relevant to adolescence and young people will be explored such as the impact of the internet and social media, sex education and sexualisation, puberty and peer pressure. This module will complete the discussions of children’s transition to adulthood and set the foundation for modules in year 3 which discuss specific issues faced by young people.

Course content

This module will consider the following: - How do children become adolescents and adults? - Health and Behaviour. - The relationship between young people and adults. - Youth and Technology. - The development of gender identity. - Global perspectives of youth. - Sex, Drugs and Rock’n’Roll…

Assessment Criteria

threshold

(D-, D, D+): A satisfactory understanding of current theories of adolescent development. Demonstrate an ability to discuss the key issues in adolescent health and well-being based on satisfactory research evidence. Show a basic awareness of the relationship between society and young people in terms of the media, individual adults and organisations. Consider the relationship between relevant theory and contemporary issues in young people’s experience.

good

(C-, C, C+): A good understanding of current theories of current theories of adolescent development. Demonstrate a good ability to discuss the key issues in adolescent health and well-being on the basis of reliable research evidence. Show a sound awareness of the relationship between society and young people in terms of the media, individual adults and organisations. Show a considered ability to evaluate the relationship between relevant theory and contemporary issues in young people’s experience.

excellent

(A-, A, A+, A*): A comprehensive understanding of current theories of adolescent development. Demonstrate an ability to thoroughly discuss the key issues in adolescent health and well-being on the basis of extensive background research. Show a thorough awareness of the relationship between society and young people in terms of the media, individual adults and organisations. Show an excellent ability to evaluate the relationship between relevant theory and contemporary issues in young people’s experience.

Learning outcomes

  1. Discuss the relationship between young people and adults both within families and within the wider, societal context.

  2. Discuss the key issues which are involved in ensuring adolescent health and well-being.

  3. Evaluate the impact of societal and cultural factors on young people’s development and experience of adolescence.

  4. Identify and evaluate a range of contemporary issues which relate to youth and the adolescent experience.

  5. Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of adolescent development from childhood to adulthood.

Assessment Methods

Type Name Description Weight
Annotated Guide to Adolescence 50
Written assignment 50

Teaching and Learning Strategy

Hours
Lecture

11 @ 2 hours/week

22
Seminar

11 @ 1 hours/week

11
Private study 167

Transferable skills

  • Literacy - Proficiency in reading and writing through a variety of media
  • Computer Literacy - Proficiency in using a varied range of computer software
  • Self-Management - Able to work unsupervised in an efficient, punctual and structured manner. To examine the outcomes of tasks and events, and judge levels of quality and importance
  • Exploring - Able to investigate, research and consider alternatives
  • Information retrieval - Able to access different and multiple sources of information
  • Inter-personal - Able to question, actively listen, examine given answers and interact sensitevely with others
  • Critical analysis & Problem Solving - Able to deconstruct and analyse problems or complex situations. To find solutions to problems through analyses and exploration of all possibilities using appropriate methods, rescources and creativity.
  • Presentation - Able to clearly present information and explanations to an audience. Through the written or oral mode of communication accurately and concisely.
  • Teamwork - Able to constructively cooperate with others on a common task, and/or be part of a day-to-day working team
  • Caring - Showing concern for others; caring for children, people with disabilities and/or the elderly
  • Argument - Able to put forward, debate and justify an opinion or a course of action, with an individual or in a wider group setting
  • Self-awareness & Reflectivity - Having an awareness of your own strengths, weaknesses, aims and objectives. Able to regularly review, evaluate and reflect upon the performance of yourself and others

Subject specific skills

  • reflect upon a range of psychological sociological health historical and philosophical perspectives and consider how these underpin different understandings of babies and young children and childhood
  • apply multiple perspectives to early childhood issues recognising that early childhood studies involves a range of research methods theories evidence and applications
  • integrate ideas and findings across the multiple perspectives in early childhood studies and recognise distinctive early childhood studies approaches to relevant issues
  • evaluate competing positions in relation to the construction of babies and young children and childhood by different subjects societal agents and time place and culture
  • constructively critique theories practice and research in the area of child development
  • critically explore examine and evaluate the significance of the cultural historical and contemporary features of various policies institutions and agencies in regard to babies young children and childhood

Resources

Talis Reading list

http://readinglists.bangor.ac.uk/modules/xae-2041.html

Reading list

Key Text:

Arnett, J. & Hughes, M. (2012) Adolescence and Emerging Adulthood: A Cultural Approach. Harlow: Pearson Education Limited.

Additional Reading:

Coleman, J.C. (2011) The Nature of Adolescence (4th Ed) Hove: Routledge

Côté J. (2014) Youth Studies: Fundamental Issues and Debates Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan

Coy, M., Kelly, L., Elvines, F., Garner, M. & Kanyeredzi, A. (2013) “Sex Without Consent, I Suppose that is Rape”: How Young People in England Understand Sexual Consent.” Office of the Children’s Commissioner.

Furlong, A. (2009) Handbook of Youth and Young Adulthood: New Perspectives and Agendas. Abingdon: Routledge

Moore, S.E.H. (2012) ‘Controlling passion? A review of recent developments in British sex education.’ Health, Risk & Society, vol.14, no.1, pp.25-40

Rothman, E. F., Kaczmarsky, C., Burke, N., Jansen, E. & Baughman, A. (2015) “Without porn… I wouldn’t know half the things I know now”: A qualitative study of pornography use among a sample of urban, low-income, black and Hispanic youth.’ The Journal of Sex Research, vol.52, no.7, pp. 736-746.

Ruddock, A. (2013) Youth and Media London: SAGE

Soller, B. (2014) ‘Caught in a bad romance: adolescent romantic relationships and mental health.’ Journal of Health and Social Behavior, vol.55, no.1, pp.56-72

Volpe, E.M., Morales-Alemán, M.M. & Teitelman, A.M. (2014) ‘Urban adolescent girls’ perspectives on romantic relationships: initiation, involvement, negotiation, and conflict.’ Issues in Mental Health Nursing, vol.35, pp. 776-790.

Courses including this module