Modiwlau cwrs LL53 | BA/HSCS
BA Health & Social Care/Sociology

Modiwlau Blwyddyn 1

Modiwlau Gorfodol

Semester 1

  • SXU-1003: Understanding Society (20)
    This module introduces students to Sociology. The module runs over two semesters giving students a comprehensive sociological foundation to some of the key sociological issues and debates. The module introduces following aspects of social sciences: Semester 1 The nature of social sciences and relations between key disciplines and methods (2 weeks). Interaction and communication (2 weeks) Life course and the family (2 weeks) Gender and socialisation (2 weeks) Culture and media (2 weeks) Semester 2 Social stratification, Education and work (2 weeks) Organisations and institutions (2 weeks) The environment, urbanisation (2 weeks) Political Sociology and social movements (2 weeks) Globalisation (2 weeks)
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    SCS-1004: Cymdeithaseg a'r Byd Cyfoes (20)
    Ceir cyflwyniad i'r prif theorïau cymdeithasegol, gan ganolbwyntio ar bersbectifau ffwythiannaeth a theori gwrthdaro. Edrychir ar waith Emile Durkheim a Karl Marx a'u gwaith arloesol mewn ffurfio theorïau cymdeithasegol cynnar. Yna edrychir ar sefydliadau cymdeithasol yn y gymdeithas gyfoes, gan gymhwyso'r theorïau a'r persbectifau at ddadansoddi sefydliadau fel y teulu, addysg, gwaith a dosbarth cymdeithasol.
  • NHS-1202: Health & Welfare Issues (20)

Semester 2

Modiwlau Opsiynol

40 credyd allan o:

  • HPS-1001: From Cradle to Grave (20) (Semester 2) neu
    HAC-1001: Y Wladwriaeth Les (20) (Semester 2)
  • HPS-1002: Power, Freedom & the State (20) (Semester 2)
  • HPS-1004: Death of God (20) (Semester 2)
  • HPS-1005: Existentialism (20) (Semester 1)
  • SXY-1005: Introduction to Criminology (20) (Semester 2)
    This module is intended to provide Level One students with a thorough familiarity with the major ways of thinking about crime, with reference to some of the main theoretical perspectives within criminology. This module provides an introduction to criminological thought, ranging from classical to strain theories of crime. Theoretical perspectives have been developed in an attempt to explain why people commit crime, and the history of thought on this question will be examined. The module considers the shifting definitions of crime over time and space, and explores the ways in which society responds to crime and criminals. Empirical concerns are likely to include the role of the media in crime construction, the use and abuse of drugs, the experiences of victims of crime and attitudes towards white-collar and organised crime.
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    SCY-1004: Cyflwyniad i Droseddeg (20) (Semester 2)
    Mae'r fodiwl yn eich cyflwyno at faes trosedd a chyfiawnder troseddol. Trafodir theorïau a themau allweddol a ddefnyddir i egluro ymddygiad droseddol sy'n cynnwys esboniadau clasurol i'r rhai mwyaf cyfoes; y mesurau a ddatblygwyd i atal trosedd, ynghyd â gorolwg o'r system gyfiawnder troseddol sy'n cynnwys prif asiantaethau cyfiawnder troseddol, datblygiad hanesyddol, strwythur ac atebolrwydd y system.
  • HPS-1006: Ess. Skills for Ac. Success (20) (Semester 1) neu
    HAC-1006: Ess. Skills for Ac. Success (20) (Semester 1)
  • SXY-1007: Intro to Criminal Justice (20) (Semester 1)
    Part One of this module is intended to provide Level One students with a sound understanding of the ways in which in England and Wales, crime comes to the attention of the authorities, how crime is measured and investigated, how accused persons are brought to trial, and those who are convicted are sentenced and punished. This module takes an historical view of criminal law, the police, the criminal courts and the prision system, examining the significant social, economic, and philosophical changes that have helped to shape the modern criminal justice and penal systems. It examines the functions of the criminal justice agencies, explores some of the predominant ideas and theories about how the system operates and raises critical questions about the ways in which criminal justice is done and punishment is delivered. In Part Two the aim is to provide students with a thorough familiarity of major ways of thinking about crime, with reference to some of the main theoretical perspectives within criminology. This module provides an introduction to a range of criminological thought. Theoretical perspectives have been developed in an attempt to explain why people commit crime, and the history of thought on this question will be examined. The module considers the shifting definitions of crime and to offenders. Empirical concerns are likely to include to role of the media in crime construction, the use and abuse of drugs, the experiences of victims of crime and attitudes towards white-collar and organised crime.
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    SCY-1002: Cyflwyniad i Gyf Troseddol (20) (Semester 1)
    Cyflwyniad i'r modd yr ymchwilir i drosedd yn Lloegr a Chymru, triniaeth y sawl sydd wedi eu cyhuddo ac ar brawf, yr euogfarnedig a systemau cosb. Edrychir yn hanesyddol ar wreiddiau cyfraith troseddol, llysoedd a'r carchar ynghyd â sut mae newid economaidd, athronyddol a chymdeithasol wedi siapio'r system gyfiawnder a chosb. Trafodir swyddogaethau'r asiantaethau cyfiawnder troseddol, prif syniadau a theoriau ar weithredu'r systemau, a chwestiynir yn feirnadol y modd y trosglwyddir cyfiawnder a chosb.

Modiwlau Blwyddyn 2

Modiwlau Gorfodol

Semester 1

  • SXU-2001: Social & Political Research (20)
    This module is an introduction to social research. Primarily it is a practical course in the practices of research in social science. Covering the main elements of research design, question formulation, data collection and analysis it informs students of good practice in the area of survey design, cases studies and evaluation methods.
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    SCU-2001: Dulliau Ymchwil (20)
    Edrychir ar seiliau athronyddol ymchwil gymdeithasol, a'r gwahanol ddulliau sy'n deillio ohonynt. Trwy ddefnyddio'r syniad o'r 'Broses Ymchwil Ddelfrydol', gwelir sut mae angen datblygu bob cam o ymchwil maes mewn modd disgybledig a gofalus, er mwyn sicrhau dilysrwydd a dibynadwyedd. Ystytir sut i weithrediadu cysyniadau, adolygu'r lenyddiaeth berthnasol, ffurfio'r broblem i'w hastudio, diffinio'r newidynnau, creu damcaniaeth, dethol dulliau addas, samplo, a chreu offeryn ymchwil (holiadur/atodlen gyfweld).
  • SXS-2035: Classical Social Theory (20)
    The module introduces the classic contributions of Marx, Tocqueville, Tonnies, Weber, Durkheim and Simmel and the development of their thinking concerning modernity, capitalism, rationalisation and bureaucracy, and the question of moral and social order. The module then considers how the classic tradition has been transformed and new paths have been pursued in the contexts of Parsons' 'system theory', symbolic interactionism, critical theory and feminist social theory.
  • NHS-2202: Comparative Health & Welfare (20)

Semester 2

  • SXS-2011: Identity & Diversity (20)
    The structure of the module covers following topics: 1. The nature of social diversity and identies. 2. The scope of social inequalities in the global, national and local contexts; 3. the class and economic inequalities; 4. Gender inequalities and sexualities; 5. Race and ethnicities; 6. Nationality; 7. Consumer culture and subcultures 8. New types of inequalities in global age.
  • NHS-2201: Sociology of Health (20)

Modiwlau Opsiynol

20 credyd allan o:

  • SXU-2002: Cont. Social and Political Deb (20) (Semester 1)
    There will be no set curriculum - rather this will emerge each time the module is taught depending on staff and student interests. The approach adopted will be to devote the first workshop to identifying themes and issues to be addressed, and to draw up the curriculum for that academic session in collaboration between staff and students. The workshop style of teaching and learning will allow emerging issues and contemporary debates to be addressed. Possible topics to be covered: Should drugs be legalised? Social control and the media Thinking critically about criminology Should there be a sociology of the environment? Exploring disaster capitalism Girls will be girls and boys will be boys – debunking the myth of gender. Exploring the relationship between inequality and capitalism Radicalisation, immigration, identity and racism. The Arab Spring Riots and civil liberties Thinking beyond the norm – the rationalization of ‘them’ and ‘us’
  • SXY-2004: Crime & the Media (20) (Semester 2)
    Media stories on crime and law are numerous. They form an object of inexhaustible interest to audiences. Many people learn about crime and law from the media, especially from newspapers, books and films. Media portrayals often contributed decisively to changes in public opinion and politics. Also, deviant behaviour can be influenced by media. Media construct deviance (e.g. by identifying `folk devils`), but media also offer cultural templates for people involved in deviant activities. The class deals with the cultural and political significance of media portrayals of crime and law. Students learn about economic, political, legal and other backgrounds. Major narratives employed by the media will be identified. The standard patterns of telling and other technical means of the media are analysed. The audience's reaction to media portrayals and its use of media also form a topic for the class.
  • HPS-2008: Sociology of Religion (20) (Semester 2)
  • SXP-2010: World Poverty and Inequality (20) (Semester 2)
    This module will examine the explanations for, and the experience of, poverty in the UK and in comparative perspective. It will aim to address the following aspects: 1. Defining poverty – how is poverty defined? What is social exclusion? How important is inequality? 2. Explaining poverty - how has the persistence of poverty been explained? This will look particularly at ‘pathological’ explanations involving a ‘culture of poverty’ or the existence of an ‘underclass’ 3. The risk of poverty – who is most at risk of being poor, and what are the possible consequences? 4. Experiencing poverty - what does it mean to be poor in the UK today? 5. Dimensions of poverty - what are the various dimensions of poverty, including income, wealth, health, education and housing. 6. International issues – can we ‘make poverty history’? 7. Confronting poverty – what policies are most effective against poverty? Is poverty or inequality the real problem?
  • HPS-2011: Paradoxes of Self: Nietz./Jung (20) (Semester 1)
  • SXP-2040: Social Work Perspectives (20) (Semester 2)
    1. What is Social Work? Describing and defining Social Work. 2. You and Social Work. What do Social Workers do and where do they work? 3. Values and Ethics for Social Work. Codes of Practice for Social Work Practice. 4. The Legal and Organisational context in which the Social Work process occurs. 5. Research and service user and carer experiences – analysing serious case reviews in social work and how they inform current social work practice. 6. Anti -oppressive practice. Identity and understanding oppression and the many faces of oppression in society. 7. Social work process: Assessment: Theories and Models (Questioning model, Procedural model, Exchange model and Narrative) Assessment of Risk and Need; Assessment and Oppression; Multi-disciplinary assessment. 8. Social Work process: Systems Theory as an underpinning approach to social work interventions; User participation; Theories of Empowerment; Advocacy, Negotiation and Partnership. 9. Social Work processes: Communication- Interviewing skills and structure; Questioning; Responding; Barriers; Using interpreters; Interviewing children. 10. Social Work processes: Reflective practice; Review stages in social work; Endings.
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    SCP-2040: Safbwyntiau GC (20) (Semester 2)
    1. What is Social Work? Describing and defining Social Work. 2. You and Social Work. What do Social Workers do and where do they work? 3. Values and Ethics for Social Work. Codes of Practice for Social Work Practice. 4. The Legal and Organisational context in which the Social Work process occurs. 5. Research and service user and carer experiences – analysing serious case reviews in social work and how they inform current social work practice. 6. Anti -oppressive practice. Identity and understanding oppression and the many faces of oppression in society. 7. Social work process: Assessment: Theories and Models (Questioning model, Procedural model, Exchange model and Narrative) Assessment of Risk and Need; Assessment and Oppression; Multi-disciplinary assessment. 8. Social Work process: Systems Theory as an underpinning approach to social work interventions; User participation; Theories of Empowerment; Advocacy, Negotiation and Partnership. 9. Social Work processes: Communication- Interviewing skills and structure; Questioning; Responding; Barriers; Using interpreters; Interviewing children. 10. Social Work processes: Reflective practice; Review stages in social work; Endings.
  • SXP-2050: Issues in Equality (20) (Semester 1)
    Workshop topics include: How to help young people who are not in education, employment or training needs (NEETS); Encouraging more men into in care related professions; How to create inclusive work places for transgender employees and understanding/tackling hate crime.
  • HGH-2138: Europe 1945-1992 (20) (Semester 1)
  • VPR-2301: 20th Century Phil of Religion (20) (Semester 2)
    The module begins by clarifying the state of the analytic philosophy of religion at the turn of the 20th century, reflecting upon its inheritance of 19th century ‘modernity’. This is contrasted with some concurrent developments in the continental tradition (German Romanticism, Dostoevsky, Nietzsche). This is the context from which, and into which, Wittgenstein speaks. We will cover the early, middle, and late eras of Wittgenstein’s thought, and show the revolutionary impact that his thought had for the philosophy of religion. We track the various directions in which Wittgenstein’s influence was felt; for example, in A. J. Ayer’s verificationism, or those overtly ‘Wittgensteinian’ philosophers of religion such as D. Z. Phillips. The ‘meta-philosophy of religion’ is introduced throughout, as we tackle the question of how best to philosophise about religion.

Modiwlau Blwyddyn 3

Modiwlau Gorfodol

Semester 1

  • SXS-3003: Theorizing Society & Politics (20)
    This module explores the origins, nature and significance of sociological theories and concepts developed in the 20th and 21st century. It examines the strengths and weaknesses of such approaches as critical theory (Adorno, Horkheimer, Marcuse et al) structuralism and neo-structuralism (Levi-Strauss, Foucault, Bourdieu), and feminist standpoint theory. It considers a range of theories which seek to address knowledge, power and subordination in terms of gender divisions and differences of class, race or sexuality. The module seeks to ask questions about the relationship between social theory, social action, sociological research and everyday life. This in turn encourages students to reflect on their own position as participants in social interaction.
  • SXS-3030: Globalisation & Social Change (20)
    Topics include: • theories of social change • demographical changes to the modern societies • debating and explaining globalisation • migration • capitalism and globalisation • politics, the state and globalisation • power and inequality in the global economy • globalisation movements • global culture
  • NHS-3201: Mental health & Society (20)

Semester 2

Modiwlau Opsiynol

20 credyd allan o:

20 credyd allan o:

  • HPS-3001: Work Placement - Semester 1 (20) (Semester 1) neu
    HAC-3001: Lleoliad Gwaith - Semester 1 (20) (Semester 1)
  • HAC-3002: Addysg yn y Gymru Gyfoes (20) (Semester 1)
  • HPS-3003: Race democracy * pol ideaology (20) (Semester 2)
  • HPS-3006: Dissertation (40) (Semester 1 + 2) neu
    HAC-3006: Traethawd Hir (40) (Semester 1 + 2)
  • SXU-3010: Dissertation (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    The dissertation is a substantial piece of work. The completed dissertation submitted at level 6 (year 3) consists of a written piece of work of 10,000 words. Within this module students will build on work begun at level 5, and work towards the completion of the dissertation. This will involve the refinement or expansion of the literature review begun at level 5, and will include discussion of major themes arising from the literature. Research for the dissertation may include a small amount of primary empirical research, for example a qualitative or quantitative study conducted by the student under the direction of their supervisor. Throughout the module, students will be engaged mainly in developing their analysis of the literature and any other data collected, and in writing the dissertation.
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    SCU-3010: Traethawd Hir (20) (Semester 1 + 2)
    Mae Traethawd Hir yn ddarn sylweddol o waith, yn cael ei gwblhau ar lefelau 2 a 3. Mae'r traethawd terfynol tua 10,000 o eiriau, ac yn cael ei gyflwyno yn y drydedd flwyddyn. Mae'n cyfrif fel pedair modiwl tuag at eich dyfarniad gradd terfynol. Yn y modiwl yma, byddwch yn parhau a'r gwaith a gychwynwyd gennych ar Lefel 2, a byddwch yn mynd ati i gwblhau'r Traethawd Hir. Bydd hyn yn cynnwys datblygu'r adolygiad llenyddiaeth a gychwynwyd gennych eisoes ar Lefel 2, sy'n trafod prif themau eich testun. Mae'n bosib y byddwch wedi cwblhau rhywfaint o ymchwil gwreiddiol (ond mae hyn yn opsiynol) - er enghraifft, peth gwaith ymchwil meintiol neu ansoddol gwreiddiol y byddwch wedi ei gynnal gyda chymorth a chyfarwyddyd eich goruchwyliwr/aig. Drwy gydol y modiwl, byddwch yn datblygu eich dadansoddiad o'r lenyddiaeth ac unrhyw ddata a gasglwyd, ac yn ysgrifennu eich traethawd.
  • HPS-3011: Paradoxes of Self: Nietz..Jung (20) (Semester 1)
  • SXY-3015: Crime & Power (20) (Semester 2)
    State crimes: from ghettos to genocide. How does criminology and criminal justice respond when it is the formal State who offends? How do we define crime, justice and victimisation in this context? Transnational and organised crimes: human trafficking and the international trade in sexual services and illegal substances are examples of crimes which transcend national boundaries. Interpersonal levels of crime and power: examples may include ‘honour’-based violence and coercion; homophobic hate crimes; gender violence in intimate relationships; what happens when the victim becomes the offender as in the case of battered women who kill? How do the law, society and criminal justice system respond to these forms of crime?
  • SXS-3040: Gender Perspectives (20) (Semester 2)
    Conceptualizing gender Feminisms Men and masculinities Social movements Families, intimacy and sexuality Gender and schooling Gender and work Gender and the media Representations of gender in popular culture Cyberspace and technology Methodologies Gender mainstreaming Gender from a worldwide perspective
  • SXP-3210: Issues in Housing (20) (Semester 1)
    This module introduces students to some of the key current issues in housing policy, concentrating on the three key areas of quantity, quality and affordability. It examines the factors affecting the supply of, and demand for, housing, and explores the characteristics of the different tenures people may experience during their housing careers, looking at contemporary issues in each housing tenure. The module will also examine housing standards, and the policies for maintaining housing quality, together issues of housing finance. It will explore the managerial context of social rented housing which has undergone considerable change both governmentally [through devolution] and administratively [through a changing mix of local authorities, housing associations and other social rented housing agencies].