Modiwlau cwrs W890 | BA/CPW
BA Creative&Professional Writing

Modiwlau Blwyddyn 1

Modiwlau Gorfodol

Semester 1

  • QXP-1001: Creative Writing: Prose (20)
    This module, compulsory for creative writing students, introduces you to a wide range of creative prose-writing, both fictional and documentary and you will examine creative techniques used in short stories, autobiography, memoir, travel-writing, critical essays/literary reviews and play-scripts. It will include practical sessions in which students will begin to produce their own work in these genres, and group discussion of students’ work in progress. We will discuss the ways in which these genres are distinct from one another and yet share certain features and may in fact be merged by deliberate techniques of hybridisation. We will ask such questions as how a writer of fiction handles the transformation of personal experience as compared to the writer of memoirs. Can imaginative, speculative biographies enhance rather than falsify our knowledge of their subjects? How do writers tackle the adaptation of their work from one medium to another? As well as examining, from the practitioner's point of view, texts by leading authors and critics, you will be encouraged to work independently on your own material, helped by writing-exercises and longer-term assignments designed to stimulate ideas and sharpen technique. You will be encouraged to present your work for class discussion and, by receiving and giving feedback in a supportive atmosphere, you will develop your skills as a close reader and an articulate critic.
  • QXP-1003: Creative Writing: Poetry (20)
    This module, compulsory for creative writing students, introduces you to the range of forms available to the poet in the twenty-first century. You will read a variety of poetry and respond through producing your own poems. You will be asked to work in a variety of forms and to justify your reasons for choosing them. The module will demonstrate the ways in which poetry is an art form particularly well suited to expressing the experience of contemporary everyday life. We will also look at connections between poetry and music and the visual arts as well as the impact of digital technologies. Poetry will be presented both in the written and spoken form, and students will be encouraged to consider the performance of poetry both in class and by attending and reviewing recommended evening poetry readings by leading poets. .
  • QXE-1013: Reading, Thinking, Writing (20)
    The course will include analytical reading of drama, prose, poetry and film in English from the medieval period to the present era; an introduction to critical and theoretical approaches to the reading of literature; integration of close textual study and critical/theoretical approaches, as the foundation for all other modules in the School; practical development of skills of literary commentary, essay writing, and critical discussion.

Semester 2

  • QXP-1001: Creative Writing: Prose
    This module, compulsory for creative writing students, introduces you to a wide range of creative prose-writing, both fictional and documentary and you will examine creative techniques used in short stories, autobiography, memoir, travel-writing, critical essays/literary reviews and play-scripts. It will include practical sessions in which students will begin to produce their own work in these genres, and group discussion of students’ work in progress. We will discuss the ways in which these genres are distinct from one another and yet share certain features and may in fact be merged by deliberate techniques of hybridisation. We will ask such questions as how a writer of fiction handles the transformation of personal experience as compared to the writer of memoirs. Can imaginative, speculative biographies enhance rather than falsify our knowledge of their subjects? How do writers tackle the adaptation of their work from one medium to another? As well as examining, from the practitioner's point of view, texts by leading authors and critics, you will be encouraged to work independently on your own material, helped by writing-exercises and longer-term assignments designed to stimulate ideas and sharpen technique. You will be encouraged to present your work for class discussion and, by receiving and giving feedback in a supportive atmosphere, you will develop your skills as a close reader and an articulate critic.
  • QXP-1003: Creative Writing: Poetry
    This module, compulsory for creative writing students, introduces you to the range of forms available to the poet in the twenty-first century. You will read a variety of poetry and respond through producing your own poems. You will be asked to work in a variety of forms and to justify your reasons for choosing them. The module will demonstrate the ways in which poetry is an art form particularly well suited to expressing the experience of contemporary everyday life. We will also look at connections between poetry and music and the visual arts as well as the impact of digital technologies. Poetry will be presented both in the written and spoken form, and students will be encouraged to consider the performance of poetry both in class and by attending and reviewing recommended evening poetry readings by leading poets. .
  • UXS-1024: Introduction to Screenwriting (20)
    This module is an introduction to the basic underlying principles of screenwriting. It introduces students to key features of writing for film, and assesses them on their analyses of the screenplay form, plus the writing of a screenplay and treatment, and the pitching of an original concept. Students will primarily focus on writing for the short film format in order to facilitate their assessed short film screenplay assignment. Lectures will deliver various aspects of screenwriting, broken down week-by-week so that students can digest specific aspects of the craft of screenwriting. These include script formatting, style, structure, genre, plotting, characterisation and dialogue. Students will also learn how to present their work in the form of industry treatments and outlines, as well as techniques for outlining a concept orally, in the form of a film pitch. Students will be encouraged to develop professional writing habits and to give and receive critically constructive comment and advice. Seminar time will be spent discussing aspects of screenwriting, screened short films, as well as providing an opportunity for students to carry out creative screenwriting tasks in groups. Students will also be encouraged to critically peer evaluate the work of their cohort, and to analyse published screenplays, applying knowledge gained in the lecture. Students will also be required to read portions of screenplay extracts from published work prior to the seminars and lectures (uploaded to Blackboard) in order to analyse them during the seminars.

Modiwlau Opsiynol

40 credyd allan o:

  • UXS-1001: Intro to Practical Journalism (20) (Semester 1)
    The Basics of Writing a News Story; How to write Intros, Drop Intros, Lively Intros; What makes a good news story?; Where do stories come from?; How to build a contacts book; How to conduct an interview; Writing for TV and Radio; Colour and Feature Writing; An Introduction to Shorthand; How to deal with breaking news.
    neu
    UXC-1001: Cyfl. i Newyddiaduraeth Ymarf. (20) (Semester 1)
    Hanfodion ysgrifennu straeon newyddion; Sut i ysgrifennu Intros, Drop Intros, ac Intros Bywiog; Beth sy’n gwneud stori dda?; O le mae straeon yn dod?; Sut i greu llyfr contacts; Sut i gynnal cyfweliad; Ysgrifennu ar gyfer teledu a radio; Ysgrifennu erthyglau nodwedd; Cyflwyniad i llawfer; Ymdopi â newyddion sy’n torri.
  • QXE-1004: The Literature of Laughter (20) (Semester 2)
    The module is organised on a chronological basis, moving from Chaucer to Monty Python and beyond, taking in on the way a selection of texts by Shakespeare, Wycherley, Pope, Swift, Austen, Dickens, Twain, as well as Kate Atkinson’s Behind the Scenes at the Museum and an anthology of comic verse. The lectures place the texts in their historical and cultural contexts, while the seminars and study groups focus on the week’s specified text for close reading and discussion. Both the lectures and the smaller groups are consistently concerned with the module’s over-riding questions about the nature of literary laughter. Concepts such as wit and satire are analysed, along with some of the recurring topics of humorous writing: religion, politics, sex and gender. The major functions of laughter – for stereotyping, for self-defence, for reform, rebellion, or release of tension – are highlighted for both their continuity and their difference in specific literary and cultural contexts.
  • QXE-1014: The Gothic in Literature/Film (20) (Semester 2)
    This introductory course focuses mainly on Gothic writing from the late eighteenth century onwards, although it begins by looking at examples of the medieval and early-modern grotesque that help to set early Gothic novels in context. Organized in a loosely chronological way, this module is particularly sensitive to the ways in which Gothic texts have been used to represent contemporary cultural anxieties (such as the New Woman in the last quarter of the nineteenth century, or New Technology in the early years of the twenty-first), but it will also examine how the Gothic has been used to articulate political resistance, for example in anti-imperialist, post-colonial, and feminist works. It will also pay particular attention to the Gothic as a visual form, both analysing the representation of Gothic spaces in eighteenth and nineteenth-century literature and art, and investigating the importance of the genre to the development of cinema, from silent-era German expressionism to the present. While the precise topics covered by the module will vary from year to year, themes will include some of the following: Terror and the Sublime; Monstrosity and Deviance; Doubles and Doppelgängers; Vampires and Sexualities; Parody and Pastiche; Domesticity and ‘The Uncanny’; Cybergothic and the Post-human; Feminist and Postcolonial Rewritings; Gothic and the Young Adult Novel. Students will situate texts within their historical and political contexts, and will also gain an awareness of a range of important theories (from Freud’s notion of the Uncanny to Derrida’s theories of hauntology) that will be important to the study of literature in the rest of their degree.
  • QXE-1015: Landmarks in Literature (20) (Semester 1)
    The specific texts studied will vary from year to year, but the module will include nineteenth-century works (e.g. Edgar Allan Poe, Arthur Conan Doyle); English ‘classical’ stories of the early twentieth century (e.g. Agatha Christie); American ‘hard boiled’ versions (e.g. Dashiell Hammett, Raymond Chandler), and modernist, postmodernist and other variants (e.g. Jorge Luis Borges, Sara Paretsky, Walter Mosley, Paul Auster). Film and television adaptations may also be included. The module will also situate the texts in relevant historical and cultural contexts, and explore them via key concepts in literary theory.
  • QXP-1016: Children's Fiction (Creative) (20) (Semester 2)
  • UXS-1017: Writing Across Media (20) (Semester 1)
    In "Creating Narratives" you will have the opportunity to investigate, and participate in, a variety of creative activites relating to the production of fiction. You will be able to develop an awareness of issues connected with the writing and consumption of fiction (e.g.creative, cultural and technological issues), and discover how cultural norms and assumptions, and individually writerly actions, influence fiction writing choice and fiction readerships. You will look at contemporary fiction writing around the world in a variety of media, and consider the role of publishers and readers in the creative process.
  • UXS-1800: Game Studies (20) (Semester 1)
  • UXS-1801: Game Design 1 (20) (Semester 2)

Modiwlau Blwyddyn 2

Modiwlau Opsiynol

40 - 80 credyd allan o:

  • QXP-2001: C/Writing: Poetry & Short Fict (20) (Semester 2)
    This double-thin module is designed to help solve the problem that inexperienced writers have of writing in ways that are too abstract and general. You will be set exercises that sharpen dialogue and assist with the depiction of place in fiction, and exercises that demonstrate how images are most effectively evoked in poems. These ‘showing’ devices will then be placed in context by the use of models that indicate the importance of ‘telling’, that indicate how scenic devices in fiction are framed by direct authorial intervention, and how images in poems are linked to statements that further define and complicate them. Students are required to attend and review three evening poetry-readings to be given by leading poets during the course.
  • QXP-2004: Creative Writing: The Novel (20) (Semester 1)
    Creative Writing: The Novel will guide you through the ways and means of writing a novel. You will be taught methods of composition and creation of novels, including practical and analytical consideration of novelistic structure and design, viewpoint, voice and role-play, and developing style and tone. It also includes, with reference to the practical application and consideration of these elements, consideration of the variety of forms relevant to the contemporary novel, comparing and contrasting novels, present and past, with other forms of creative writing.
  • QXP-2005: Transformative Writing (20) (Semester 1)
    Some of today's well known works of literature were produced by writers 'writing back' to and transforming certain source materials. Examples include Peter Carey's prize-winning tnrsformation of Dickens' 'Great Expectations' in 'Jack Maggs' (1997), and Gregory Maguire's transformation of Baum's 'Wizard of Oz' in 'Wicked: The Life and times of the Wicked Witch of the West' (1995). This module examines the ideas and chanllenges of transformative writing, how such writing differs from adaptation, and how professional writers have employed it in their works. Students will be introduced to the practice of responding through creative writing, and given the chance to select their own source material (of whatever kind) in order to experiment and 'write back' to it. Students will also have the opportunity to experience and reflect upon the nature of a negotiated writing project through the use of an initial writing contract (in weeks one and two)
  • QXP-2019: Contemporary Writing (CW) (20) (Semester 2)
  • QXE-2024: Alfred Hitchcock (20) (Semester 2)
    Alfred Hitchcock is perhaps the most notable example of a director whose films were popular both with audiences and with critics seeking to establish the credibility of film as an art form. His work provides a case-study of theories of authorship; of different national cinemas and studio systems, and of a particular genre, the thriller. In addition, the popularity and accessibility of Hitchcock’s films also raise questions concerning narrative, spectatorial pleasure, the gaze, and gender, and consequently provide an opportunity to explore the interrelation and limits of film theory and film practice
  • QXE-2027: Literature and Modernity (20) (Semester 1)
    Literature and Modernity examines literature about, or by writers from, Britain and Ireland in a period bracketed by the emergence of proto-modernist writing in the late 1890s and the emergence in the early 1950s of texts that would later be seen as postmodern. This period in Western Europe witnessed unprecedented changes in the modes of production, in relations between the sexes and between the classes, and in the development of new cultural forms like radio and cinema. While these originated in the Victorian period, they were accelerated by the social and psychological impact of the First World War, global depression, the rise of fascism, another catastrophic World War and the start of the nuclear age, historical factors that make the study of literature from this period especially rewarding. Students will study some of the ways in which authors responded to these cataclysmic shifts by considering work from a range of critical perspectives. These may include the literary movement (for example, modernism), broad historical change (for example, changes in gender roles), a major historical event (for example, the Second World War), genre, or recent trends in criticism which encourage us to look at this period’s writing from a new angle.

40 - 80 credyd allan o:

  • UXS-2038: Journalism and Risk (20) (Semester 1)
    This course starts by presenting and critiquing the concept of risk, and the development of the field of risk communication. It then examines two key theorists of the 'risk society', namely Ulrich Beck and Anthony Giddens, to explore sociological theoretical foundations that explain inter-relationships of risk, trust, expertise and mass-mediated communication. Building on this theoretical lens, it then moves to examine journalism, risk and trust, looking at patterns of risk reporting in different aspects of the press. In-depth analysis of specific risk issues and their journalistic communication are examined, ranging from health risks like 'mad cow' disease to security risks like terrorism.
  • UXS-2048: Transmedia Storytelling (20) (Semester 2)
    In this module you will investigate storytelling in its various forms, writing through an awareness of critical theory, and creating original work relating to your investigations. You'll develop an awareness of issues (critical and creative) connected with storytelling, and consider the range, type and style of stories (genres, media, perspectives). You will discover how cultural norms and assumptions influence the telling of stories, exploring and applying relevant critical theory from the perspective of a writer, and reveal through your original work the nature of authorship and readership.
  • UXS-2055: Privacy and the Media (20) (Semester 1)
    Week 1 – Introduction: why privacy matters Week 2 – Philosophical/theoretical contexts Week 3 – Journalism Week 3 – Telecommunications, transparency and the Snowden leaks Week 4 – Behavioural advertising Week 5 – Big data and sentiment analysis Week 6 – The direction of Google, search and personal assistants Week 7 – Social media Week 8 – Gaming and biometric media Week 9 – Wearable media Week 10 – Telekinetic media and Google Glass Week 11 – Wrap-up: what do media developments tell us about privacy?
  • UXS-2058: Writing for Film & Television (20) (Semester 2)
    This module is designed to develop knowledge and skills in writing for film, and introduces key stylistic and textual characteristics of writing for television. The module provides an overview of television writing, separated into television drama and the situation comedy, and outlines the specific demands of these formats for screenwriters. Students are then assessed on their own original television concept in the form of a treatment and screenplay extract, plus a short critical and reflective essay. The course then goes on to present advanced theories of writing for film - developing concepts of characterisation, structure, genre, visual storytelling and the use of dialogue and action. Students will be encouraged to engage with formal screenwriting concepts such as the three-act structure, genre tropes, active protagonists and plot resolutions. However, they will also be expected to interrogate and challenge these elements of screenwriting craft, and are expected to display this engagement in their assessed work. Students will be assessed on their own original film concept in the form of a treatment and screenplay extract (for a short film or feature film), plus a critical and reflective essay. Lectures will deliver various features of writing for television and film, using screenings as contextual support material. Lectures will initially present some basic concepts of screenwriting such as script formatting, style, structure, genre, plotting, characterisation and dialogue, before moving on to deal specifically with television drama, situation comedy, the short film and the feature film. Seminar time will be spent discussing various aspects of screenwriting outlined in the lectures. Students will be encouraged to engage with, and challenge, elements of the craft of screenwriting, and to carry out creative screenwriting tasks in groups. Students will also critically peer evaluate the work of their cohort, and analyse published screenplays, applying knowledge gained in the lectures. Students will be required to develop professional writing habits and to give and receive critically constructive comment and advice. Proposed films and television programmes to be screened include: The Sopranos (Chase, 1999-2007), The Wire (Simon, 2002-08), Red Riding (Jarrold, 2009), The Singing Detective (Potter, 1986), The Prisoner (McGoohan, 1967-68), Oz (Fontana, 1997-2003), Twin Peaks (Frost/Lynch, 1990-91), The IT Crowd (Linehan, 2006- ), Spaced (Wright, 1999-2001), The Office (Gervais/Merchant, 2001-3), Father Ted (Linehan, 1995-8). The Third Man (Reed, 1949), Brief Encounter (Lean, 1945), The Devil¿s Backbone (Del Toro, 2001), Intacto (Fresnadillo, 2001), Hunger (McQueen, 2008), Dead Man's Shoes (Meadows, 2004), The Sea Inside (Amenábar, 2004), The White Ribbon (Haneke, 2009), Festen (Vinterberg, 1998), Uzak (Ceylan, 2002), Sympathy for Mr Vengeance (Park, 2002), Let the Right One In (Alfredson, 2008), The Road (Hillcoat, 2009), Sexy Beast (Glazer, 2000), No Country for Old Men (Coen, 2007)
  • UXS-2076: Global News Agenda (20) (Semester 2)
    Topics that this module will discuss include: the CNN effect; manipulating global news agendas through public diplomacy; war, perception management and bearing witness through global media forms; reporting distant suffering; satellite news wars; the rise of satellite news in the Middle East and the possible rise of an Arab public sphere; and the impact of global news forms on censorship and resistance.
  • UXS-2126: Animation & motion graphics (20) (Semester 1)
    Keyframe animation, drawn animation, rotoscoping, stop-motion animation, infographic design, principles of design, elements of design, storyboarding and animation design, reflective practice, history of animation, major animation styles, current independent animations.
  • UXS-2401: Practical Journalism: ELD (20) (Semester 1)
    The course will teach students media law and how to report on the workings of government. They will gain practical experience in reporting from courts, inquests and council meetings. They will also be taught how to write and research news and feature articles, interviewing techniques, and how to cover running stories and elections.
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    UXC-2401: Newyddiaduraeth Ymarferol: MCD (20) (Semester 1)
    Bydd y modiwl yn dysgu myfyrwyr am gyfraith y cyfryngau a sut i ohebu am brosesau'r llywodraeth. Byddant yn cael profiad ymarferol o ohebu am achosion llys, cwestau a chyfarfodydd cyngor. Byddant hefyd yn dysgu sut i ymchwilio ac ysgrifennu erthyglau newyddion ac erthyglau nodwedd, technegau cyfweld a sut i ymdrin â straeon parhaol ac etholiadau.
  • UXS-2800: Game Design Level & Mechanics (20) (Semester 1)
  • UXS-2801: Game Development (20) (Semester 2)

Modiwlau Blwyddyn 3

Modiwlau Gorfodol

40 credyd allan o:

  • QXP-3099: Creative Writing Dissertation (40) (Semester 1 + 2)
    This module involves the production of an extended piece of creative writing of high quality, with an attached ‘criticism in practice’ piece, an introduction to the work, and relevant bibliographic and ‘creative’ references. The focus of the dissertation is the piece of creative writing, which can be undertaken in any genre (after agreement with supervisor) and must be preceeded by a detailed (2 3 page) plan of work to be completed. The critical piece can be in a style similar to that of a critical literature essay, or it can be more focused on creative practice or the contextualisation of that creative practice, and can use the student’s own work as one of the reference points, as well as containing references to the work of other writers. The length of the dissertation varies according the genre and is the subject of discussion with the supervisor, but as a guide the total number of words for a prose fiction submission would be between 8,000 and 10,000 words. The deadline for submission of the dissertation is noon on Friday of week ten of semester two.
  • UXB-3900: Research Dissertation (40) (Semester 1 + 2)
  • UXB-3901: Creative Practice Dissertation (40) (Semester 1 + 2)
  • UXB-3902: Enterprise Dissertation (40) (Semester 1 + 2)

Modiwlau Opsiynol

40 - 80 credyd allan o:

  • QXP-3011: Discovering Cities (20) (Semester 1)
  • QXE-3012: Detective Fiction (20) (Semester 1)
    This module covers nineteenth-century works by Poe, Collins and Conan Doyle; English ‘classical’ stories of the early twentieth century (Chesterton, Christie); American ‘hard boiled’ versions (Hammett, Chandler), and modernist and postmodernist variants (Borges, Auster). The module will situate the text in some historical and cultural contexts, and focus on the relationship between form and ideology in the genre.
  • QXE-3022: Shakespeare and EM Literature (20) (Semester 1)
  • QXP-3025: Fantastic Fictions (20) (Semester 2)
  • QXE-3028: Literature in the Community (20) (Semester 1)
  • QXE-3031: Welsh Writing in English (20) (Semester 2)
    ‘Modern Welsh Writing in English’ will consider a range of texts, principally written in English, emerging from modern Wales. The module explores the development of a tradition of Anglophone Welsh writing from the late nineteenth century, across the twentieth century and up to the contemporary moment. In so doing seeks to investigate the varied ways in which Welsh writers – male and female, from North and South (and beyond), rural and industrial, and across a range of genres and forms – have articulated the Welsh experience in all its diversity. The module will also introduce students to some of the current critical and theoretical approaches being adopted in the study of Welsh writing.
  • QXE-3034: Arthur: legend and super hero (20) (Semester 1)
    This module will consider a selection of the best writing about the Arthurian legend, from the ninth century to the twentieth, with the aim of showing the development and use of this legend throughout a very long period. The choice of texts may be vary from year to year, but is likely to include the Mabinogion, Geoffrey of Monmouth, Malory, Shakespeare, Tennyson, Mark Twain and T.H. White. The main themes that inform the legend will be discussed alongside the different writers’ agendas in adapting and manipulating the core elements of the tradition.
  • QXE-3088: Bob Dylan (20) (Semester 2)
    SEMINARS Material to be studied in seminars will include: Critical distinctions between modernist, mass, and popular cultures; `Folk music¿ and Dylan's early career; Rock music and Dylan's transition to electric performance; The relationship between biography and critical analysis; Dylan and religion; Dylan and literature; Textual analysis of the song lyric; Dylan and the visual arts; The transition from analogue to digital reproduction and dissemination; Bootleg culture.
  • QXP-3093: Experimental Writing (20) (Semester 1)
  • QXE-3094: Realms of Magic (20) (Semester 2)
    This module will cover the development of the romance genre from its earliest form in Marie de France’s and Chrétien de Troyes’ work through to insular productions such as Amis and Amiloun, Emaré, King of Tars, Isumbras, Sir Amadace, Bevis of Hampton, and Floris and Blancheflour. The range of texts will remain flexible, and their early modern versions will also form part of the discussion; the transformations and adaptations of these romances in medieval manuscripts and early modern prints will also be addressed. Topics as varied as spiritual instruction, courtly love, political governance, war, sexual fulfilment and magic will be investigated alongside incest, race, gender and ideology. The versatility of the genre will be explored in its development into other genres, in particular, but not exclusively, in early modern drama, and the endurance of its appeal will be judged with reference to the transformation of the genre in the early modern period. Connections will be established with Shakespeare’s plays and Spenser’s Faerie Queene. The module will end with analyses of adaptations of romance in the modern period (novel, film productions).
  • QXE-3096: Medieval Women's Literature (20) (Semester 1)
    What texts were medieval women writing and reading? This module examines women’s textual culture in an historical period in which many male-authored works encouraged women to be ‘chaste, silent and obedient,’ in spite of an assumption that women were naturally inclined towards lust and gossip. The module explores texts from the range of literature written and read by women, and the ways in which female-produced works (those written, translated, read, commissioned, performed and discussed in medieval England) were in dialogue with the constructions of medieval womanhood current during this period. The texts studied in seminar offer opportunity to hear, amongst others, the intimate thoughts and words of Margery Kempe, Julian of Norwich, the Paston wives and Marie de France, on topics as broad as love, marriage, sex, death and religion, as recorded in travel narratives, letters, devotions, lyrics and other literature – all of which contributed to the rich textual culture of the Middle Ages. This module is an ideal companion to any of the other level three medieval literature modules.
  • QXE-3102: The 1820s: Print Explosion (20) (Semester 2)
    The early nineteenth century was a period of radical social and intellectual change that also witnessed an explosion in new forms of print culture, from the ‘serious’ historical novels of Walter Scott through to the supposedly light reading of the Christmas gift book, or annual. This module concentrates on a single decade – the 1820s – in order to explore the emergence of several of these new forms, including, for example, the illustrated political satire of William Hone and the other post-Peterloo radicals, the playful critical essays of Hazlitt and Lamb (associated with an emergent magazine culture), and the new forms of writing about the self in the ‘confessions’ of De Quincey and Hogg. This module investigates a range of canonical texts (which may include Byron’s mock-epic Don Juan; an example of Scott’s ‘Waverley’ novels; and the Confessions of an English Opium-Eater), while placing them in the context of less familiar works (such as Pierce Egan’s illustrated novel, Life in London, the short stories of The Keepsake, and John Clare’s manuscript poems). This combination of canonical and understudied popular texts raises important questions about the relationship between image and text, literature and politics, the individual and society, questions still prevalent in our own age.
  • QXE-3105: Reading Myth (20) (Semester 2)
    This module will take as its focus the textual response to inherited mythic structures: how myth may be perceived in theoretical terms as a proairetic discourse; how it establishes affinities with certain genres (e.g. epic, tragedy, romance); and how in more contemporary cultural debates it has been problematised by expectations of falsehood. The seminar programme will range from Ancient Greek representations of myth (e.g. Medea) to medieval accounts of Scripture in dramatic narrative (e.g. Abraham and Isaac) and to varying accounts of saints’ lives. In the early modern period attention may be devoted to the changing importance of ancient mythologies in literary narrative. In the more contemporary periods, options will change from year to year, but may include explorations of such pervasive constructs as the Founding of Empire (Kipling, Lessing), The American Dream (Capote, Fitzgerald, Highsmith) and The War on Terror (Buchan, Fleming, and Porter’s Empire State).
  • QXE-3107: EM Lit: Sex, Sects and Scandal (20) (Semester 1)
    Beginning with English constructions of nationhood in the 1590s, this module will examine the pressures that are placed upon Tudor notions of English identity by the ways in which early modern texts engage with Britishness. From here, the module will move to explore seventeenth century Anglophone literature in Wales, Ireland and Scotland. Authors to be studied might include Edmund Spenser, Thomas Nashe, Thomas Deloney, Thomas Heywood, William Shakespeare, Katherine Philips, Henry Vaughn, William Drummond and Roger Boyle.
  • QXE-3110: Neo-Victorian Fiction (20) (Semester 2)
  • QXE-3113: The Monstrous Middle Ages (20) (Semester 2)

40 - 80 credyd allan o:

  • UXS-3038: Journalism and Risk (20) (Semester 1)
    This course starts by presenting and critiquing the concept of risk, and the development of the field of risk communication. It then examines two key theorists of the 'risk society', namely Ulrich Beck and Anthony Giddens, to explore sociological theoretical foundations that explain inter-relationships of risk, trust, expertise and mass-mediated communication. Building on this theoretical lens, it then moves to examine journalism, risk and trust, looking at patterns of risk reporting in different aspects of the press. In-depth analysis of specific risk issues and their journalistic communication are examined, ranging from health risks like 'mad cow' disease to security risks like terrorism.
  • UXS-3049: Advanced Screenwriting (20) (Semester 1)
    Lectures will deliver various discourses on the history and development of adaptations, and interrogate the relationship of various media to film. Lectures will also examine a range of concepts related to adaptation, including authorship, visual storytelling, narratology and intertextuality. These concepts will then be applied to film adaptations screened in the same week. Seminar time will be spent discussing theories of adaptation, and also provide an opportunity for students to carry out creative adaptation tasks in groups, such as conceiving short film ideas, and developing adaptations from non-literary sources, such as music and photography, and other visual arts. Students will need to demonstrate an understanding of key theories related to the comparative textual analysis of an adaptation to its source material in assessed essays. However, the module is heavily focused on the creative act and process of adaptation, and offers the chance for students to radically imagine pre-existing texts in other media in their assessed coursework. Proposed films to be screened include: Adaptation (Jonze, 2002), Throne of Blood (Kurosawa, 1957), American Psycho (Harron, 2000), The Innocents (Clayton, 1961), The Others (Amenábar, 2001), The Watchmen (Snyder, 2009), Don't Look Now (Roeg, 1973), The Shining (Kubrick, 1980), Apocalypse Now (Coppola, 1979), Stalker (Tarkovsky, 1979), Zatoichi (Kitano, 2003), Where the Wild Things Are (Jonze, 2009), La Jetée (Marker, 1962), 12 Monkeys (Gilliam, 1995), Naked Lunch (Cronenberg, 1991), A Cock & Bull Story (Winterbottom, 2005), Elephant (Clarke, 1989), Elephant (Van Sant, 2003), The Five Obstructions (Leth/Von Trier, 2003).
  • UXS-3055: Privacy and the Media (20) (Semester 1)
    Week 1 – Introduction: why privacy matters Week 2 – Philosophical/theoretical contexts Week 3 – Journalism Week 3 – Telecommunications, transparency and the Snowden leaks Week 4 – Behavioural advertising Week 5 – Big data and sentiment analysis Week 6 – The direction of Google, search and personal assistants Week 7 – Social media Week 8 – Gaming and biometric media Week 9 – Wearable media Week 10 – Telekinetic media and Google Glass Week 11 – Wrap-up: what do media developments tell us about privacy?
  • UXS-3076: Global News Agenda (20) (Semester 2)
    Topics that this module will discuss include: the CNN effect; manipulating global news agendas through public diplomacy; war, perception management and bearing witness through global media forms; reporting distant suffering; satellite news wars; the rise of satellite news in the Middle East and the possible rise of an Arab public sphere; and the impact of global news forms on censorship and resistance.
  • UXS-3401: Practical Journalism: ELD (20) (Semester 1)
    The course will teach students media law and how to report on the workings of government. They will gain practical experience in reporting from courts, inquests and council meetings. They will also be taught how to write and research news and feature articles, interviewing techniques, and how to cover running stories and elections.
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    UXC-3401: Newyddiaduraeth Ymarferol: MCD (20) (Semester 1)
    Bydd y modiwl yn dysgu myfyrwyr am gyfraith y cyfryngau a sut i ohebu am brosesau'r llywodraeth. Byddant yn cael profiad ymarferol o ohebu am achosion llys, cwestau a chyfarfodydd cyngor. Byddant hefyd yn dysgu sut i ymchwilio ac ysgrifennu erthyglau newyddion ac erthyglau nodwedd, technegau cyfweld a sut i ymdrin â straeon parhaol ac etholiadau.
  • UXS-3412: Playable Fiction (20) (Semester 2)
    The creative writer is constantly challenged by the evolution of literary form, striving to create fresh and original narratives that depart from the conventional. Modernism, postmodernism, and now digital media are all avenues of exploration and experimentation. This module focuses on the latter domain, as writers approach narrative through the creation of games. Story-games, such as hypertexts, interactive fictions, and visual novels, necessitate unconventional, and even unnatural, structures and perspectives. By creating playable narratives, students on this course will open their writing up to new expressions, forms, and genres. Students will discuss and explore critical and creative responses to these texts, applying new techniques and awareness to their creative writing practice.
  • UXS-3800: Game Design 3 (20) (Semester 1)
  • UXS-3801: Game Production (20) (Semester 2)