Modiwl SXY-1005:
Introduction to Criminology

Ffeithiau’r Modiwl

Rhedir gan School of History, Philosophy and Social Sciences

20 Credyd neu 10 Credyd ECTS

Semester 2

Trefnydd: Miss Emma Thomas

Amcanion cyffredinol

Criminology is one of the most fascinating areas of study. Crime forms a major issue for societies and people discuss crime frequently. It also has become a hot political topic in many countries, being related to worries about the condition of society. "Introduction to Criminology" familiarizes first year students with major ways of thinking about crime. The module introduces some of the main theoretical perspectives within criminology. Theories have been developed since the 18th century in an attempt to explain why people commit crime or resist crime, and the history of thought on this question will be examined. The module considers the shifting definitions of crime and offenders. Empirical concerns are likely to include the role of the media in crime construction, everyday-crime, subcultures and crime, modern slavery, safeguarding children and domestic violence, the experiences of citizens of crime and their attitudes to crime. Examples will be chosen from history and present time, from the UK, the United States and other countries. The module covers the crimes of the powerful as well as the crimes committed by the ordinary (wo)man on the steet. Relations of crime to the economic and political system, as well as to 'private' areas of e.g. the family, will be explored.

Cynnwys cwrs

Weekly lectures will cover the topics: Definitions of crime and criminology. For what do we use criminological theory? Situational action theory of crime. Early sociological theories of crime I and II: Durkheim and Marx Italian positivist theory of crime Sociological theories of crime III: American approaches from Merton to the labeling theory Experiences with crime: the public and victims Theories of crime in the media and of audience responses Feminist theories of crime Neo-Durkheimian theory: social identity and justice

The lecture is accompanied by workshop groups. Students will be assigned to one of the groups where they will have the opportunity to engage in a discussion on selected topics. Workshops also offer exercises to prepare for the assignments.

Meini Prawf

C- i C+

Show a satisfying understanding of some of the main criminological explanations of why crime is committed, and explain and evaluate a sufficient number of the main similarities and differences between these theories; demonstrate a good understanding of the ways in which crime is defined within society; show an appreciation of the impact of crime on some members of society; examine media reports of crime and comment on the ways in which images of crime are constructed; present spoken and written material in a structured and mainly convincing manner, focusing on some of the major relevant issues; locate a good range of sources of information and produce written work that is predominantly referenced and presented in a basically sound manner.

trothwy

Present spoken and written material clearly, focusing on major points relevant to the question or argument; locate basic sources of information and produce appropriately formatted and referenced work. Show an understanding of some of the main criminological explanations of why crime is committed, and explain some of the main similarities and differences between these theories; demonstrate a basic understanding of the ways in which crime is defined within society; show an awareness of the impact of crime on some members of society; examine media reports of crime; present spoken and written material in a clear manner, focusing on some of the major relevant issues; locate basic sources of information and produce appropriately formatted and referenced work.

ardderchog

Provide a comprehensive account of some of the main criminological explanations of why crime is committed, and analysed some of the main similarities and differences between these theories; demonstrate a competent understanding of the ways in which crime is defined within society; show a clear appreciation of the impact of crime on society in general and groups such as victims in particular; examine media reports on crime and critically comment on the ways in which images of crime are constructed; make oral and written presentations of relatively complex material in a clear and competent manner, identifying and focusing on some of the major relevant issues; work independently to locate a wide range of sources of information, and produce properly referenced written work that is of a good standard.

da

Show a good understanding of some of the main criminological explanations of why crime is committed, and explain and evaluate some of the main similarities and differences between these theories; demonstrate a thorough understanding of the ways in which crime is defined within society; show a clear appreciation of the impact of crime on some members of society; examine media reports of crime and comment on the ways in which images of crime are constructed; present spoken and written material in a clear and competent manner, focusing on some of the major relevant issues; locate a wide range of sources of information and produce written work that is properly referenced and presented.

Canlyniad dysgu

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the foundations of criminological thought
    2. Show an understanding of the ways in which crime has been defined and constructed in legal, social, political and historical contexts in several countries.
    3. Examine the impact of crime on society, including victims of crime.
    4. Identify key concepts relating to the criminal behaviour and societal responses to it.
    5. Demonstrate the ability to locate, interpret, and critically evaluate (at the beginner level) relevant literature and evidence relating to criminal and deviant behaviour.

Dulliau asesu

Math Enw Disgrifiad Pwysau
GWAITH CWRS Book review 40
TRAETHAWD Essay 60

Strategaeth addysgu a dysgu

Oriau
Workshop

Workshop - 12 hours over 12 weeks

12
Private study

Private study - 176 hours

176
Lecture

Lectures - 12 hours over 12 weeks

12

Sgiliau Trosglwyddadwy

  • Llythrennedd - Medrusrwydd mewn darllen ac ysgrifennu drwy amrywiaeth o gyfryngau
  • Rhifedd - Medrusrwydd wrth ddefnyddio rhifau ar lefelau priodol o gywirdeb
  • Hunanreolaeth - Gallu gweithio mewn ffordd effeithlon, prydlon a threfnus. Gallu edrych ar ganlyniadau tasgau a digwyddiadau, a barnu lefelau o ansawdd a phwysigrwydd
  • Archwilio - Gallu ymchwilio ac ystyried dewisiadau eraill
  • Adalw gwybodaeth - Gallu mynd at wahanol ac amrywiol ffynonellau gwybodaeth
  • Sgiliau Rhyngbersonol - Gallu gofyn cwestiynau, gwrando'n astud ar atebion a'u harchwilio
  • Dadansoddi Beirniadol & Datrys Problem - Gallu dadelfennu a dadansoddi problemau neu sefyllfaoedd cymhleth. Gallu canfod atebion i broblemau drwy ddadansoddiadau ac archwilio posibiliadau
  • Cyflwyniad - Gallu cyflwyno gwybodaeth ac esboniadau yn glir i gynulleidfa. Trwy gyfryngau ysgrifenedig neu ar lafar yn glir a hyderus.
  • Dadl - Gallu cyflwyno, trafod a chyfiawnhau barn neu lwybr gweithredu, naill ai gydag unigolyn neu mewn grwˆp ehangach

Sgiliau pwnc penodol

  • control, policing, criminal and youth justice, sentencing, and alternative responses to offending
  • how to use empirical evidence - both quantitative and qualitative in criminology and sociology
  • relationships between these and social divisions and social change.
  • the ability to formulate and investigate sociologically informed questions
  • awareness of how political and cultural values - including the student's own - have an impact on responses to and rival interpretations of safety and security, crime
  • competence in using major theoretical perspectives and concepts in sociology, and their application to social life
  • the capacity to analyse, assess and communicate empirical sociological information
  • the ability to identify a range of qualitative and quantitative research strategies and methods
  • the ability to conduct sociological / criminolgical research
  • the ability to undertake and present scholarly work
  • the ability to recognise the relevance of sociological knowledge to social, public and civic policy.
  • Understand the relationship between theory, research design, and the selection of research methods and be able to identify and critically evaluate the positions upon which they are predicated.
  • Appreciate and apply a broad range of research methods and tools (underpinned by a strong conceptual awareness of the research processes).
  • Appreciate philosophical, ethical and methodological issues in criminological and legal research.
  • Appreciate the inter-relationships between criminological and legal theories, criminological and legal research, and policies of key institutions.
  • how crime, deviance and victimisation are socially and legally constructed the different sources of information about crime and victimisation, both quantitative and qualitative, and how they are produced - including their location in particular legal, political, social and ideological frameworks - and how they can be interpreted
  • trends in crime, harm and victimisation
  • different forms of crime and their social organisation
  • different theoretical and empirical approaches to the study, analysis and explanation of crime, deviance, harm and victimisation
  • theoretical and empirical relationships between power, crime and social change, and the impact of globalisation
  • the development of criminology as a distinct area of study and inquiry, and its multidisciplinary or interdisciplinary nature
  • alternative theoretical approaches within criminology, and contemporary debates about the content and scope of criminology
  • relationships of crime, deviance and offending, and victimisation to social divisions such as: age, gender, sexuality, social class, race, ethnicity and religious faith
  • the development, role, organisation and governance of efforts to reduce and prevent crime, deviance and harm, and to ensure personal and public safety and security in different locations; the role of the state and non-governmental agencies
  • the effectiveness of such measures, and human rights issues in relation to preventive and pre-emptive measures
  • the social and historical development of the main institutions involved in crime control in different locations
  • the philosophy and politics of criminalisation, victimisation, criminal justice and modes of punishment
  • representations of victimisation, crime and deviance, and of the main agents and institutions which respond to crime and deviance, as found in the mass media, new media, in official reports and in public opinion
  • how to use empirical evidence - both quantitative and qualitative - about the distribution of crime, deviance, offending and victimisation of all kinds to explore relationships between these and social divisions and social change.
  • how to develop a reflective approach and a critical awareness of the values of local cultures and local politics, and of the student's own values, biography and social identity, and how to bring these skills to bear in an informed response to crime and victimisation
  • awareness of how political and cultural values - including the student's own - have an impact on responses to and rival interpretations of safety and security, crime
  • how to make ethically sound judgements in relation to research carried out by others or oneself
  • awareness of principles and values of law and justice, and of ethics
  • knowledge and understanding of theories, concepts, values in law within an institutional, social, national and global context
  • the ability to formulate and investigate sociologically informed questions
  • competence in using major theoretical perspectives and concepts in sociology, and their application to social life
  • the capacity to analyse, assess and communicate empirical sociological information
  • the ability to identify a range of qualitative and quantitative research strategies and methods
  • the ability to conduct sociological research
  • the ability to undertake and present scholarly work
  • the ability to recognise the relevance of sociological knowledge to social, public and civic policy.
  • Develop a sound appreciation of the variety of theories that comprise the discipline of social policy and how these impact on social policy interventions
  • Become cognizant with key conceptual debates within the field of contemporary social policy
  • Appreciate the value of and apply theoretical and methodological rigour to analyses of welfare issues;
  • Be aware of the ethical, social and political contexts within which social policy practice and research is conducted and delivered
  • seek out, use and evaluate qualitative and quantitative data derived from social surveys and other research publications
  • Develop a knowledge and expertise with respect to a range of evidence-based policy making and practice.
  • Develop a sophisticated understanding of the processes of social policy analysis and evaluation.
  • use some of the established theories and concepts of social policy and other social sciences to analyse how social needs, social problems and policies themselves are constructed and understood in both national and international contexts
  • undertake either on their own, or in collaboration with others, investigations on social questions, issues and problems. This will involve skills in problem identification; the collection, storage management and manipulation of data, including secondary data, and other information; the use of archival sources; the construction of coherent and reasoned arguments; and the presentation of clear conclusions and recommendations distinguish among and critically evaluate different theoretical, technical, normative, moral and political approaches to social problems and issues.
  • distinguish among and critically evaluate different theoretical, technical, normative, moral and political approaches to social problems and issues
  • how to develop a reflective approach and a critical awareness of the values of local cultures and local politics, and of the student's own values, biography and social identity, and how to bring these skills to bear in an informed response to crime and victimisation
  • awareness of how political and cultural values - including the student's own have an impact on responses to and rival interpretations of safety and security, crime
  • how to make ethically sound judgements in relation to research carried out by others or oneself
  • how to use empirical evidence - both quantitative and qualitative - about the distribution of crime, deviance, offending and victimisation of all kinds to explore
  • relationships between these and social divisions and social change.
  • Understand the relationship between theory, research design, and the selection of research methods and be able to identify and critically evaluate the epistemological positions upon which they are predicated.
  • Understand the basic principles of research design and strategy (including how to formulate researchable questions and the considerations affecting inference and proof, reliability and validity in different styles of research), sufficient to enable them to make appropriate choices in their own research.
  • Appreciate and apply a broad range of research methods and tools (underpinned by a strong conceptual awareness of the research processes and their underlying philosophies).
  • Appreciate philosophical, ethical and methodological issues in criminological and sociological research.
  • the development of criminology as a distinct area of study and inquiry, and its multidisciplinary or interdisciplinary nature
  • Sociolinguistics addresses the relationship between language and society.
  • the main forms of sentence and alternatives; the governance, roles and structure of the agencies involved; and offenders' experiences of adjudication and sentence
  • representations of victimisation, crime and deviance, and of the main agents and institutions which respond to crime and deviance, as found in the mass media, new media, in official reports and in public opinion
  • Appreciate the inter-relationships between sociological and socio-legal theories, criminological and sociological research, and policies of key institutions.
  • Understand the value of and apply comparative analysis within criminology and sociology.
  • alternative theoretical approaches within criminology, and contemporary debates about the content and scope of criminology
  • how crime, deviance and victimisation are socially and legally constructed the different sources of information about crime and victimisation, both quantitative and qualitative, and how they are produced - including their location in particular legal, political, social and ideological frameworks - and how they can be interpreted
  • trends in crime, harm and victimisation
  • different forms of crime and their social organisation
  • different theoretical and empirical approaches to the study, analysis and explanation of crime, deviance, harm and victimisation
  • theoretical and empirical relationships between power, crime and social change, and the impact of globalisation
  • the development, role, organisation and governance of efforts to reduce and prevent crime, deviance and harm, and to ensure personal and public safety and security in different locations; the role of the state and non-governmental agencies
  • the effectiveness of such measures, and human rights issues in relation to preventive and pre-emptive measures
  • the social and historical development of the main institutions involved in crime control in different locations
  • the philosophy and politics of criminalisation, victimisation, criminal justice and modes of punishment
  • representations of victimisation, crime and deviance, and of the main agents and institutions which respond to crime and deviance, as found in the mass media, new media, in official reports and in public opinion
  • how to develop a reflective approach and a critical awareness of the values of local cultures and local politics, and of the student's own values, biography and social identity, and how to bring these skills to bear in an informed response to crime and victimisation
  • relationships of crime, deviance and offending, and victimisation to social divisions such as: age, gender, sexuality, social class, race, ethnicity and religious faith
  • Understand the basic principles of research design and strategy (including how to formulate researchable questions and the considerations affecting inference and proof, reliability and validity in different styles of research), sufficient to enable them to make appropriate choices in their own research.
  • Appreciate and apply a broad range of research methods and tools (underpinned by a strong conceptual awareness of the research processes and their underlying philosophies).
  • Appreciate philosophical, ethical and methodological issues in criminological and criminal justice research.
  • Appreciate the inter-relationships between sociological and socio-legal theories, criminological and criminal justice research, and criminal justice policies.
  • Understand the value of and apply comparative analysis within criminology and criminal justice.
  • the development of criminology as a distinct area of study and inquiry, and its multidisciplinary or interdisciplinary nature
  • alternative theoretical approaches within criminology, and contemporary debates about the content and scope of criminology
  • theoretical and empirical relationships between power, crime and social change, and the impact of globalisation
  • Understand the relationship between theory, research design, and the selection of research methods and be able to identify and critically evaluate the epistemological positions upon which they are predicated.
  • how crime, deviance and victimisation are socially and legally constructed the different sources of information about crime and victimisation, both quantitative and qualitative, and how they are produced - including their location in particular legal, political, social and ideological frameworks - and how they can be interpreted
  • trends in crime, harm and victimisation
  • different forms of crime and their social organisation
  • different theoretical and empirical approaches to the study, analysis and explanation of crime, deviance, harm and victimisation
  • relationships of crime, deviance and offending, and victimisation to social divisions such as: age, gender, sexuality, social class, race, ethnicity and religious faith
  • the development, role, organisation and governance of efforts to reduce and prevent crime, deviance and harm, and to ensure personal and public safety and security in different locations; the role of the state and non-governmental agencies
  • the effectiveness of such measures, and human rights issues in relation to preventive and pre-emptive measures
  • the social and historical development of the main institutions involved in crime control in different locations
  • the philosophy and politics of criminalisation, victimisation, criminal justice and modes of punishment

Adnoddau

Goblygiadau o ran adnoddau ar gyfer myfyrwyr

N/A

Rhestrau Darllen Bangor (Talis)

http://readinglists.bangor.ac.uk/modules/sxy-1005.html

Rhestr ddarllen

Brookman, Fiona, Maguire, Mike, Pierpoint, Harriet, and Bennett, Trevor (eds., 2010). Handbook on Crime. Callumpton: Willan. Case, Steve, Johnson, Phil, Manlow, David, Smith, Roger, and Williams, Kate (2017). Criminology. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Finch, Emily, and Fafinski, Stefan (2012). Criminology Skills. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Hale, Chris, Hayward, Keith, Wahidin, Azrini, and Wincup, Emma (eds., 2013). Criminology. 3rd edition, Oxford: Oxford University Press. Hopkins Burke, Roger (2018). Criminological Theory, 5th edition. London: Routledge. Joyce, Peter, and Wain, Neil (2011). A Dictionary of Criminal Justice. London: Routledge. Liebling, Aliston, Maruna, Shadd, and McAra, Lesley (eds., 2017). The Oxford Handbook of Criminology. 6th edition. Oxford: Oxford University Press. McLaughlin, Eugene, and Muncie, John (eds., 2013). The SAGE Dictionary of Criminology. Los Angeles: Sage. Newburn, Tim (2009). Key Readings in Criminology. Cullompton: Willan. Newburn, Tim (2017). Criminology. 3rd edition. London: Routledge. Rafter, Nicole, Biber, Katherine, Brown, Michelle, Carrabine, Eamonn, Cavender, Gray, Machura, Stefan, and Schept, Judah (eds., 2018). Oxford Encyclopedia on Crime, Media, and Popular Culture. 3 volumes. New York: Oxford University Press. Entries also online in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Criminology, DOI: 10.1093/acrefore/9780190264079.013.198.

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